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Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. Default Demasoni Cichlid


    0 Not allowed!
    So yesterday i got a demasoni cichlid thats about 1.5 inches. he is in my 10 gallon now and i am going to grow him to a size where i can put him in the main display. he is on his own. there is a big dead coral in there to offer cover for him and to buffer the water. i took ceramics from my main tank and put a few in that filter so i'm not worried about ammonia or nitrite. he isn eating and isn't coming out either. he almost seems like he is shaking. his colour is pale and is just generally stressed. i put in a herbal fish de-stresser. any ideas what i could do to make him feel at home and what i should try to feed him.

  2. #2

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Excluding the shaking, the behavior that you've described seems to be expected. Mbuna's are social fish by their very nature. Small social fish are very secure in groups.

    Placing one into a (presumeably) solitary system may cause them to behave very timidly and unsecure, especially if the specimen is a small juvenile and after a single day of being placed in this new environment.

    The shaking that you indicated, however is of concern. How was this fish acclimated to the tank, and what are the tank's parameters.

    How large are fish in the tank that this demasoni will eventually be joining and what species are they?

    What type of food have you been offering?
    African cichlid and saltwater aquariums

    http://www.rowelab.com/AquaControlle...9&scope=last24

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Are you saying I should get another one? Hopefully he will be introduced to a 80 gal system with venestus, moori, yellow lab, blue peacock cichlids. The tank has got rocks as well as open space. I have a dead coral so that should buffer the water. I haven't done testing on ammonia etc but I put ceramics from my main displays filter so not worried about that. Temp is 77F. He won't come up to the surface so I can't feed him regular pellets. I have been offering dried seaweed and boiled cucumber soaked in garlic on those seaweed clip for grazer thingies

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by borat View Post
    Are you saying I should get another one?
    Unfortunately, pseudotropheus demasoni are highly conspecific-aggressive. They usually have low tolerance to their own kind when kept in small numbers. Properly stocked you'd want to keep a dozen of them as a minimum.

    They do quite well with other mbuna species though (the one's that do not resemble them, that is). If this demasoni were in a tank with other similarly sized mbuna's it would be more confident and interact with them (prompting it to display its best colors) and compete with them during feeding.

    Quote Originally Posted by borat View Post
    Hopefully he will be introduced to a 80 gal system with venestus, moori, yellow lab, blue peacock cichlids.
    You've got quite a mix of african cichlids there with different dietary requirements and different levels of aggression. A full grown venustus (they top out at 10" or maybe even an inch more) are predatory and is capable of eating a full grown female demasoni (which I've yet to see pass 3") if given the chance. Lots of rocks should help though (small mbuna's can venture into areas that large cichlid species can't.

    Is the moori that you have a cyrtocara moorii ('malawi blue dolphin', a type of lake malawi hap) or a tropheus moorii (a lake tanganyikan cichlid).

    Quote Originally Posted by borat View Post
    He won't come up to the surface so I can't feed him regular pellets. I have been offering dried seaweed and boiled cucumber soaked in garlic on those seaweed clip for grazer thingies
    I would either add crushed veggie flakes or pellets into the out flow of an HOB filter (if that is what you have) which will propel the food below the water surface (that's how I feed my mbuna fry).

    Since your first post has your demasoni changed it's behavior or has eaten anything?
    African cichlid and saltwater aquariums

    http://www.rowelab.com/AquaControlle...9&scope=last24

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    i have malawi blue dolphin. the venestus cichlid does harras the other fish but not to a extent that they get hurt, i think i will put one of my yellow lab cichlid fry(of which i have MANY) to help him settle in like you said might help him. i have a veggie clip so i just put the food on their and that helps. i have lots of rocks that the larger fish cant go into. the only fish that uses the rocks are the yellow labs of which i have olny 3 adults and many babies which i am in the process of selling. thanks for the advice. i will add the yellow lab fry and see how that goes

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    i want to get a maingano cichlid as well but they look very similar. do you think they would get along. i also dont see the venestus hunting the other fry simply because if theirs food being fed to them, why go through the effort of hunting a fish

  7. #7

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Maingano's and demasoni's are both blue/black striped fish, though the fact that the former is horizontally striped and the latter is vertically striped should be a enough of a difference for them not to mistake each other as the same species. With that said, mbuna aggression can extend across species lines (i.e., if aggression manifests between the demasoni and maingano it is not because the two are similar but rather aggression may arise to settle dominance and territorial pursuits).

    Venustus (and the other nimbochromis species) consume juvenile mbuna fry 'for a living' in lake malawi (more of an ambush predator than a 'hunter'); small edible sized mbuna tank mates may instinctively be considered food even to a well-fed nimbochromis.

    Due to the size that venustus get they're capable of eating mbuna's larger than fry-size (~1cm); for example a 10" well-fed venustus could snap up a 1.5"-2" juvie with little effort.
    African cichlid and saltwater aquariums

    http://www.rowelab.com/AquaControlle...9&scope=last24

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