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Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11

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    0 Not allowed!
    I would respectfully suggest there may be something else causing the red gills. If I could see the fish "live" it would be better. What is the respiration rate? And are any of them flashing on objects? Are they remaining near the surface (they are not in the photo)?

    Did you test the GH and pH of the tank, and compare that to the water the fish came in?

    You say that a 50g tank was set up with the "dirty" sponge filter and 10 neons. If this is correct, you should never have seen any ammonia or nitrite. The immense water volume plus the sponge filter would take care of 10 neons with no problem. If you tested for ammonia and nitrite it would I am certain have been zero. So, when did those other fish get added?

    Just a quick comment on that inaccurate and misleading video. There are no bacteria in the dirty water. Bacteria are very sticky, and they adhere and adhere very well to surfaces in what is termed a biofilm. It is impossible to shake them off a sponge by squeezing it in water. So forget that silly video or you will have dead fish.

    Byron.

  2. #12

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    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by xdeadromeox View Post
    So in your experience, are those gills really bad or it's just slightly reddish? I mean I'm just curious about the amount of damage I've done. I've just realized my Zebra's are having red gills as well, it's kinda visible.
    I've seen worse. I still think ammonia is the most likely but you'd see some gasping at the surface as well.


    I'm sorry overview shot is the picture of the whole aquarium?

    Aquarium:
    http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u...psc843c022.jpg
    Hmmm.. Lot of water with little cover, you might want to think about that. I bet at this time most of your fish hang out near the bottom? What's the plant in the back right? Fake?

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by fishmommie
    the fish should recover provided you complete the daily water changes.
    How long you do the water changes will be determined by the results of your ammonia tests.
    any time ammonia approaches .50ppm (same with NitrItes) you need to do a water change. Once ammonia and nitrates both reach 0 PRIOR to a water change, you have achieved a cycled tank. Then you need to keep nitrAtes below 20ppm
    GREAT! Now I know what numbers to hit and maintain.


    If I could see the fish "live" it would be better


    What is the respiration rate?
    I have no clue how to observe their resp rate.


    And are any of them flashing on objects?
    They're not flashing/rubbing themselves on anything.

    Are they remaining near the surface?
    None of them actually went up to the surface since I got them 3 days back.

    Did you test the GH and pH of the tank, and compare that to the water the fish came in?
    Not sure what GH is, I tried google and it came up with Growth Hormone, General Hospital and Guitar Hero. My PH tester has a max of 7.6pH and the reading was 7.6pH, so I'm guess the pH could be more than 7.6. I did compare with the water from the store was theirs was around 7.0/7.2 ish.

    The immense water volume plus the sponge filter would take care of 10 neons with no problem.
    EXACTLY what I had in mind before I did what I did.

    So, when did those other fish get added?
    Got my 10 neons 3 days back and all the rest was added yesterday.

    Welcome back talldutchie.
    I still think ammonia is the most likely but you'd see some gasping at the surface as well.
    I'm trying to observe them, though it had been only the 3rd day with my neons, the moment I saw red gills I came here and started making water changes straight away following your advise. Is it possible that the ammonia level went down, that's why they're not gasping air from the surface?

    Lot of water with little cover, you might want to think about that.
    You mean I should have more hiding places/decorations? Sure I would. It's my new tank and I'm a new aquarist, started less than a month ago with a betta and a 15 Gal tank. This is my 2nd tank and set up with the minimal expense.

    I bet at this time most of your fish hang out near the bottom?
    Yes, they actually do hang out at the bottom, what does it mean? I'm a little confused, Byron suspects the fish would be swimming at the surface, and you seem to be quite sure my fish are at the bottom, what does it indicate, ammonia poisoning? Disease?

    What's the plant in the back right?
    I dont know what it's called but it's not fake. There's only 1 shop in my city that sells them.

    Should I be using ammonia removers?

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Ammonia test result:

  5. #15

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    0 Not allowed!
    Hmm... the plot thickens...

    I see some fairly healthy fish, certainly not the typical ammonia struck bunch I'd expected to see. (that video is a great help). I don't know why there's some read gills but this bunch seems healthy enough.

    GH stands for general hardness. It's a scale in degrees where 1 degree is defined as 10 mg/L CaO. Most of your fish come from waters that have a low mineral content. Keeping these in high mineral content or hard water places a greater strain on the organism. The exact effects of that are debatable but for now I wouldn't worry too much about it.

    Issues I do see:
    The plant in the back right is not an aquatic species, it looks like a kind of Dracaena. It will cope with being submerged for some weeks but after that it will start to rot and die. All of these fish will prefer some more cover which is why they are staying low at the moment. Exactly what to provide depends a lot on your tastes. A simple way to handle this is to buy a nice piece of driftwood. Soak it for a few weeks (or go for fake wood) and then tie or glue some anubias and/or java fern to it.
    You can also get some real aquarium plants that root. Echinodorus or amazon sword comes in 2 dozen varieties and quite a few are big enoug for your tank. Plant in the gravel after you've pushed one or two of these in the gravel: http://www.seachem.com/Products/prod...urishTabs.html
    Any real plant will benefit from http://www.seachem.com/Products/prod.../Flourish.html and http://www.seachem.com/Products/prod...rishExcel.html (with the latter go for about 50-60% of recommended dosage)


    your stock list:
    Dwarf Crayfish x1
    Black Tetras x2
    Zebra Danios x3
    Thailand/Siamese Flying Fox 3
    Fire Red Shrimps x4
    Neon Tetras x10



    The crayfish seems an American species, I'm not too familiar with those. All I can say is that it will enjoy a flower pot or something to shelter under. It may well decide to eat your shrimp.

    You're very low on black tetras. It's a group species just like the neons.

    The danios tend to prefer somewhat cooler water than the rest of your fish and they also enjoy a group.

    The flying foxes will have very little to eat initially so make sure they get food. Piece of zuchinni for example or an algae wafer otherwise they will starve.

  6. #16

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    0 Not allowed!
    May I suggest that you don't use ammonia removers - from everything I've learned here, the way to remove ammonia is via water changes!
    46 gal fw tank with black skirt tetras, neon tetras, spotted corys, cherry barbs, otoclinus, snails & 4 amano shrimp - plastic & live plants
    5 gal QT
    Remember: Our job is to take care of the water our fish live in

  7. #17

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    0 Not allowed!
    Yes, the video was instructive. I would now be even more certain that ammonia (and nitrite) is not the issue as I suspected from your earlier information. The ammonia test bears this out.

    I too don't see anything in the videos that bothers me, as far as the earlier photos of red gills, and they don't seem red now. I do agree with talldutchie that you absolutely need more cover, in the tank and at the surface.

    The white substrate is not the best for fish, so anything to "darken" it will help. Lots of chunks of wood (the shrimp and fish will love these). Floating plants. These both will make a vast difference.

    Do you know what the substrate is? White can mean calcareous, which adds more mineral to the water, raising the GH (hardness) and pH. One way to test is via pH. Test the tank water for pH, and test the tap water for pH. Compare the results. When testing tap water, shake some water in a clean jar very vigorously for several minutes to out-gas the CO2, otherwise the reading may be inaccurate depending how much CO2 might be present in your tap water. Let us know the readings.

    Byron.

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Did you use any chemicals or soaps to clean the tank or items in it? Are you certain the anti-chlorine product you're using is dosed appropriately? Does your tapwater have chloramine in it? If so your product my not work as well.

  9. #19

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    If it was chloramine the shrimp would be dead. Same goes for a lot of cleaning products.

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