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Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 23 of 23
  1. #21

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    The linked article has some relevant suggestions, but bear in mind it is primarily saltwater.

    Algae is natural in any and all aquaria, and we should never be surprised to see it. It feeds on nutrients (organics) and certain types require light of greater intensity than others. It is only when we have plants that it can become a nuisance.

    Fishmommie, to your diatoms. Low light I would suggest is the cause here. LED lighting is generally weaker unless it is specifically intended for planted tanks. So this probably explains the diatoms in your 90g. There is low light, no live plants (if I read you correctly), so the "algae" that will naturally appear to consume the nutrients will be diatoms. If the light was brighter it would be one of the green or red types. If live plants were present, and they were species appropriate to the light intensity, they would out-compete algae for the nutrients.

    You mention light two years old; if this is fluorescent tube lighting, it is past its effectiveness. I have always replaced my T8 fluorescent tubes at around 12 months, but I did an experiment a couple years back to test the advice some give that T8 can go longer, up to 2 years. I found that the good tubes, in my case Life-Glo T8, seem to put out sufficient light intensity for up to 18 months, though I felt that plant response was less after 12 months. But after 18, I started to see algae really increase, which is a sure sign that the light is insufficient for the plants to photosynthesize. I replaced the tubes, and within a couple weeks end of algae. Nothing else was altered, fertilization remained as before throughout. The less expensive T8 tubes, like the GE, Phillips, Sylvania which I also use, should be replaced at 12 months, no longer. And with dual tubes, it is best to stagger them every six months so a new tube goes in every six months but each is kept for 12 months.

    Byron.
    Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
    Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Byron View Post
    The linked article has some relevant suggestions, but bear in mind it is primarily saltwater.

    Algae is natural in any and all aquaria, and we should never be surprised to see it. It feeds on nutrients (organics) and certain types require light of greater intensity than others. It is only when we have plants that it can become a nuisance.

    Fishmommie, to your diatoms. Low light I would suggest is the cause here. LED lighting is generally weaker unless it is specifically intended for planted tanks. So this probably explains the diatoms in your 90g. There is low light, no live plants (if I read you correctly), so the "algae" that will naturally appear to consume the nutrients will be diatoms. If the light was brighter it would be one of the green or red types. If live plants were present, and they were species appropriate to the light intensity, they would out-compete algae for the nutrients.
    Yes, you are correct. There are no live plants in the 90 gal SA cichlid tank. Would floating hornwort improve the situation? I have some coming. I'll also research what plants will not be eaten or uprooted by my Sev and EBJD

    You mention light two years old; if this is fluorescent tube lighting, it is past its effectiveness. I have always replaced my T8 fluorescent tubes at around 12 months, but I did an experiment a couple years back to test the advice some give that T8 can go longer, up to 2 years. I found that the good tubes, in my case Life-Glo T8, seem to put out sufficient light intensity for up to 18 months, though I felt that plant response was less after 12 months. But after 18, I started to see algae really increase, which is a sure sign that the light is insufficient for the plants to photosynthesize. I replaced the tubes, and within a couple weeks end of algae. Nothing else was altered, fertilization remained as before throughout. The less expensive T8 tubes, like the GE, Phillips, Sylvania which I also use, should be replaced at 12 months, no longer. And with dual tubes, it is best to stagger them every six months so a new tube goes in every six months but each is kept for 12 months.
    Byron.
    Yes, the bulb in the 5 gal is close to 2 years old. I've been having difficulty finding a bulb to replace it. I may just wait a bit more then upgrade to a 10 or 15 gal tank.
    Thanks to both you and Ladyhobbs for the suggestions.

    Thanks
    30 g FW planted:corys, ABNP, blue angel, harleys, zebra danios, pair kribs, & nerite snails
    15 g FW planted: crown tail betta, neons, snails
    90 g FW semi planted: EBJD, congos, apple snails
    90 Gal Journal: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ad.php?t=93939
    Fishless cycling: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ead.php?t=5640
    Cycling with fish: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ad.php?t=36492

  3. #23

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    QUOTE]Yes, you are correct. There are no live plants in the 90 gal SA cichlid tank. Would floating hornwort improve the situation? I have some coming. I'll also research what plants will not be eaten or uprooted by my Sev and EBJD[/QUOTE]

    This is a situation where I always suggest more of a biotope aquascape, and it is very easy. Substrate of fine gravel or sand, lots of branches and/or chunks of wood, no substrate plants. A good layer of floating plants. The light, whatever it is, will be sufficient for the floating plants, and they being fast growing are heavy feeders so organics/nutrients will be mainly utilized. Algae will still appear, obviously, but it should be less and controllable.

    Now, you could modify this a bit, by including some low-light tough plants, such as Java Fern or Anubias, fastened to some of the wood. Adds a bit of green, and not so likely to be molested. I don't think anything eats Java Fern (which would be my preference, it is pretty tough), and being attached to wood it would survive being moved about if that should occur. Java Moss could also be used on some of the wood.

    I'm attaching a few photos to illustrate what I'm thinking of, generally. Some may not have floating plants, but they are easily added. These are all for South American fish.

    Byron.

    Attachment 30547Attachment 30548Attachment 30549[
    Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
    Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

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