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Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. Default Need advice if my hospital/cycling plan makes sense


    0 Not allowed!
    Hi, I'm definitely new to the whole fish thing and made a lot of beginner mistakes. Long story short, I knew it was overdue to move my 1 year old Common Goldfish out of its 5 gallon tank into a real tank. So I bought a 55 gallon, transferred in a lot of the rock, the bio sponge, and one of the fake plants. I figured that the tank wasn't technically cycled (I did know a little about keeping fish), but goldfish are hardy and it had a good start to the bacteria from all the transfers.

    I got 2 Moore Goldfish (about 3" each so that my Common wouldn't try to eat them). I followed the store's instructions and of course one had ich and infected the whole tank because (now I know) their instructions/advice were rubbish on just about every level I can think of; including the fact that they should not have even sold me the fish until a month after I bought the tank. The one with ich died, they replaced it, all 3 got ich. I realized this must have all been preventable and was my fault for not doing research. Then, I spent hours and hours reading this site. Here where I'm at and I would appreciate any tweaks to my plan...

    Hospital Tank- I only have the 5 gallon and all 3 fish are in there, but it's obviously temporary. All rocks/ornaments are removed and only the old sponge is in there for bacterial needs. There isn't enough space in the tank for the good bacteria to meet the needs of all three goldfish, but the sponge is well established.

    Here's how I'm dealing with the small sized temp tank (because I'm out of pet money with the new 55 gallon and all the meds):
    In the morning, first I feed them, then I vacuum out any remaining food and what looks like a ridiculous amount of parasite eggs that have fallen to the floor (much better today, by the way). I do a 50% partial water change and replace it with dechlorinated water that has the proper dose of maricide for the day and a capful of active bacteria to help with the ammonia. At night, I test for ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate in case I need to do a second water change, but I haven't needed to. The PH is around 7.6 and is staying constant. Then I feed them and vacuum out the junk completely and top off the tank. I pretty much have to put more food in than necessary because they are really sluggish from the ich and meds and don't find the food unless it falls in their face. Only afterwards do they start swimming around looking for more.

    They're on day 3 of the maricide treatment today. I realize that 50% pwc means a lot of medicine is lost, but they are dosed pretty heavy for 24 hrs and half of it remains in the water on the off day after the water change, so it should be fine; especially considering the meds break down rapidly anyway. I'll go to day 5 like instructions say to and then switch over to copper sulfate the next day because I need to treat the water at that point and not the fish and because it's supposed to be less harmful/stressful to the fish. They already have a pretty good slime coat from the added chitosan in the maricide, so that alone will help prevent a secondary infection. Good news is that they are all eating, don't have any white things anymore, are moving around a bit, and their fins are finally most-of-the-way unclamped.

    I plan on leaving them in the hospital tank for the next month because I want to ensure that the main tank's parasites have 100% died before I reintroduce them.

    Main Tank- Removed the activated carbon forever and replaced it with bio-sponge. Did a +90% water change with a very aggressive gravel filtering. Added copper sulfate (I plan on maintaining the recommended maintenance dosage for at least the next two months). Then I added bacteria starter for whatever that is worth, a pinch of finely dusted food, and 55 drops of industrial grade non-surfactant ammonia (purchased at a hardware store), which brought the level up to about 3-4 ppm. When 24 hours causes a drop to zero, I'll start testing for nitrites as well. When it drops to zero too, I'll test for nitrates after a 50% pwc change and from then on do a 20% pwc whenever the levels approach 30 ppm. I'll start testing for PH a in a couple of weeks, but my tap water is around 7.6, which is fine for goldfish. I'll stop the ammonia treatment for 24 hours prior to re-admitting the fish at the end of the month.

    Yes? No? Thank you for reading all of this. I know it's a lot. But, this site taught me a lot and I'm trying to figure out if I understood everything correctly.

  2. #2

    Default


    2 Not allowed!
    If I read everything correctly, you are doing an awesome job with your ich problem.

    What I would recommend for the future is to save up $ after you're done treating the ich and get a larger tank for quarantine purposes and run a filter appropriate for its size in your main tank so you always have a cycled filter if you need it.

    You appear to have a real handle on how to deal with a tank before it's properly cycled. Sounds like your fish are dealing with things well - your QT is bare bottomed?
    46 gal fw tank with black skirt tetras, neon tetras, spotted corys, cherry barbs, otoclinus, snails & 4 amano shrimp - plastic & live plants
    5 gal QT
    Remember: Our job is to take care of the water our fish live in

  3. Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Good job handling the ich

    As for fishless cycling your main tank, you said

    "Main Tank- Removed the activated carbon forever and replaced it with bio-sponge. Did a +90% water change with a very aggressive gravel filtering. Added copper sulfate (I plan on maintaining the recommended maintenance dosage for at least the next two months). Then I added bacteria starter for whatever that is worth, a pinch of finely dusted food, and 55 drops of industrial grade non-surfactant ammonia (purchased at a hardware store), which brought the level up to about 3-4 ppm.
    Okay so far.
    "When 24 hours causes a drop to zero, I'll start testing for nitrites as well.When ammonia drops to 0 AND you have a nitrite reading, then you need to dose ammonia again to 1/2 of your starting dose. In your case around 2ppm.
    Test once every 24 hours and only dose ammonia again IF it drops to 0 and you're still showing nitrites.


    "When it drops to zero too, I'll test for nitrates after a 50% pwc change and from then on do a 20% pwc whenever the levels approach 30 ppm. When both nitrites and ammonia are 0 you should have nitrAtes and at that point your tank is cycled. Do a 90% water change to get the nitrates down below 20ppm then stock your fish. You're done.

    "I'll start testing for PH a in a couple of weeks, but my tap water is around 7.6, which is fine for goldfish. Good call. PH is always unstable during a fishless cycle. It should settle in once the cycle is complete. Unless it's terribly hi or terribly lo, I'd leave it alone. Stable PH is much more important than perfect PH.
    I'll stop the ammonia treatment for 24 hours prior to re-admitting the fish at the end of the month. See above. But there is no need to continue treating with ammonia once both ammonia and nitrites hit 0 (because your tank is then cycled) unless you don't plan on adding your fish right away. If you plan to wait, then yes, dose to around 2ppm every 24 hours for each day you delay adding your fish.

    Hope that helped and good for you for doing all this research. Hope the dreaded ich is gone once and for all soon. Remember that even after all the white spots are gone from the fish, the ich protozoan can live for up to 10 days so continue treatment until then.

    '
    Yes? No?"
    30 g FW planted:corys, ABNP, blue angel, harleys, zebra danios, pair kribs, & nerite snails
    15 g FW planted: crown tail betta, neons, snails
    90 g FW semi planted: EBJD, congos, apple snails
    90 Gal Journal: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ad.php?t=93939
    Fishless cycling: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ead.php?t=5640
    Cycling with fish: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ad.php?t=36492

  4. Default


    2 Not allowed!
    Thank you.

    I will definitely get a larger QT tank soon and a second filter along with it. I read to keep the QT bare because it's easier to diagnose how everything is doing. You can actually see all the eggs as they drop to the bottom. My 3 fish dropped hundreds of them. They're easy to vacuum up before they burst open because they just slide around on the glass instead of getting caught up in the gravel.

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Thank you, fishmommie.

    "When ammonia drops to 0 AND you have a nitrite reading, then you need to dose ammonia again to 1/2 of your starting dose. In your case around 2ppm. Test once every 24 hours and only dose ammonia again IF it drops to 0 and you're still showing nitrites."
    That makes a lot of sense. I could see how there could be too much ammonia if I just keep adding it before it gets processed. Same goes for the nitrites.
    Also, I will do the initial 90% water change after the full cycle and keep nitrates below 20 ppm from then on.



    "...unless you don't plan on adding your fish right away. If you plan to wait, then yes, dose to around 2ppm every 24 hours for each day you delay adding your fish.

    ...Remember that even after all the white spots are gone from the fish, the ich protozoan can live for up to 10 days so continue treatment until then."

    I was going to wait until both the QT and the main tank couldn't possibly have live protozoan in it before adding the fish back in. I'll keep the 2ppm going until then.

    Again, thank you very much. I will not let these fish die.

  6. #6

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    I've got to say - that is very cool, being able to see all the eggs so you can just vacuum them up before they hatch & latch onto a fish - most people don't have the advantage of moving fish to a QT because usually there are too many fish in their tank & the whole tank needs to be treated.

    Most people keep a bare bottom QT - it encourages more frequent water changes because you can see how much poop is being produced but in the case of ich it's even more helpful : )
    46 gal fw tank with black skirt tetras, neon tetras, spotted corys, cherry barbs, otoclinus, snails & 4 amano shrimp - plastic & live plants
    5 gal QT
    Remember: Our job is to take care of the water our fish live in

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