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Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. Unhappy Is my tank cursed?


    0 Not allowed!
    Hello, I'm new to fishkeeping and my fish keep dieing. I can't figure out if I'm doing something wrong or if my tank is just cursed. I hope someone can help me here. My tank is 2.5 gallons i think. I used to keep a betta but I found it boring so I decided I wanted to get some different fish. I originally wanted a few goldfish but the guy at the pet store said that they would grow too big for my tank, and that I should get a heater so that I could get tropical fish instead. So I cycled my tank by letting it run for a week and then I bought a molly and 2 neon tetras. The next morning both the tetras were dead. So I went back to the pet store and exchanged them for 2 more. The next day they were dead again. I thought maybe that pet store was selling bad fish so I went to a different one and asked what I should do. The guy said that my molly was probably killing them in the night since they get aggressive during breeding season. He said I should get semi aggressive fish instead. So I got 2 tiger barbs. The next morning one of the barbs and the molly were both dead, and the other barb was hiding and looked sick. I'm worried its gonna die so someone help! I have a filter and I added 2 conditioners to my water, 1 that gets rid of chlorine and 1 that breaks down waste. The tank is heated and has 1 plant in it.

  2. #2

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    No fish will be ok in that tank. Its just to small. Most pet store employees will tell you anything to get you to buy from them. If you want fish get a 10 gallon tank and read about fishless cycle before you add the fish. I would return the fish and if you truly care about keeping fish do some research first.
    Roll the Dice!

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    While some folks do keep fish in a 2.5 gallon tank, they are very sensitive due to the low water volume. Doing so requires expertise in stocking and monitoring for and addressing problems quickly. I agree with Gogi, that a beginner should start with an aquarium no smaller than 10 gallons.

    However, not all hope is lost. First try to find a suitable home for the barb. Putting more aggressive fish in simply turned the tides, but keeping a lone barb is not a good idea, and both molly and barb are too large for a 2.5 gallon tank. Second, you'll want to learn about the cycling process. Third, you can get some freshwater shrimp (a lot of places sell ghost or glass shrimp cheep, though Red Cherry Shimp are also hearty and more interesting to watch unless you like to play "where's waldo" a whole lot) for your 2.5 gallon aquarium. You could start with up to a dozen, if they breed, you'll need to keep the population under about two dozen.

    You'll want to do some research online about anything you want to put into your aquarium BEFORE you buy. This will keep you from wasting your time and money, plus you can know that you're providing a healthy and appropriate habitat for your aquarium's inhabitants.

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Agree with all of the above.

    Pet stores WILL sell you anything - that's their job - it's YOUR job to research fish you are interested in and find out what their living requirements are BEFORE purchase - go into a store without your wallet LOL

    Some fish require a minimum tank size - you will never find a fish recommended for a 2.5 gal tank - that's super small and as stated above, good for tiny shrimp or snails.

    The best bet is to get the largest tank you can afford & have room for - easier to maintain good water quality that way - and then find out what you can put into it (fully grown too) - OR, find a fish you like, see if it needs a "school" or not, see how potentially big it can grow and then buy a suitable tank to house it.

    Read about cycling & see whether the fish you want is cold water or tropical.
    46 gal fw tank with black skirt tetras, neon tetras, spotted corys, cherry barbs, otoclinus, snails & 4 amano shrimp - plastic & live plants
    5 gal QT
    Remember: Our job is to take care of the water our fish live in

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    The barb just died :( So they are dieing becuase the tank is too small? I thought the tank looked plenty big, but I guess I was wrong. I cant get a big tank becuase the shelf i have is only 12 inches wide. But i like the idea of getting shrimp. The pet store I went to sells cherry shrimp, so I will buy some next time I go there. They are very pretty.

    I looked up "cycling" on google but I don't get it. Do you just let your filter run for a month or do you do something else? Can someone explain it to me?

  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Your fish are dying because they are in a tiny, uncycled tank. The way to cycle a tank is to add pure ammonia to the water with the filter running - you can't just let it sit.

    Cycling is the nitrogen cycle - you need a source of ammonia to grow bacteria in your filter - this bacteria will "eat" ammonia and eventually process the ammonia down to nitrates which a cycled tank will generally have a low reading for (less than 20ppm). A completely cycled tank will also have readings for ammonia & nitrites (both will be 0 in the end).

    To cycle, I would recommend getting janitorial strength ammonia (shake the bottle - if it foams it's not good), a dropper and a liquid test kit to monitor your "parameters" (ammonia, nitrites & nitrates) - NOT test strips which are not reliable.

    Add enough ammonia to get reading of 2ppm (adding little by little)and then let it drop to 0, monitoring with your test kit - there is a "sticky" on this subject in the beginners section to tell you what to do after adding ammonia for the 1st time.

    Edit: here is the link: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ead.php?t=5640

    Getting shrimp is a good idea.
    46 gal fw tank with black skirt tetras, neon tetras, spotted corys, cherry barbs, otoclinus, snails & 4 amano shrimp - plastic & live plants
    5 gal QT
    Remember: Our job is to take care of the water our fish live in

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    But first please cycle your tank or you will continue to lose whatever you put in there!

    You will also want to change 0.5 to 1 gal of water each week, using a dechlorinator that is appropriate for your tap water (if you have chloramines you need to make sure the dechlorniator can handle those). You also must use this when you cycle the tank, because the chlorine in tapwater will kill the bacteria that are necessary to detoxify these wastes.

    Here are a couple guides to red cherry shrimp care: http://www.planetinverts.com/Red%20Cherry%20Shrimp.html, http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/inv/redcherry.php.

    Feeding will be based on the amount of algae. If you have a lot of algae (and you've identified it as something they can eat) then they can subsist on that quite some time. If you have NO algae (unlikely) you'll need to feed them entirely. I feed mine once a week or so to supplement their diet, fresh / blanched veggies or a piece of an algae wafer work well. Usually this is placed on a dish or saucer and removed after a couple of hours to avoid over feeding.

  8. #8

    Default


    3 Not allowed!
    Not sure whether it has been done but something that tends to be neglected is explaining why cycling needs to be done and not just how.
    Well, fish produce waste which degrades into ammonia. In an uncycled tank this would build up to lethal levels quickly. Cycling is the process of accumulating beneficial bacteria that feed on and convert ammonia into less harmful substances that can be removed with every water change. Most people starting out have never heard of this for some reason, and thus their first fish die.

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