Aquarium Forum
 


Menu
  · Tropical Fish Home
· Fish News
· Aquarium Forum
· Buy & Sell
· Calculators
· Equipment reviews
· Free Aquarium Ebook
· Feedback
· Link to us
· Photo gallery
· Plant species
· Tropica Plant DB
Tropical fish species
· By Common name
· By Scientific name
Tropical Marine fish
· By Common name
· By Scientific name

_________________
 
      
        Via paypal

  AC news is a part of
      Nature Blog Network

      Reef Aquarium Blog

Privacy & Ad Policy

Articles
  · African Cichlids
· Algae Control
· Aquarium Decoration
· Aquarium Resources
· Aquatic Plants
· Barb Fish
· Betta Fish
· Breeding Fish
· Catfish
· Central American Cichlids
· Cichlids
· Clownfish
· Corals
· Corydoras Catfish
· Discus Fish
· Dwarf Cichlids
· Fish Diseases
· Frogs and Turtles
· Goby Fish
· Goldfish
· Gourami
· Invertebrates
· Jellyfish
· Killiefish
· Lake Victoria Cichlids
· Livebearers
· Malawi Cichlids
· Marine Aquariums
· Marine Aquarium Fish
· Other Fish
· Pleco
· Predatory Fish
· Photography
· Pond Fish
· Responsible Fish Keeping
· Rainbow Fish
· Shark Fish
· South American Cichlids
· Tanganyika Cichlids
· Tetra Fish
· Tropical Fish Food
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. Default Stress Zyme Problems


    0 Not allowed!
    So I have a black moor goldfish and a shubunkin goldfish in a 37 gallon tank. We got them at petsmart and we had an alarmist associate (If you don't ______, your fish will die!) who told us to get live bacteria to put in the tank. She recommended Stress Zyme. We bought a bottle, and put two cap's worth into the tank like she said, and now the tank and the water are getting much dirtier, much more quickly than it normally would. I'm even noticing a bit of a smell coming from the tank. Is Stress Zyme really necessary, and how often should I clean the tank if I keep using it?

  2. #2

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    What exactly do you mean by the water getting much dirtier? Do you mean cloudy? Or detritus on the substrate? How long has this tank been running, with the fish?

    While waiting for those answers, some background. Are you knowledgeable on the nitrification cycle? Briefly, fish release ammonia through their continual respiration, and ammonia is highly toxic. Bacteria establish in the aquarium that take up ammonia. These bacteria produce nitrite, another form of nitrogen which is also highly toxic, and different bacteria take up nitrite and produce nitrate. Nitrate is also toxic, but less so, and it can be controlled by weekly partial water changes, live plants, and not overstocking or overfeeding. This is the nitrification cycle, and it can take from 2 to 8 weeks for this to establish; various factors affect it.

    The clerk was basically correct in saying that you needed to add bacteria, what we term seeding the tank, which will get the cycle going faster. Bacterial supplements can help with this. Here we come to the StressZyme. I have not myself used this product, but I have used other bacterial supplements. I cannot say if StressZyme is comparable, but it can't do any harm at this stage.

    Do you have a test kit for ammonia, nitrite and nitrate? The API liquid tests are reliable, and you can get these three plus pH in the Master Combo kit.

    Byron.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    The water has been getting cloudy, and the tank has been running for about 2 1/2 weeks. One thing I don't understand is why this is so necessary with goldfish. I always thought cycling was something people do for tropical fish.

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    And as a result of that last sentence of what I just posted, I don't know a lot about cycling because I never felt it was necessary for goldfish.

  5. Default


    2 Not allowed!
    Goldfish are among the largest waste producers of any fish. And all tanks need to be cycled. If you haven't made a water change yet, I suggest you do so asap - a large one - around 75%. If you do not have an API liquid master water test kit, you should also get one asap so you can monitor the Ammonia, Nitrites and Nitrates in the tank. Ammonia and or Nitrites that approach .50ppm are toxic to your fish and WILL cause illness and or death. Nitrates that exceed 20ppm can also cause issues. The only thing to do to get rid of those toxins is water changes. Perhaps daily while the tank is cycling.
    Please read the stickie on cycling with fish in my signature line.

    You should also google both of your species of fish for their profiles and read all you can about them so you can care for them correctly.

    And I HOPE the fish store sold you water conditioner to remove the chlorine from your tap water.
    Last edited by fishmommie; 09-30-2013 at 04:35 PM.
    30 g FW planted:corys, ABNP, blue angel, harleys, zebra danios, nerites & mystery snails
    15 g FW planted: crown tail betta, neons, snails
    90 g FW semi planted: Blood Parrots, severum, Jurupari, EBJD, congos, kribs, clown pleco, snails
    90 Gal Journal: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ad.php?t=93939
    Fishless cycling: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ead.php?t=5640
    Cycling with fish: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ad.php?t=36492

  6. Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Cycling is definitely necessary for goldfish.

    Does the smell seem to burn your nostrils a little? It could be ammonia. Cloudy water is often associated with bacterial blooms in response to elevated levels of nitrogenous wastes.

    Please review Cycling with fish

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •