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  1. Default Dario dario with honey gourami in a small tank?


    0 Not allowed!
    So I have been fantasizing about setting up a small tank for a couple of species that I have become interested in. About the largest I would be comfortable with is 20g (probably long rather than tall), though I would also like to consider a 12g such as the long or rectangle by mraqua (there is also a 17g rectangle that could work).

    I know both of these folks can be both timid and territorial, so I am curious as to whether they could thrive together. At a minimum I'd like to keep one male of each, and possibly a couple/few females if I can find them. More males (esp. of the d. dario) would be great, but I'd rather have a single healthy one than a second bullied one). I think the "long" designs appeal to me because they provide a lot territory for gallon. Of course this would be a heavily planted tank, ideally with one or two other species tbd. Does the concept of dither fish apply here at all?

  2. #2

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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Why not jusy make it a dario tank only
    KING OF THE GOLD BARBS RAWR!!!!
    I wonder if i plant one of my tiger barbs would the demon seed grow to a full tree?
    gotta love them bunnies!
    I.R.S.: We've got what it takes to take what you've got!

  3. #3

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    I concur. I would not combine these two species. If the 20g is selected, and I agree the long is usually better, a group of Honey Gourami would be fine. One male to three or four females. For tankmates, some quiet fish like one of the Trigonostigma species of rasbora would work well.

    Dario dario are best on their own, and in smallish tanks or tehy tend to get "lost." I don't mean the fish itself gets lost, but in larger tanks such small fish either look "out of place" or sort of "disappear." A 10g or 12g or similar works well with a group of this species. Feeding can be tricky though; many will only take live food, or at best frozen bloodworms and perhaps daphnia. Some aquarists manage to wean them onto prepared foods but this is not always successful; mine wouldn't, and slowly just wasted away.

    Byron.

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Ah bummer. I was hoping to be in luck with the two, but the more research I did the less sure I was. I would probably have to go with the honeys as they seem to be more hearty. Maybe a trio in 12g or I could just plunge for the 20.I've promised myself that I will wait until the 5g matures before I get another tank anyhow.

    Another thought though, would 5g be inadequate for a pair or trio of dario dario? I've also been tempted to try a 3g tank, possibly for a betta or maybe just shrimp. Oh all the possibilities, and dangers, of MTS.

  5. #5

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    I have dario dario, best kept in species only tank or with fish of a similar size. They do seem a bit sensitive too so make sure you keep water quality just right for them. I've lost maybe a third of all the dario dario I have bought.

  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Korith is right. And to your question, yes, a 5g would be suitable for a small group. Well planted; photo is my 10g for this fish , you can see one of them to left of centre.

    10g June 27-11 (1).jpg

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Well, they sure are enchanting, but I may not be prepared to care for them in the near future. I'll sure keep them in mind if I ever decide to relocate the RCS.

    Great looking tank byron! I can see what you mean about them getting "lost" in larger setups.

    I'm still pondering a triad of honeys in a 12g long (35.4 x 8.3 x 9.4 inches), with some small fish like rasboras and cories. AquaAdvisor seems to think that 3 honeys, 7 rasbora het and 7 pygmy cories would work in this tank with an eheim 2211, but it seems like it might be pushing it a little. The odd dimensions might be throwing off the calculations. Also with the very long design, I'm concerned that the 2211 might create too much of a current from one end of the tank to the other for the gourami.

  8. #8

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Zerileous View Post
    I'm still pondering a triad of honeys in a 12g long (35.4 x 8.3 x 9.4 inches), with some small fish like rasboras and cories. AquaAdvisor seems to think that 3 honeys, 7 rasbora het and 7 pygmy cories would work in this tank with an eheim 2211, but it seems like it might be pushing it a little. The odd dimensions might be throwing off the calculations. Also with the very long design, I'm concerned that the 2211 might create too much of a current from one end of the tank to the other for the gourami.
    The Eheim 2211 is way too much for a 12g. These fish do not appreciate being buffeted around, and they all occur in very quiet shallow ponds and small streams or flooded forest.

    I see no problems with the stocking. Longer and/or wider tanks are better than higher tanks always, in respect of fish load, because of the greater surface area both for the surface exchange of gasses but also for the substrate/space area that is better for most fish. With fish like those mentioned, and plants, minimal filtration will suffice. I would only use a dual sponge filter.

    In my 33g which is 36 inches in length, I have an old Eheim internal sponge filter that is nothing but a single sponge with a small motor. Unfortunately they don't make these any longer, and it is a nice little filter for smaller tanks at 3 feet length. But an Elite dual sponge would work, or perhaps something like the Fluval internal U1. Aqueon makes a similar internal filter.

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Interesting, how would I ensure that adequate circulation was achieved in the tank? I like the idea of having a canister or some source of bio media. In the past I have used Hagen AquaClear HOBs with success, though I was hoping to avoid a HOB design seeing as this is a rimless aquarium and I would be spending substantially more money on aesthetic in the first place. The ZooMed 501 canister (roughly 80 gph) may be more appropriate. I've also known people to simply use the ball valve on the eheim to decrease the flow. I find the volume of media appealing, and the concept of something capable of circulating water across the entire 36 inches.

    Thanks for all of your advice Byron, Korith and Genocidex! You all are great

  10. #10

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Zerileous View Post
    Interesting, how would I ensure that adequate circulation was achieved in the tank? I like the idea of having a canister or some source of bio media. In the past I have used Hagen AquaClear HOBs with success, though I was hoping to avoid a HOB design seeing as this is a rimless aquarium and I would be spending substantially more money on aesthetic in the first place. The ZooMed 501 canister (roughly 80 gph) may be more appropriate. I've also known people to simply use the ball valve on the eheim to decrease the flow. I find the volume of media appealing, and the concept of something capable of circulating water across the entire 36 inches.

    Thanks for all of your advice Byron, Korith and Genocidex! You all are great
    Filtration in a planted tank should be less than what one would want in the same-sized tank with no plants. There are two reasons. First is filtration itself; plants do this job better, so by lessening the biological filtration of filters we allow the plants to do their job better, without competition. Second is water flow; too much is not only bad for some fish, it is bad for plants. A gentle circulation of the tank water is sufficient as it removes suspended particulate matter from the water (looks clearer, but also avoids this settling on plant leaves which can suffocate them) and provides heat distribution.

    Media can be even more detrimental, depending what it is. Any chemical filtration like carbon should definitely be avoided. On my large tanks (70g, 90g and 115g) which have canisters, I only have half the so-called biological media suggested.

    There are actually more nitrifying bacteria living on surfaces throughout the tank than in the average filter anyway. Some advocate no filter at all in planted tanks; I have experimented with this on my 10g and it worked well for months. There is a lot of misunderstanding among aquarists when it comes to adequate filtration. More is certainly not better, all else being balanced.

    Byron.

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