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Results 11 to 15 of 15
  1. #11

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    0 Not allowed!
    LOL..ok, I stand very corrected. Which is actually what I love about this forum...with so many knowledgeable people, it's hard to get bad advice even when bad advice is given!

    Nickelodeon, you are much better off listening to any of the three people that responded after me instead of listening to me. I know I would! :-)

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Thanks for the suggestions. :)

    As starter, danios are active swimmers and I personally won't put them in anything smaller than a 3 foot tank.

    I'm also against cories in gravel... Any other recommendations?
    "The Dumpster Tank" 26g flat back hex - Betta albimarginata, corydoras, checker barbs, pork chop rasbora

    "Nano Fish Tank" 20g long - Celestial Pearl Danios, microrasboras, Corydoras habrosus

    "Mbuna Tank" 75g - Ps. saulosi, I. sprengerae, M. pulpican, M. joanjohnsonae

    "Time Out Tank" 29g - dominant male Cynotilapia sp. "hara"

  3. #13

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    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by nikelodeon79 View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions. :)

    As starter, danios are active swimmers and I personally won't put them in anything smaller than a 3 foot tank.

    I'm also against cories in gravel... Any other recommendations?
    To recap, the upper fish will be the minnows, correct? So you are now considering possible substrate fish as tankmates?

    I agree that with gravel, corys would be less suitable. Many similar substrate fish have the same problem, either the need for sand or they get too large as they need a group (thinking loaches). One possible is a whiptail catfish, in the Rineloricaria genus. These are small (avoid the larger "Royal" types), interesting, though not active. They need chunks of wood to graze.

    Byron.

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Byron View Post
    To recap, the upper fish will be the minnows, correct? So you are now considering possible substrate fish as tankmates?

    I agree that with gravel, corys would be less suitable. Many similar substrate fish have the same problem, either the need for sand or they get too large as they need a group (thinking loaches). One possible is a whiptail catfish, in the Rineloricaria genus. These are small (avoid the larger "Royal" types), interesting, though not active. They need chunks of wood to graze.

    Byron.
    Yes, the upper fish will be the minnows.

    Do the whiptails require groups?
    "The Dumpster Tank" 26g flat back hex - Betta albimarginata, corydoras, checker barbs, pork chop rasbora

    "Nano Fish Tank" 20g long - Celestial Pearl Danios, microrasboras, Corydoras habrosus

    "Mbuna Tank" 75g - Ps. saulosi, I. sprengerae, M. pulpican, M. joanjohnsonae

    "Time Out Tank" 29g - dominant male Cynotilapia sp. "hara"

  5. #15

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by nikelodeon79 View Post
    Yes, the upper fish will be the minnows.

    Do the whiptails require groups?
    No. I have pretty much had this fish in my largest tank since I've been in the hobby. They bring quite a different perspective, being somewhat "primitive" in appearance, but they are extremely peaceful and the Rineloricaria species do not get large. At 5 inches that may seem large, but they are so thin that you don't see a "large" fish. Any tank 20 gallons and up is suitable for one.

    The common name refers to the very extended upper filament on the caudal fin, a trait shared by all species in the genus. There are three different species regularly offered as "Whiptail" Catfish--Rineloricaria fallax, R. lanceolata and R. parva--that have slight variations in pattern and the placement of the ventral scutes. It is also possible that some available fish may be hybrids between these three and other species. All have identical requirements in the aquarium. The average lifespan is 5-8 years.

    Another neat fish in this same genus is commonly called the Red Lizard Whiptail. The precise origin of this fish is a mystery. It may possibly be a natural species, but most sources believe it is a man-made hybrid from one or more other Rineloricaria species, but which exactly is also unknown. The German aquarium resource publisher Aqualog introduced this species with the number L010a, but it bears no resemblance to L010. The "L" system was initiated by the German aquarium magazine DATZ [Die Aquarien und Terrarienzeitschrift] to identify the newly-discovered loricarid species prior to the scientific description and naming; these numbers are applied to all known species including those already or once named, so they are unique to each species.

    I acquired a trio of the "red" whiptails a couple years back, and will attach a photo of two of them shortly after I introduced them to my 115g tank; they are beside the older Rineloricaria parva which I've had for just over five years now. I have never seen any of these interact with even the slightest aggression, even when feeding side by side from sinking tablets and pellets. The red fellows are larger now, but still smaller than the R. parva; they spend their day slowly grazing surfaces. The red trio do seem to like resting up on the stems of sword plants quite a bit, whereas my common whiptail spends most of its time on the substrate sand or wood. The red has darkened considerably into more brown than red, although one of the three is still reddish in appearance. Still, a neat little fish.

    Byron.

    Whiptails (5).JPG
    Last edited by Byron; 10-20-2013 at 05:23 PM.

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