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Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11

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    0 Not allowed!
    I feel strongly on the use of salt, as others here will know from past threads. I did considerable research for an article a couple years back, and will link it below. I think it is good for all of us to understand the ramifications of some of the "fixes" we may have suggested to us by others who are, frankly, less well informed. We must never forget that every substance we add to the water is going to impact the fish, due to the extremely close physiological connection fish have to their aquatic environment. This is why they are so very much more sensitive to their environment than any land animal, as the article explains. As it mentions therein, one teaspoon of salt in 16 gallons of water causes stress to soft water fish, and some will slowly die from this little. The bracketed numbers refer to the references cited at the end of the article.

    http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...uarium-188649/
    Last edited by Byron; 09-17-2013 at 11:18 PM.
    Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
    Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

  2. #12

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    I agree that salt may play a part here. It does build up over time, and is not generally required.

    That said, another issue could be with your tap water itself. You can contact your local water department for a report on water quality, and one thing you will want to check is content of copper. Generally, the amount of copper in drinking water is safe for humans, but if you went from an area that has none, to one that has even trace, this can be a cause for ill health in your fish.

    I would also get a copper test kit, as copper may leech out from pipes in a new dwelling and not show up on a water report.
    2 10 gallon tanks, 1 20 gallon tank, 1 Fluval Edge, 1 29 gallon tank, and one backyard pond.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I went from a sm town to a big city. Im sure the metal amnt are very different. Asuming it is copper. Can I add an extra dose of water conditioner on top of the suggested amnt?

    I did another sm water change today to delute the salts further. Also cause I have not seen any improvement. And another fish has angry looking gills.

  4. #14

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cailany View Post
    I went from a sm town to a big city. Im sure the metal amnt are very different. Asuming it is copper. Can I add an extra dose of water conditioner on top of the suggested amnt?

    I did another sm water change today to delute the salts further. Also cause I have not seen any improvement. And another fish has angry looking gills.
    While it is possible, I would not consider copper the culprit. But any water conditioner that detoxifies heavy metals will take care of copper in the municipal water because it will be in trace amounts (by law, safe for humans though not on its own safe for fish). Only if you have new copper pipes might there be more copper than what the conditioners can handle.

    I would do major water changes. We all agree there is or was something toxic in the water. The amount of salt previously being added was considerable and it may have burnt the gills of the fish. This will not "go away" quickly, and I can't say if it will completely heal or not.

    Byron.
    Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
    Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

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