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Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. Question Are these good Beginner plants?


    0 Not allowed!
    I just started with live plants in my 50 gallon. I have 1 amazon sword plant.

    I would like to know if these plants can (1) live in low light,(2) do they float/bury under substrate/stick on hard surface.(3) Do not need c02 injection.

    I have done some research on them but I would like to be sure before I spend the money.

    Plants~
    Water lettuce
    Java Fern
    Anubias Barteri
    Crypt wendtil

    Also a low lightplant that is rooted under substrate ,that is like "grass". Any ideas?

  2. #2

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    0 Not allowed!
    All of these plants except water lettuce are easy low light plants. Water lettuce technically is easy to grow too but gets big and for some reason tends to fail to thrive in aquaria. A good substitute would be frogbit or dwarf water lettuce.

    All of them will survive low light except the water lettuce. The water lettuce floats, the crypt grows in the substrate and both anubias and java fern root on hard surfaces. None require co2 injection to survive, but all will do much better with it.

    As a hardy grasslike foreground plant I would recommend Sagittaria subulata.

  3. #3

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    0 Not allowed!
    The Java fern is low light and I have mine tied to a piece of slate with fishing line.
    The Anubias Barteri can be set in substrate but leave the rhizome above the substrate or you can also tie it to something with fishing line. Again mine has done well in low to medium light. If you have enough light for an amazon sword, the two I mentioned above will be fine under that light.
    I have no experience with the other two.
    As for a grass type plant, the ones I experimented with needed stronger light than I had. I didn't have any luck with the ones I tried.
    Warning; Bulldog Pleco guarding my Sons tank now..

    Please remember; every keystroke has a consequence.

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I actually like the dwarf water lettuce better then the regular one.

    I have had the amazon sword for only a few days now.It's about 10 inches tall.Seems to be doing fine.(would I even notice a difference in a few days if it was not enough light?)

    Does the Sagittaria subulata "spread" because I would like to have a nice patch of it in my tank and I cant see myself spending 40 bucks to get 8 of them lol.

  5. #5

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    0 Not allowed!
    One issue you may notice, and should not worry about: it is normal/common for Amazon swords to lose the existing leaves (they will slowly yellow and die) within the first few weeks after you acquire them. This can be due to the change in environment (light, nutrients, temperature). Second cause: If you bought the plants from a store and they were not there for some time in with fish, they are probably the emersed form. Nurserys grow swords emersed because it is faster and less expensive. These plants are bog or marsh plants in their habitat, living half the year emersed as terrestrial plants in marshy or wet ground, and the other half submersed during the rain/flood season. The leaves are different between emersed and submersed, so when permanently submersed the emersed leaves will die off. This is perfectly natural. As long as new leaves are appearing from the centre of the crown, the plant is fine. You can remove the yellowing leaves whenever you like; I would leave them for a time at first until there are several new green leaves, since some of the nutrients in the leaves of aquatic plants are what we term mobile, and include nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. So if there is still some green in the yellowing leaves, the plant can move these nutrients into new growth.

    Sword plants benefit from substrate fertilizer tabs, one next to the plant. Otherwise, liquid fertilizer will work, and for all plants listed. Not sure if we've discussed this previously, but Seachem's Flourish Comprehensive Supplementis a complete liquid fertilizer.

    On the Sagittaria subulata, I find this a very slow plant, at least by comparison to my similar Helanthium tenellum and Helanthium bolivianus, the two "chain" swords. I belive this is largely due to light, so if light is low/moderate, you might want to try the chain swords.

    Last comment, there is no difference botanically between Water Lettuce and so-called Dwarf Water Lattuce. It is the same plant, Pistia stratiotes. Under optimum conditions (light and nutrients) it grows large. With less optimum conditions, it will remain smaller. I have this in three tanks; it was purchased in the "dwarf" form, and I am keenly observing it grow differently from tank to tank. I had it a few years ago in my outdoor pond, until the racoon ate it. It grew large outdoors.

    Byron.

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    That is good to hear that I am not killing my plant. I just bought some Root tabs for the plants.

    I will try the chain plant instead then if it grows better with lower light.

    I must have been looking at the wrong plants then(googled it) but I did just order dwarf water lettuce on ebay(so now I know what they look like)

    I Just removed my UGF due to the live plants going in(I read it causes problems with some plants like the amazon sword and can cause problems with loaches) .I have a marineland penguin 350 filter and I am planning on adding another one for more filtration(to compensate for the UGF) . Is it TOO much for the plants to handle?I like having too much filtration rather than not enough xD.

  7. #7

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Whiskers19 View Post
    That is good to hear that I am not killing my plant. I just bought some Root tabs for the plants.

    I will try the chain plant instead then if it grows better with lower light.

    I must have been looking at the wrong plants then(googled it) but I did just order dwarf water lettuce on ebay(so now I know what they look like)

    I Just removed my UGF due to the live plants going in(I read it causes problems with some plants like the amazon sword and can cause problems with loaches) .I have a marineland penguin 350 filter and I am planning on adding another one for more filtration(to compensate for the UGF) . Is it TOO much for the plants to handle?I like having too much filtration rather than not enough xD.
    There is no point to "over-filtration." Plants on their own can filter the tank, assuming the fish load and everything is balanced. A filter sufficient for the tank will suffice.

    UGF is reasonably good filtration, which most of us grew up with, but it does carry some issues that one has to be aware of; and it is not the best with plants.

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