Aquarium Forum
 


Menu
  · Tropical Fish Home
· Fish News
· Aquarium Forum
· Buy & Sell
· Calculators
· Equipment reviews
· Free Aquarium Ebook
· Feedback
· Link to us
· Photo gallery
· Plant species
· Tropica Plant DB
Tropical fish species
· By Common name
· By Scientific name
Tropical Marine fish
· By Common name
· By Scientific name

_________________
 
      
        Via paypal

  AC news is a part of
      Nature Blog Network

      Reef Aquarium Blog

Privacy & Ad Policy

Articles
  · African Cichlids
· Algae Control
· Aquarium Decoration
· Aquarium Resources
· Aquatic Plants
· Barb Fish
· Betta Fish
· Breeding Fish
· Catfish
· Central American Cichlids
· Cichlids
· Clownfish
· Corals
· Corydoras Catfish
· Discus Fish
· Dwarf Cichlids
· Fish Diseases
· Frogs and Turtles
· Goby Fish
· Goldfish
· Gourami
· Invertebrates
· Jellyfish
· Killiefish
· Lake Victoria Cichlids
· Livebearers
· Malawi Cichlids
· Marine Aquariums
· Marine Aquarium Fish
· Other Fish
· Pleco
· Predatory Fish
· Photography
· Pond Fish
· Responsible Fish Keeping
· Rainbow Fish
· Shark Fish
· South American Cichlids
· Tanganyika Cichlids
· Tetra Fish
· Tropical Fish Food
Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 74
  1. #21

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Good water changes is more important than adding on more filters, which Byron have already mentioned.

    Since you're set on making this successful. Let's look at the issue of plants as you may know, not all plants will tolerate the temperature required to keep growing discus fishes.

    I'm not completely sure what you have in your tank now as I can't see it very clearly (looks like some anubias, possibly crypts, some hygro?, camboba, moneyworth, and a few other things), but there may be a need to change out some plants.

    Swords, crypts, hygros, valls, and some others can tolerate the high temperature better than other plants.
    Think with logic and rationality more than emotion. Act with moderation and consideration. Contemplate ideals and realistic goals and weigh out possibilities and options. Temper not with personal delusions or false hope but learn to accept and move on.

  2. #22

    Default


    2 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by rubema View Post
    3- Clean water is not an option, its a must. I do have now 4 filters (Eheim pro 3 1200xl, Eheim classic 600, x2 Led canister filter 1200 L/H). Should i add another one so i will be sure 100% that my water is always clear and dealing very will with fish/food... wastes? (Money not an issue).
    First of all, Rubema, you are always completely receptive to our advice no matter how confusing or complicated it is. Bravo to you for being willing to do what is best for your fish.

    In the future you may be under less stress if you learn as much as you can about the fish before getting it, that way you have less to fix in an emergency and are a little better prepared ahead of time.

    I also just wanted to clarify the filtration question. As others have said. There is a difference between mechanical filtration and biological filtration. When we are saying that discus require extremely clean water, that is a reference mostly to biological filtration. The beneficial bacteria turn ammonia into nitrite and then nitrite into nitrate. You are the final step in that process. The only way to remove nitrate from the tank is via a water change no additional filtration will do that for you.
    ~Manna
    10 gallon live planted aquarium with 6 neons
    90 gallon fw community in progress

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by CrunchyLeaf View Post
    First of all, Rubema, you are always completely receptive to our advice no matter how confusing or complicated it is. Bravo to you for being willing to do what is best for your fish.

    In the future you may be under less stress if you learn as much as you can about the fish before getting it, that way you have less to fix in an emergency and are a little better prepared ahead of time.

    I also just wanted to clarify the filtration question. As others have said. There is a difference between mechanical filtration and biological filtration. When we are saying that discus require extremely clean water, that is a reference mostly to biological filtration. The beneficial bacteria turn ammonia into nitrite and then nitrite into nitrate. You are the final step in that process. The only way to remove nitrate from the tank is via a water change no additional filtration will do that for you.
    Thank you CrunchyLeat, for your nice words, i really appreciate..
    And thank you every one try to help me with that issue, i also appreciate your great advice's.

    Will do now another water change, and test the Nitrate again, i hope it will be less than yesterday.

    Meanwhile some of members advice me to check the PH in my tank and compare it with my tap water. The result was as the picture below, which seems like the ph in tap water (Left) is higher than what the ph result in the tank water (Right).

    Any advice here???

    Thank you


    b1bz.jpg

  4. #24

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Did you test it straight out of tap or did you try to age the water (let it sit out wade through the water so that it diffuse any gas/pressure in it)?
    Think with logic and rationality more than emotion. Act with moderation and consideration. Contemplate ideals and realistic goals and weigh out possibilities and options. Temper not with personal delusions or false hope but learn to accept and move on.

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Spardas View Post
    Did you test it straight out of tap or did you try to age the water (let it sit out wade through the water so that it diffuse any gas/pressure in it)?
    I filled the tester bottle directly from the tap.

  6. #26

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Can you try to age your water first and see if you get different results?
    Think with logic and rationality more than emotion. Act with moderation and consideration. Contemplate ideals and realistic goals and weigh out possibilities and options. Temper not with personal delusions or false hope but learn to accept and move on.

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Spardas View Post
    Can you try to age your water first and see if you get different results?
    Iam sorry, but can you please tell me how to age my water??
    I am totally...

  8. #28

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Aging water is just letting it sit overnight to let things evaporate from it - honestly, I've never heard of anyone doing that nowadays - testing water from the tap implies testing it right out of the tap - unless letting it sit like that produces a more accurate reading?

    Just chiming in here : )
    46 gal fw tank with black skirt tetras, neon tetras, spotted corys, cherry barbs, otoclinus, snails & 4 amano shrimp - plastic & live plants
    5 gal QT
    Remember: Our job is to take care of the water our fish live in

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by imma24 View Post
    Aging water is just letting it sit overnight to let things evaporate from it - honestly, I've never heard of anyone doing that nowadays - testing water from the tap implies testing it right out of the tap - unless letting it sit like that produces a more accurate reading?

    Just chiming in here : )
    :) Got it!!!
    Will do that test today before bed time, and update tomorrow.
    I don't want to hijack the thread title, but do you think covering the Filter Intake, with fine/medium pad, is good way, or it will effect the BB in filter media?

  10. #30

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by imma24 View Post
    Aging water is just letting it sit overnight to let things evaporate from it - honestly, I've never heard of anyone doing that nowadays - testing water from the tap implies testing it right out of the tap - unless letting it sit like that produces a more accurate reading?

    Just chiming in here : )
    When testing tap water for pH, you need to out-gas the CO2 or the reading may be inaccurate, and on the low side. CO2 enters the water as it comes through the lines, and the level of CO2 can vary. CO2 creates carbonic acid so the pH naturally becomes more acidic.

    You can let a glass of water sit 24 hours; the CO2 will dissipate from the water at the surface. Or you can shake the water very briskly for a few minutes to out-gas the CO2.

    Depending upon how much CO2 is in the water, the out-gassing may result in a higher pH reading.

    To carry this to the aquarium, when you fill the tank at a water change, much of this CO2 will dissipate out because of the action of filling the tank, or subsequently over the next few hours.

    This is why some people when testing without out-gassing will find the pH of the tap water at say 7.6 but in the aquarium it is 8.2, but when they out-gas the tap they find it too is actually 8.2, or whatever.

    Byron.
    Last edited by Byron; 09-16-2013 at 05:56 PM.
    Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
    Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •