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Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. Default Can peacock gudgeon handle salt?


    0 Not allowed!
    Hi, my peacock gudgeon is sometimes rubbing himself on the sand. I havent found out why yet, but i prepare for an ich-cure with salt and higher temperature. I dont know if it is ich yet, but i want to be prepared if thats the case. But my question is if the peacock gudgeon can handle the salt?

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Given that this fish inhabits very soft waters on the East side of Papua New Guinea, I would not risk salt. Raising the temperature can deal with ich if it is high enough, close to 90F, but I am not sure if this species can handle that or not.

    When I have ich with very sensitive fish that can't handle the high temperature, I use CopperSafe. I've never lost fish to this.

    First thing though is to be certain it is ich. Though CopperSafe will deal with other parasites too. But scraping their flanks on the substrate can mean other things, like water parameters or water conditions. Have you tested for ammonia, nitrite and nitrate? And what is the pH and GH?

    Flashing due to ich starts in the gill region first, as the ich parasite first attacks the gills. You won't see spots on the fish at this point, unless the infestation increases. My first "cure" is always a water change, 50-75% of the tank using a good conditioner. It is amazing how this can be sufficient. And of course, avoid any stress to the fish. Ich and most disease is due to stress, which weakens the fish's immune system so they can't fight these things off.

    Byron.
    Last edited by Byron; 09-05-2013 at 11:33 PM.

  3. #3

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I have kept and bred a lot of peacock gobies. The first thing I want to ask is if you are sure they are scratching themselves and that it is not a breeding behaviour. Males tend to rubb themselves against rocks in close proximity to females as a courtship ritual. The eggs are then laid and guarded in a narrow cravice.

    Some strains can handle salt, other can not. Using salt will in other words be a gamble. I would try the methods recommend by byron above before risking using salt.
    Do as I say. Not as I do.

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Well, I have shrimp so I don't think it's good to treat my peacock with copper :/
    But I have found out that Easylife Anti-spot+Easylife Multicura would work, and according to a user on another forum, those things don't hurt the shrimps or the snails. Should I buy them, or should I wait some days to se if it gets worse? I bought this fish yesterday, so maybe it could be the differences in PH that bothers it or something?

  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by FeliciaC View Post
    Well, I have shrimp so I don't think it's good to treat my peacock with copper :/
    But I have found out that Easylife Anti-spot+Easylife Multicura would work, and according to a user on another forum, those things don't hurt the shrimps or the snails. Should I buy them, or should I wait some days to se if it gets worse? I bought this fish yesterday, so maybe it could be the differences in PH that bothers it or something?
    CopperSafe is mild by comparison to other copper-based medications, which is why it is good for sensitive fish. But having said that, I cannot comment on shrimp.

    As for the two products mentioned, I am not familiar with them, but the info on the website does not indicate what they contain, and copper is common in most anti-ich meds. As for the other that is "broad spectrum," this may well do more harm than good. Not all fish can take all medications, and any so-called "broad spectrum" are usually either ineffective or problematic for some fish.

    As I said earlier, one should never treat with any preparation unless it is fairly certain that the disease is present. William suggested other possibilities. And too quick an adjustment to a new environment/water parameters can cause trouble too. If one has reason to think that parameters may be significantly different, acclimation should be done very slowly.

    Byron.

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I dont have any problems with ammonia or nitrite. My shrimps are healthy, and the other fishes too. I have now seen my female peacock rubbing herself too, so I guess something is wrong with them. I know I bought the fishes at a place where the water is softer and the ph is lower so maybe thats whats wrong.

    But my plan is to wait until sunday to see if it gets better or worse, they doesnt flash often at all. If it gets worse, I will try the heat-treatment for ich without the salt.

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