Aquarium Forum
 


Menu
  · Tropical Fish Home
· Fish News
· Aquarium Forum
· Buy & Sell
· Calculators
· Equipment reviews
· Free Aquarium Ebook
· Feedback
· Link to us
· Photo gallery
· Plant species
· Tropica Plant DB
Tropical fish species
· By Common name
· By Scientific name
Tropical Marine fish
· By Common name
· By Scientific name

_________________
 
      
        Via paypal

  AC news is a part of
      Nature Blog Network

      Reef Aquarium Blog

Privacy & Ad Policy

Articles
  · African Cichlids
· Algae Control
· Aquarium Decoration
· Aquarium Resources
· Aquatic Plants
· Barb Fish
· Betta Fish
· Breeding Fish
· Catfish
· Central American Cichlids
· Cichlids
· Clownfish
· Corals
· Corydoras Catfish
· Discus Fish
· Dwarf Cichlids
· Fish Diseases
· Frogs and Turtles
· Goby Fish
· Goldfish
· Gourami
· Invertebrates
· Jellyfish
· Killiefish
· Lake Victoria Cichlids
· Livebearers
· Malawi Cichlids
· Marine Aquariums
· Marine Aquarium Fish
· Other Fish
· Pleco
· Predatory Fish
· Photography
· Pond Fish
· Responsible Fish Keeping
· Rainbow Fish
· Shark Fish
· South American Cichlids
· Tanganyika Cichlids
· Tetra Fish
· Tropical Fish Food
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. Default Breeding German Blue Rams


    0 Not allowed!
    So my GBR's laid eggs about a week ago. They lasted almost a day and a half before i woke up one morning and they had been eaten. I was not surprised at this only that i thought they might actually hatch because the parents had kept them at least one night. I am kind of preparing myself for the next batch because i know i have a breeding pair and i was wondering what i should do. Should i keep the eggs in with the parents, take them out, if so what do i put them in, or what to feed them/what to do with them when they become free swimming. I appreciate any help. thanks
    (I dont really want to set up another tank)
    MY tank: 2 GBR's 2 EBR's 6 rasbora hets 1 cory

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Assuming the "My Tank" info is correct and you have the other fish, especially the cory, I would suggest the cory ate the eggs.

    Rams "rest" (sleep some would say) in darkness. Corys, like most catfish are nocturnal. At night the eggs cannot be adequately protected by the parents and are easy pickings. I have had spawnings by Bolivian Rams disappear on the first night, second night, once they even hatched but the fry got eaten at night. So it is hit and miss, depending where the parents lay the eggs. If you definitely want to raise the fry, I would set up a separate tank, a 24-inch 15 or 20g will suffice.

    And before anyone suggests it, do not leave lights on at night in the hope this will save them. Light of any sort during the "night" is highly stressful on all fish. They need a period of complete darkness to rest, just like we do. People who leave tank lights on 24/7 usually end up with ich because of the stress to the poor fish.

    Byron.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I never thought about the cory. The eggs were on top of a rock that stood straight up but even then. Would one of those marina breeder boxes work that pump the water into them?
    MY tank: 2 GBR's 2 EBR's 6 rasbora hets 1 cory

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Your best bet is another tank and let the parents attempt to raise the fry. If they fail, the next batch, you can try to raise it yourself once they go free swimming.
    Think with logic and rationality more than emotion. Act with moderation and consideration. Contemplate ideals and realistic goals and weigh out possibilities and options. Temper not with personal delusions or false hope but learn to accept and move on.

  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    It is extremely common that the breeding pair themselves will eat the eggs during their first spawning. The same often happen the second and third time as well. After that it quickly improves. 90%+ of all the pairs i have bred have eaten their first batch. Usually when they are 24-48 hours old.

    I would expect them to breed again in 10-14 days
    Do as I say. Not as I do.

  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    It is extremely common that the breeding pair themselves will eat the eggs during their first spawning. The same often happen the second and third time as well. After that it quickly improves. 90%+ of all the pairs i have bred have eaten their first batch. Usually when they are 24-48 hours old.

    I would expect them to breed again in 10-14 days
    I agree. I once had a pair that ate their eggs 9 times before I saw any fry.

    Liters to Gallons conversion calculator

    "Keeping fish for any period of time doesn't make you experienced if you're doing it wrong. What does, is acknowledging those mistakes and learning from them." ~Aeonflame
    "
    your argument is invalid." ~Mommy1


  7. #7

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I don't disagree that the parents may eat the eggs, but the cory is still the most likely. I was sitting in front of my tank once during the day and observing the female M. ramirezi (not the Bolivians this time) shepherding her fry. Suddenly one cory found them, and within seconds there were a couple more and the fry were gone. The female had no chance. At night, one cory could easily devour the egss in a few seconds with the female imobile. I still suggest separating them if you want success.

    I've never had cichlids other than angels eat their spawn, but I accept I may have been lucky, and my spawnings are probably fewer than others, but I am talking both ram species and several apisto species.

    Byron.

  8. #8

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    The cories are a real possibility. However the time frame of a day and a half also fit very good with when rams usually eat their eggs. Rams are the only fish that showed this behaviour for me. Never had any problems with angels. Wonder if it is just luck or if it have something to do with differences in how we setup tanks.

    Regardless of the culprit in this case i agree with the recommendation to setup a seperate tank if he wants to rasie fry. They will have a very low survival propibility in the community tank.
    Do as I say. Not as I do.

  9. #9

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I have learned that wild angelfish do not (or very rarely) eat their spawn, from first on. Tank-raised fish (I am told) usually do, or are quick to do so with any annoyance. It is quite possible this may extend to other cichlids too, and my ram and apisto success might have been due to them being wild caught. Just a thought.

    This may be yet another effect of tank-rearing soft water fish in water that is harder than they prefer. We know they tend ot lose colour compared to wild fish, and spawning is often very difficult. So unusual practices if they do spawn are conceivable. Just another thought.

    Byron.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •