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Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. Default The waiting game


    0 Not allowed!
    Hi all. As I've posted before, I'm in the process of fishless cycling my 46 gallon bowfront. And am quickly discovering I am not good at this waiting game! As a biology major I understand the nitrogen cycle quite well, and as a humane society employee and someone who cares for the well being of animals, I don't want to put fish through the stress of toxic qualities in their tank. And so, I sit here watching my completely decorated tank bubble with no fish (oddly, even an empty tank can be relaxing to watch). I am impatient for my cycle to finish (patience is a virtue I do not possess haha).

    Started my cycle 18 days ago (yes I know, cycling will take longer than that but one can hope to have the tank that will defy logic haha). Dosed the tank to 4ppm Ammonia. Waited 3 days before testing again and was very excited to see my ammonia was at 2ppm! Unfortunately it has stayed there since. (thinking maybe the hour I had let it run before the first ammonia test may not have been long enough to circulate completely?) Nitrites and nitrates are 0 and have consistently been 0. Five days ago I seeded my tank with a large amount of used filter floss from my LFS in the hopes that would speed up my cycle. Continued testing nightly since then and....nothing. No change. I know I'm being impatient but I was really hoping to see SOMETHING change by now.

    More info: 46 gallon bowfront running an Aquaclear 110 power filter plus an airstone. Not using live plants. Temperature is steady around 84. pH has stayed around 7.2

    Don't have any specific questions in this post, just wanted to vent about my impatience and hear other people's stories of their fishless cycle experiences :-)
    46 gallon bowfront: 1 angelfish, 1 GBR, 1 albino longfin BNP, 3 sunset mickey mouse platies, 3 blue mickey mouse platies, 9 cherry barbs, 9 harlequin rasboras

    29 gallon dwarf puffer tank

    Scheming show tank #3....

    10 gallon pond snail breeding tank

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    You're well into the cycle, so I am not suggesting a change. But just for info, the next time you or anyone sets up a new tank, you can avoid "cycling" altogether by having live plants. Fast-growing are needed, and the easiest of these are floating plants. Once the tank is running, with plants, just add a few fish and gradually increase. There is no discernable "cycle" to us--or the fish--although the bacteria does appear as always but slower and without causing any stress.

    The plants need nitrogen, and they prefer it as ammonium which they obtain by grabbing the ammonia. Plants actually out-compete bacteria in this, which is why the bacteria will be slower to establish. I've set up dozens of tanks, new or re-established with new substrates, using plants and never had problems with ammonia or nitrite.

    Byron.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    What kinds of floating plants? And with floating plants do they need a special light or would the full spectrum light I have be fine? And what about fertilizers for them etc? I've heard that live plants can be difficult to keep.

    Would be too late or screw up my cycle to add plants now?
    46 gallon bowfront: 1 angelfish, 1 GBR, 1 albino longfin BNP, 3 sunset mickey mouse platies, 3 blue mickey mouse platies, 9 cherry barbs, 9 harlequin rasboras

    29 gallon dwarf puffer tank

    Scheming show tank #3....

    10 gallon pond snail breeding tank

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by phin9009 View Post
    What kinds of floating plants? And with floating plants do they need a special light or would the full spectrum light I have be fine? And what about fertilizers for them etc? I've heard that live plants can be difficult to keep.

    Would be too late or screw up my cycle to add plants now?
    No, the plants can be added. I wouldn't increase the ammonia any further though, and if you do add plants, I would do a partial water change to get rid of most of the ammonia.

    Plants are no more difficult than fish. The complexity of high-tech methods is what makes plants sound like a big deal, but you can have plants with minimal fuss. Decent light is the main concern, and what you have may be fine. If you could provide some data on the light (be specific) I can comment further.

    As for nutrients, many of these come from the fish foods and water changes. A single dose once a week of a comprehensive liquid fertilizer is usually all that is required, if that. Carbon from CO2 (carbon dioxide) is often said to be necessary, but this is not true; I have never added carbon to any of my tanks, and they are fairly heavily planted.

    As for floating plants, my favourite is Ceratopteris cornuta (Water Sprite, India Fern are common names). Some stem plants make good floaters, especially Brazilian Pennywort. Duckweed works too, though I prefer one of the others because they have more "substance" and provide more interest for the fish and us.

    Byron.

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I like the look of the Brazilian pennywort...how do I go about doing floating plants? I will get more info on my light when I get home
    46 gallon bowfront: 1 angelfish, 1 GBR, 1 albino longfin BNP, 3 sunset mickey mouse platies, 3 blue mickey mouse platies, 9 cherry barbs, 9 harlequin rasboras

    29 gallon dwarf puffer tank

    Scheming show tank #3....

    10 gallon pond snail breeding tank

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Eclipse 36 inch...natural daylight F30T8

    Is this sufficient for a floating plant such as the pennywort?
    46 gallon bowfront: 1 angelfish, 1 GBR, 1 albino longfin BNP, 3 sunset mickey mouse platies, 3 blue mickey mouse platies, 9 cherry barbs, 9 harlequin rasboras

    29 gallon dwarf puffer tank

    Scheming show tank #3....

    10 gallon pond snail breeding tank

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Also...I have a power filter, will floating plants be ok with the water fall outflow of the filter?
    46 gallon bowfront: 1 angelfish, 1 GBR, 1 albino longfin BNP, 3 sunset mickey mouse platies, 3 blue mickey mouse platies, 9 cherry barbs, 9 harlequin rasboras

    29 gallon dwarf puffer tank

    Scheming show tank #3....

    10 gallon pond snail breeding tank

  8. #8

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I'm not familiar myself with the light mentioned, but I would assume it will be fine for floating plants. The "natural daylight" bit should indicate a good spectrum. Lower plants would have to be selected with moderate to low light in mind, but floaters don't have this problem.

    There are ways to keep floating plants away from filter outflows. If you can't adjust it somehow, other methods will work. With Pennywort for instance, being a stem plant that wil simply grow longer and longer, you can fasten the cut end of the stems on the opposite side of the tank from the filter, and it will grow along the surface.

    Byron.

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    So I just rinse the plants and let them float on the surface...? I can lower the flow rate so it's not as strong of a current created but that's about all I can do. I could find a way to attach it to the other side though...
    46 gallon bowfront: 1 angelfish, 1 GBR, 1 albino longfin BNP, 3 sunset mickey mouse platies, 3 blue mickey mouse platies, 9 cherry barbs, 9 harlequin rasboras

    29 gallon dwarf puffer tank

    Scheming show tank #3....

    10 gallon pond snail breeding tank

  10. #10

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by phin9009 View Post
    So I just rinse the plants and let them float on the surface...? I can lower the flow rate so it's not as strong of a current created but that's about all I can do. I could find a way to attach it to the other side though...
    Yes. You can plant them in the substrate and allow them to grow up and then along the surface, or just leave them floating. With the former, sometimes the leaves on the lower parts yellow and die, so this method usually requires regular uprooting and trimming. But for floating, it is best to just let them float.

    Separate the stems so they are not tangled, otherwise it can be quite a mess. Individually, the leaves will grow facing up and get larger. One way to secure the cut ends is with one of those heater or filter suction cups. You can get these in a package (they do wear out in time and need replacing) and stick it where you want it in the rear corner, then fasten the stems however you like.

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