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Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: First dead fish

  1. Default First dead fish


    0 Not allowed!
    Week 4 and 3 days of cycling and I have my first dead fish. The remaining 2 appear ok but so did the first one until today. The deceased fish was the largest of the 3. I think it had dropsy? If it were a human I would say that the area on the bottom of the fish where the head connected to the body (around the pelvic fin area) became enlarged with 2 red dots. At first I thought it had an internal tumor. I bagged it and drove to my lfs but it died on the way. The minute I put it in the bag though, it started swimming upside down and having problems oriented itself. The other 2 seem okay and I did another 1/2 tank water change. Anything else I should do or watch for?

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Have you been able to test the ammonia/nitrite/nitrate levels?

    You did the right thing by doing a water change. Dropsy, if that's what it was, is generally caused by bad water conditions. You should monitor for general fish behavior/diseases. Check for general lethargy, curved spines, drooping/clamped fins, etc.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I still get the rising ammonia (which is why I am doing the constant water changes).....still no nitrites or nitrates. I think the problem probably started because I was unable to do a water change for 48 hours last weekend. Would it show up in the largest fish first?

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    How high did the ammonia levels get and how large are the water changes you have been doing ?
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cliff View Post
    How high did the ammonia levels get and how large are the water changes you have been doing ?
    +1

    and what are you testing with
    i hear some people say, "i kept a goldfish in a bowl and it lived for a year."
    they don't know how lucky they were and all goldfish live at least 15 years in proper conditions.
    that is equal to saying my human lived in his closet for 5 years!

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I usually change the water when it gets to 0.25 but last weekend it got to either .50 or close to 1.0 (to be honest, I'm 53 and my eyes really have problems telling the difference between the lime color of 0.5 and 1.0. I test with the API Master Test. I change 50% of the water and always use a dechlorinator.

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    .50 or 1ppm is enough to do damage, particularly in sensitive fish ( I have not been around here lately enough to know what sort of fish you have). But rather than straight up ammonia poisoning, I'd bet the stress from the high level triggered another illness.

    It's kind of like, when people get stressed, we will develop other things in response, like back pain or a cold or whatever. Unfortunately for little fish, a relatively minor illness can be fatal really fast. Even constipation - not really a big human deal, but lethal for fish if it goes on for a while.

    Just keep up with the water changes and see how things go. If you lose more fish, you probably have some sort of communicable disease that'll need attention. Often, though, clean water is enough to help tremendously.

    Have you thought about using a bacterial additive to speed up cycling? I know the jury is out on whether these help (I feel they do), but it wouldn't hurt. Or do you have plants? That can help a lot too - plants will slow the buildup of ammonia while you're cycling. Sometimes heavily planted tanks cycle silently - as in, no spikes of anything except nitrates.
    Beth
    1 - 55 gallon planted community
    3 - 10 to 20 gallon planted betta tanks
    My advice: slow down, think, and be willing to learn. Then you'll be fine, no matter what.

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I have raspbora danios. I tried some Quick Start initially

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