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Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. Default Led down the wrong path.. could use a little help.


    0 Not allowed!
    I had been planning on starting a tank for my 7 month old boy and decided these fish would be great due to color and size etc ( not great research on my part) I was so busy I relied on the pet shop owner to guide me, I had already purchased a 30 gal Half moon tank and I was told that the Golden Mbuna would do well in the tank, also that gravel was better than sand. When I asked about the environment I was advised that anything would be fine, that some plastic plants would do the trick as long as they had a little cover. Also I was told I should start with two and add more later so I picked a Golden Mbuna and a Blue with black vertical striped one that I liked. Well the next morning the blue was mysteriously dead and the Golden was as happy as a lark, after reading this it seems that my tank is not only way too small but everything about it is just plain wrong.. ugghh Now to go about the overhaul as gently as possible.. what a pain. At least the one fish seems happy enough for now .. he just hangs out around the bottom most of the time among the dense areas. Should I stock with maybe five of them and be prepared to either move them to another tank down the road or will shop owners allow a trade for new fish? I would hate to give him up just yet and if it takes a few years for them to outgrow the tank I would rather stock with several and move them out later since my boy seems to be mesmerized by this Mbuna. Any ideas on how fast they grow and if my tank is large enough to fit another type of Mbuna ( equally aggressive) in there?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
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    Posts
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    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    tank is too small for multiple mbuna. they can be quite aggressive. a schoal of nice serpae tetras or something similiar would make your hobby much more enjoyable. if you're stuck on cichlids, there are many dwarf varieties which can be much more passive. you will have to do some research on smaller fish you like before we can really help you. there are so many...
    Thar she blows!!!

  3. #3

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Oh dear... another one. Well, he's right on one thing, plastic plants are ok.

    Have a read:

    http://www.seriouslyfish.com/species...romis-auratus/

    One of the most aggressive and territorial mbuna. It should not be kept with peace loving species, such as Peacocks or Utaka, but it can be combined with other mbuna provided they do not resemble it in patterning. The tank should be overcrowded to reduce aggression and territory formation. It is incredibly aggressive towards others of the same species, and the presence of heterospecifics helps to dissipate this. However, a very large tank is required in order to keep more than one male and even then it is likely that the sub-dominant male(s) will be killed. Several females should be kept per male in order to reduce harassment by the male but this in itself also presents problems, as unlike many mbuna, female M. auratus are also intolerant of congeners.


    Now check this:

    http://www.seriouslyfish.com/species...ologus-brevis/

    All the Africans prefer quite hard water with a stable ph of around 8. An easy way out for you would be to return the fish and get a few platies. Mild mannered, colourful and easy to keep. Also, do read up on cycling a tank.

    In any case, your baby will appreciate a fish DVD as well as a real tank for now.

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Hi. I don't raise or keep mumbas but do know that because they are so aggressive, it's best to keep your tank stocked a bit heavily so the aggression can be spread out among all of them which should keep any one fish from being bullies or killed. I'm sure a mumba expert will chime in

    BUT - we need to back up a bit. How long have you had the tank set up? Did you cycle it? (a process that takes 3 to 4 weeks using ammonia and 0 fish) If you haven't cycled the tank, I'd take the fish back, read the stickie in my signature line on cycling and take the time that the tank cycles to read up on fish and decide if you really want to tackle mumba as your first venture.
    There are great articles on compatibility and stocking here on the AC forum and members will be happy to answer your questions.
    Also, since your little guy is only 7 months old, I'm sure he'll soon forget about the fish that fascinates him now. If you want a fish in the tank while you're cycling, I saw some adorable fake fish at my LFS last week that you simply anchor to the bottom and they show all the motions of real fish. I'm thinking that would keep him happy until your tank is properly cycled and you have done more research and decided if mumbas are the way you want to go.
    Good luck! And continue to ask questions.
    30 g FW planted:corys, ABNP, blue angel, harleys, zebra danios, nerites & mystery snails
    15 g FW planted: crown tail betta, neons, snails
    90 g FW semi planted: Blood Parrots, severum, Jurupari, EBJD, congos, kribs, clown pleco, snails
    90 Gal Journal: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ad.php?t=93939
    Fishless cycling: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ead.php?t=5640
    Cycling with fish: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ad.php?t=36492

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Other people will ask you about your cycle and stuff but i'll chime in about the fish itself. The more known name on here for a golden mbuna is 'auratus', and they are quite infamous as you now know. You know that your tank is too small for a group of mbuna, but, if you like that fish there is no reason you couldn't keep him by himself. I think many new keepers are under the mistaken impression that mbuna or social fish, they are not. They are highly territorial and do just fine alone, we keep them in groups because of how pretty they are, and because with the right size aquarium and proper layout we can keep them in groups.

    The auratus will get quite large at around 5-6" and would be quite an impressive fish all by himself in a 30g. Just get some holley rock at your fish store, leave the fake plants, and he will be happy as can be. You could most likely even add a Synodontis petricola catfish. My mbuna don't even notice them.
    "At some point you aren't making the animal more dead...You are just making a bigger mess." - Demjor19

  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    A heavily armored bottom dweller is likely the only thing that can coexist with this fish. And, indeed, keeping it alone is certainly an option in this tank.

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    thank you all! Very good information and all taken into consideration. When I started the tank I was under the impression that I had to cycle for ( as stated and verified) 3-4 but the pet store owner said 48 hours was plenty due to the water in the are ( I was confused also but trusted her anyways) I used about tap water and R/0 water at a 60/40 then treated with API Conditioner and Stress Zyme ( plus some instant start) Water is still pretty hard at about 120 but the Kh is down between 60-80 and the PH is about 7.5. no nitrates. It has been a week and he seems to be very healthy ( I think I was just lucky) I have 2 - 10 gallon container and plan on storing a 60/40 mixture of tap and R/O water (Pre treated with the above mentioned products) and cycle out about 10% every one to two weeks. I am going to stay with the Cichlids but am leaning to returning my little friend sadly enough and pick up some less aggressive Dwarf's. I have already ordered some Cichlid stones ( 3) and already posses a large natural rock that I have had for years that has several holes and has a nice curvature that will create some perfect roomy hiding spaces for the fish. I feel like I am on the right path with this plan. Now to research some proper friends for my soon to be renovated aquarium.

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Your tank isn't cycled yet. Your fish has been ok because he's the only one in a 30g. You're at that stage where an ammonia spike is really due to happen. With only one fish a cycle in that tank will take at least a few weeks. I would head over to the cycling section and read up on the process in the stickys. What I would do if I were you is return the fish and finish your cycle using the fishless method. Then when thats done you could fully stock it right from the get go.
    "At some point you aren't making the animal more dead...You are just making a bigger mess." - Demjor19

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by FinalJenemba View Post
    Your tank isn't cycled yet. Your fish has been ok because he's the only one in a 30g. You're at that stage where an ammonia spike is really due to happen. With only one fish a cycle in that tank will take at least a few weeks. I would head over to the cycling section and read up on the process in the stickys. What I would do if I were you is return the fish and finish your cycle using the fishless method. Then when thats done you could fully stock it right from the get go.
    + + to this post. the links to cycling are in my signature line.
    30 g FW planted:corys, ABNP, blue angel, harleys, zebra danios, nerites & mystery snails
    15 g FW planted: crown tail betta, neons, snails
    90 g FW semi planted: Blood Parrots, severum, Jurupari, EBJD, congos, kribs, clown pleco, snails
    90 Gal Journal: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ad.php?t=93939
    Fishless cycling: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ead.php?t=5640
    Cycling with fish: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ad.php?t=36492

  10. #10

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    We've explained the importance of cycling several times. I think OP is one of those that does not want to listen.

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