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Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. Exclamation water change killing fish


    0 Not allowed!
    Hey guys, this is my first post, so please excuse me if this is in the wrong section or something. Anyway, i have a 10 gallon freshwater aquarium, full of a yoyo loach (to keep snails under control), 2 cardinal tetras, 2 danio glofish, and 2 tetra glofish. Recently, i went to do a water change, and noticed that the gravel had gotten very dirty over the time i have had the aquarium. well i wasn't particularly fond of how it was looking anyway, so i decided to go to the pet store, and buy myself some new gravel. Here is how i went about changing it out. i cyphened half of the existing water into a 12 gallon container, and filled another maybe 2 or 3 gallons of tap water. i then put in the declorinator chemicals to make it safe for the fish. from there i transfered the fish to the container, and dumped the rest of the water and gravel from the fish tank. After giving the tank a good scrub wince i dont normally have the oportunity to clean it like that, I added a scoop of the old gravel, then started adding the new substrate (i rinsed it first). from there, i cyphened half of the water from the container back into the aquarium, and filled the rest with tap water. again i put in the chemical, tho not much at all, and transfered my fish back into the aquarium. the next day, i came back and both of my cardinal tetras had died! i though it was weird that only that one species died. half way through the day, i saw that my glofish tetra had also died! I am very concerned for my fish. I thought it would be a good idea to test the water, and so i did, and everything looked fine except for the hardness, and the ph. the ph was at maybe 6, or 6.5 so i knew that wasn't awful, but could be a little better. But then i looked at the hardness, and it was off the charts. Now i have tested the water before this numerous times, and every time, the water was extremely hard, but i thought that i remembered someone at a fish store saying that hardness didn't matter that much. also i have a filter that has three stages, and one of them i think is supposed to preserve the beneficial bacteria when changing the other stages, so i thought that the tank would be fine even with that big of a water change. Also today, i have noticed the tank start to become a little bit cloudy. not bad, but defiantly not as good as yesterday. What should i do? If you notice anything wrong with my process, please let me know so that i can not do it again, and possibly help out the tank now. thanks everyone, and a response would be greatly appreciated.!

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    498

    Awards Showcase

    Blog Entries
    1
    【ツ】 - korith first fish for your community tank! - Cyberra a friend for your other neon ;) - Cyberra tetra #3 ;) - Cyberra looks like you like neons.... i hope - genocidex 
    because sometimes they school - genocidex a good school of neons is 6 minimal !!!!! - genocidex for playing along, gift of my choice!!!! - genocidex These seem to be quite popular... - ~firefly~ ...so here's another one... - ~firefly~ 
    ...and for luck, one more. - ~firefly~ 
    Arthritis - Child Abuse - Colon Cancer - Colorectal Cancer - Dystonia - Education - Free Speech - Interstitial Cystitis - ME/CFIDS - Reye's Syndrome - Save the Music - Teens Against Smoking - Victim's Rights - Water Quality - Flyby Stardancer 

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Tetras can be rather sensitive to changes in water chemistry. The shock of being just put into water that's very different than what they're used to can kill them.

    And you have some major stocking problems. I ran your stocking through AquaAdvisor (since I'm a beginner hobbyist myself and not as familiar with the different species) and I got this:

    Recommendations/Warnings/Suggestions/Notes:

    Note: Yoyo Loach on rare occasions will reach up to 10 inches in size.
    Warning: Yoyo Loach is not recommended for your tank - it may eventually outgrow your tank space, potentially reaching up to 6 inches.
    Warning: At least 3 x Yoyo Loach are recommended in a group.
    Warning: Glowlight Tetra may become food for Yoyo Loach.
    Warning: Yoyo Loach is too aggressive to co-exist with Cardinal Tetra.
    Warning: At least 5 x Glowlight Tetra are recommended in a group.
    Warning: Yoyo Loach is too aggressive to co-exist with Glowlight Tetra.
    Warning: At least 5 x Cardinal Tetra are recommended in a group.

    Warning: At least 5 x Glo Fish are recommended in a group.
    Did you cycle your tank to build up beneficial bacteria? How did you cycle it? Did you let the filter media dry out?
    1. 2. (No Picture)
    1: Planted Betta Tank 1, Grimsby (male betta)
    2: Planted Betta Tank 2
    3: Eclipse QT Tank

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Ok, I have some questions to help figure out what's going on:
    1. When did you get the tank?
    2. Did you cycle?
    3. Did you add all the fish at once, or did you add them slowly over time?
    4. Did you use anything other than water to clean the tank?
    5. Just out of curiosity, why did you add ack a scoop of the old gravel?
    6. You said that once you cleaned the tank, you ciphoned half the water back into the tank, topped it up with tap water, and added "not much at all" conditioner. Was it at least enough to treat the amount of water that you added?
    7. Did you let any of the filter media dry out while you were cleaning the tank?
    8. Did your fish look sickly at all before this?

    Now, I'll just add a few things that I thought of while reading your post. First, the size of a water change doesn't really matter as long as the water quality doesn't dramatically improve. You can even do a 75% water change and, as long as the water wasn't super-dirty before the change, you would be fine. This is because beneficial bacteria don't live in the water itself, so taking out the water does nothing. Also, more important than correct paramaters (to an extent) is consistency. So if your water is really dirty, and if it suddenly becomes super clean after a large water change, it'll shock your fish.

    That sort of leads into my next point. I'm not 100% sure about this, but I think tetras and danios come from soft, slightly acidic water. Now, since most fish are never raised in their own environments, it's probably ok for them to be in harder water as long as it's consistent. However, if you say your water is extremely hard, then I'd be inclined to say that that's probably what did them in.
    Joseph Granata
    My decommissioned 37gal freshwater community tank journal: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...d.php?t=116054
    My current 37gal FOWLR tank journal: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...42#post1214342

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Flyby, good thing you mentioned the stocking issues. I was gonna address that but then I forgot.
    Joseph Granata
    My decommissioned 37gal freshwater community tank journal: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...d.php?t=116054
    My current 37gal FOWLR tank journal: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...42#post1214342

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    498

    Awards Showcase

    Blog Entries
    1
    【ツ】 - korith first fish for your community tank! - Cyberra a friend for your other neon ;) - Cyberra tetra #3 ;) - Cyberra looks like you like neons.... i hope - genocidex 
    because sometimes they school - genocidex a good school of neons is 6 minimal !!!!! - genocidex for playing along, gift of my choice!!!! - genocidex These seem to be quite popular... - ~firefly~ ...so here's another one... - ~firefly~ 
    ...and for luck, one more. - ~firefly~ 
    Arthritis - Child Abuse - Colon Cancer - Colorectal Cancer - Dystonia - Education - Free Speech - Interstitial Cystitis - ME/CFIDS - Reye's Syndrome - Save the Music - Teens Against Smoking - Victim's Rights - Water Quality - Flyby Stardancer 

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I've noticed in my short time here that stocking issues come up a lot. :) And while I can't just look at a list of someone's stock to identify problems, AquaAdvisor seems to be a good guide to picking out the worst problems.
    1. 2. (No Picture)
    1: Planted Betta Tank 1, Grimsby (male betta)
    2: Planted Betta Tank 2
    3: Eclipse QT Tank

  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    if you see gunk on your gravel you don't have to change your gravel.
    use a gravel vacuum and get it out.
    what are you ammonia readings, nitrite readings, nitrate readings?
    what are you testing with?
    how did you cycle? whats your filtration?
    ph i not important with your fish, as long as it is stable.
    do you add ph chemicals? if so stop
    i hear some people say, "i kept a goldfish in a bowl and it lived for a year."
    they don't know how lucky they were and all goldfish live at least 15 years in proper conditions.
    that is equal to saying my human lived in his closet for 5 years!

  7. #7

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Flyby Stardancer View Post
    I've noticed in my short time here that stocking issues come up a lot. :) And while I can't just look at a list of someone's stock to identify problems, AquaAdvisor seems to be a good guide to picking out the worst problems.
    Well done!

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by jgranata13 View Post
    Ok, I have some questions to help figure out what's going on:
    1. When did you get the tank?
    2. Did you cycle?
    3. Did you add all the fish at once, or did you add them slowly over time?
    4. Did you use anything other than water to clean the tank?
    5. Just out of curiosity, why did you add ack a scoop of the old gravel?
    6. You said that once you cleaned the tank, you ciphoned half the water back into the tank, topped it up with tap water, and added "not much at all" conditioner. Was it at least enough to treat the amount of water that you added?
    7. Did you let any of the filter media dry out while you were cleaning the tank?
    8. Did your fish look sickly at all before this?

    Now, I'll just add a few things that I thought of while reading your post. First, the size of a water change doesn't really matter as long as the water quality doesn't dramatically improve. You can even do a 75% water change and, as long as the water wasn't super-dirty before the change, you would be fine. This is because beneficial bacteria don't live in the water itself, so taking out the water does nothing. Also, more important than correct paramaters (to an extent) is consistency. So if your water is really dirty, and if it suddenly becomes super clean after a large water change, it'll shock your fish.

    That sort of leads into my next point. I'm not 100% sure about this, but I think tetras and danios come from soft, slightly acidic water. Now, since most fish are never raised in their own environments, it's probably ok for them to be in harder water as long as it's consistent. However, if you say your water is extremely hard, then I'd be inclined to say that that's probably what did them in.
    1. I have had the tank for some time now, maybe a year or two.

    2. By cycle do you mean let the tank run for a few days? if so than yes i did that when i first got it.

    3.I added them slowly over time.

    4. Just water, but i did use some almost steel wool type stuff that i found for this one part that had loads of algae on it. (underneath the gravel in the back of the tank)

    5. I thought that i would be able to preserve some of the beneficial bacteria by doing so.

    6. i used 2/3s of what it said to thinking that i didn't need all of it.

    7. Do you mean let the filter get dry? if so than no, in the filter where the water is, i just let it sit like that with the water still in it.

    8. Before this point, they where doing just fine. Nothing looked wrong with any of them other than their environment (the tank had gotten kinda nasty).

    But i have another question. If i where to get rid of the yoyo loach, how would i go about getting rid of these randome snails that keep popping up? I was told by an ignorant store worker that the loach would only grow up to 3 inches. Wow he was wrong. its already about 4.

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by vafa View Post
    if you see gunk on your gravel you don't have to change your gravel.
    use a gravel vacuum and get it out.
    what are you ammonia readings, nitrite readings, nitrate readings?
    what are you testing with?
    how did you cycle? whats your filtration?
    ph i not important with your fish, as long as it is stable.
    do you add ph chemicals? if so stop
    I knew that it didn't need to be changed, i was just sick of the way it looked. I use the vacuums thing about once a month. Nitrite, and Nitrate levels where perfect. Im not sure about ammonia, but i have an ammonia detoxifier chemical. should i use it just to be safe? I did use a hair of ph raising chemical today just to try to bump it up, but afterwards i read that its bad, and doesn't work, so im not going to be using it ever again. Idk the name of the filtration unit, but its the one where there is a foam insert at the bottom, then the carbon, then these pellet things in a little net that are supposed to hold some bacteria when the other stages are changed. Thanks for all the help guys! i really appreciate it!

  10. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Hmmm... I'm stumped. It doesn't sound like you did anything that destroyed a lot of beneficial bacteria, so I don't really know what happened. I was thinking that may have been a possibility, since clouding after a water change is usually indicative of a bacterial bloom. What water conditioner do you use. Also, I would suggest always putting at least the recommended amount to treat the water just to be safe.

    Another question: what substrate did you purchase?

    Finally, I don't know about the loach and/or snails because I've never had either.
    Joseph Granata
    My decommissioned 37gal freshwater community tank journal: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...d.php?t=116054
    My current 37gal FOWLR tank journal: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...42#post1214342

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