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Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15
  1. #11

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    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by KevinVA View Post
    The one thing that really scares me about sumps, is the back flow if the power is cut, which could then overflow your sump and flood your floor. I've seen that some people use a check valve to prevent this. Do you think that's adequate and would really work?
    All you have to do is add a pin hole or two to a spot on your return line (in side the tank) to prevent a siphon and leave enough room in your sump for the water to drain back into from your drain line when you loose power. I've had many power failures and not a drop of water on the floor yet

    Quote Originally Posted by KevinVA View Post
    Another things I've seen in sumps, is that people drill a couple of holes in their main tank for overflow, rather than just one, and have both outlets drain into the sump. Is that mainly for clogging issues? Do they usually keep both draining or close one and open the other and switch it out if there's a clog present?
    In a lot of set-ups, they are put close together mostly for looks, less stuff in the tank to look at that way and it is a little easier to make as well I think. You might be thinking of a more typical marine set-up where the return and drain lines are both inside the same overflow to hide the plumbing

    Quote Originally Posted by KevinVA View Post
    I can't even imagine what might clog these holes... they're large enough for some fish to fit... of course, that could be what does it. haha

    Do you guys recommend overflows or just draining from the holes, exclusively? I imagine the holes could be fixed with filter mesh or something to prevent bigger objects from getting sucked in, but maybe the overflows serve a purpose I'm not seeing/understanding.
    I would also recommend overflows. They will not only hide the plumbing, but also help you to limit the drain back that will get into the sump should you have a power failure. The below links should help explain this in a lot more detail.

    http://www.reefaquarium.com/2012/some-sump-basics/

    http://www.reefaquarium.com/2012/aqu...umbing-basics/
    Last edited by Cliff; 05-28-2013 at 05:24 PM.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  2. #12

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Well few reasons I could see it would be good having more than 1 hole drilled in the tank.

    If you have one and it clogs, the tank will flood, so having 2 or 3 will prevent that, and by having more than one you can pull water from more parts of the tank.

    I don't think you would need to rid up the floor, just put the sump on 4" concrete blocks, even then that is probably over kill.
    The Dirty 75
    11 Parva Rainbow, 2 Platies, 14 Sterbai, 4 Calico BN Pleco
    My Triple 10 Stack
    My First AC Thread

  3. #13

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Hardy85 View Post
    Well few reasons I could see it would be good having more than 1 hole drilled in the tank.

    If you have one and it clogs, the tank will flood, so having 2 or 3 will prevent that, and by having more than one you can pull water from more parts of the tank.

    I don't think you would need to rid up the floor, just put the sump on 4" concrete blocks, even then that is probably over kill.
    I was thinking a drain from the left and center, but if it's not necessary, I'll deal with only the one drain. Hopefully the circulation created from the pump would be enough to push the more toxic water into the drain. Though, I am thinking of a spray bar, rather than outlet tube. Figured the Discus/Angels would appreciate a spray bar more, plus the breaking of the surface tension will be more beneficial.

    As for the floor... I'm thinking more of looks, with running a pipe from the sump to the basement sump/drain. It's going to be a finished basement, so having random pipes running along the floor or wall will look pretty tacky. My wife wouldn't have it. It's probably easy enough to do and fix the concrete, but I'd really need to make everything sit flush again. Unless you're talking about a temporary fixture?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cliff
    All you have to do is add a pin hole or two to a spot on your return line (in side the tank) to prevent a siphon and leave enough room in your sump for the water to drain back into from your drain line when you loose power. I've had many power failures and not a drop of water on the floor yet
    Sounds good to me. The simpler the better. =]

    Quote Originally Posted by Cliff
    I would also recommend overflows. They will not only hide the plumbing, but also help you to limit the drain back that will get into the sump should you have a power failure. The below links should help explain this in a lot more detail.

    http://www.reefaquarium.com/2012/some-sump-basics/

    http://www.reefaquarium.com/2012/aqu...umbing-basics/
    Overflows it is. Thank you so much for the links, I appreciate it. I was hoping there was a how-to guide available for this type of project (and an explanation for the materials needed) - I'm much better with visuals and honestly, I wouldn't know what to look for. I'll definitely need to bookmark those - a ton of great information.
    Adventures in Aquaria - The KevinVA Story

    When in doubt, ask yourself... W.W.L.S (What would Lee Say)?

  4. #14

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Let me know if there are other things you are not to sure of (if any) and maybe I can help by taking a few detailed pictures of how I have done things.

    It sounds like I'm very similar to you in that I need to see it to better understand it. Even tho I work for a plumbing whole sale company, I needed to see a few sumped set-ups before I could plan mine better.
    If you take your time to do the research FIRST, you can successfully set-up and keep ANY type of aquarium with ease.
    "Not using a quarantine tank is like playing Russian roulette. Nobody wins the game, some people just get to play longer than others." - Anthony Calfo
    Fishless Cycle Cycling with Fish Marine Aquarium Info [URL="http://saltwater.aquaticcommunity.com/"]

  5. #15

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Thanks Cliff! No wonder you're the go-to. This is your trade. =] I feel even better about my chances now. lol

    And yes, that's exactly how I am. Someone telling me how something works pales in comparison to actually seeing it in action.
    Adventures in Aquaria - The KevinVA Story

    When in doubt, ask yourself... W.W.L.S (What would Lee Say)?

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