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Results 11 to 20 of 30
  1. #11

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by fishery View Post
    I have seen 3 feet Arowanas that have been housed in a 6 feet tank, so my 4 Feet tank for a 12 inch fish I don't believe can be called small.
    I've seen common plecos in a 2 feet, doesn't make it right. I recently saw a resecued arowana that was about 2 feet. Kept too small for too long and had a spinal problem. Shop had it in a small indoor pond while figuring out what to do with it. The poor fish was swimming in small circles in 1/3 of the pond because it was not used to space.

    Maybe tanks are cheap in your part of the world, I saw a post week back where someone got a 8 foot tank for 150$, I got my 4 feet tank for 455 USD and that is the rate in India.

    Keep to the topic please, there is no such thing as a large tank, unless and until you have money to buy a small lake.
    You're looking for health advice. You're getting it. Just because it's not what you want to hear doesn't make it invalid. If you are looking to keep a huge fish then, just like with any other fish, you should be prepared to provide adequate housing for it's entire natural live. Another word for Arowana is tankbuster. Lots of arowana keepers can be found on monsterfishkeepers.com. Doesn't that tell you something?

    As to diet, I think anyone looking to keep predators should read about thiaminase
    . http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.u...t.php?sid=5232

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by talldutchie View Post
    you should be prepared to provide adequate housing for it's entire natural live. Another word for Arowana is
    There is no such thing as adequate housing for a 4 feet fish.
    Arowana's are mostly kept alone, they have no reproductive behavior, they can eat only what you give, and they have restricted space no matter what the tank size.

    Keeping an aquarium is for human enjoyment only, no fish will want to be captured and spend the rest of its life in a tank, irrespective of tank size.
    I am sure every fish lover would agree as that is the truth.

    Just because you keep a convict in prison where he has all the comforts of life wont make him happy, it is freedom that gives happiness, wouldn't you agree?

  3. #13

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Fishery, by that logic you are saying that keeping a 3 foot fish in a 4 foot tank is the same as keeping it in an 8 foot tank.
    <-- Click for journals
    "There is no right way to do the wrong thing." - KingFisher "Only bad things happen fast in this hobby" - Cliff

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Aeonflame View Post
    Fishery, by that logic you are saying that keeping a 3 foot fish in a 4 foot tank is the same as keeping it in an 8 foot tank.
    Nope I will be selling him off once he gets bigger by say another 10 cm, but I can't guarantee that the person I sell to will make adequate housing for him.
    Because there is no such thing as adequate housing, 8 foot or 80 foot it is still limited space isn't it.

  5. #15

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Yes, but can't you see that 80 feet is a lot better than 8 feet?
    <-- Click for journals
    "There is no right way to do the wrong thing." - KingFisher "Only bad things happen fast in this hobby" - Cliff

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Certainly but who really bothers to buy a 80 feet tank, mostly people max out at 8 or 12.

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Yeah, I have a knife fish in a 250 gallon tank, 8ft tank with several other fish. He is growing slowly, around 14" right now but eventually he will even out grow this tank and I will have to give him away. It would be ok if I didn't have other fish too but I do and I like my Oscars better. I would say that you have a few years before he will out grow your tank. Just replace him with Oscars, they are better looking fish!
    Astrofish man I am
    250 gallon super tank 97" long. 4 x Oscars + pleco and cichlids.

  8. #18

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Most people don't keep arowana because they get just too big! There's tons of things you can do with a 63 gallon from a heavily planted tank with small fish to some of the bigger cichlid species.

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    this thread irks me, but i can see about 2% reasoning, back before my fish days i just had a 10 gallon with 4 platies and I thoght they did fine, though in my 125 the use all 5 ft, either way always get your tank before your get your fish, most people dont do the 'I will give it away or get a bigger tank" crap happens and they forget


  10. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I second the notion of building a plywood tank. Someone said will cost $500 for a 500g tank. That works out to be $1 per gallon. You could save even more money buy disassembling the 63g and using the glass as viewing panels for the plywood tank. If you put the back, front and bottom glass panels end to end in a line next to each other you could have a really large viewing window which could give you a long tank. This would provide adequate swimmi g space for the arowana, if it is wide enough for it to turn around.

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