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Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Mineral Buildup

  1. Default Mineral Buildup


    0 Not allowed!
    Apparently I have very hard water, and have a lot of mineral buildup. I only noticed today that it has slightly corroded the stand. OH BOY!

    I'm scrubbing as hard as I possibly can on the tank itself, but there's a layer that won't come off with just muscle and a vinegar-soaked cloth. Is there another safe way to get that dang scale off of the aquarium? (My fish are currently in my reserve tank.)
    Last edited by aquahead1; 03-18-2013 at 11:36 PM. Reason: Messed up
    10 Gallon: 5 Peppered Corys | Pool Filter Sand | x2 AquaTech 5-15 Power Filter | 2 plastic plants

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    if you have time, soak a cloth with vinegar and put it over the affected area. let it do its magic for a few hours and previously stubborn scale should come off easier.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I've always found the simplest way is to use a razor blade. I purchased my 90g tank as a used saltwater tank that sat dry for a while, so you can imagine the inside was pretty bad. I filled a small bowl with vinegar, got out my trusty razor blade, wiped down the inside with vinegar in sections and scraped all the build-up off. Didn't take much effort nor time. Oh, but this is for glass tanks, I've never owned an acrylic tank so I don't know if this applies. Just thought I'd throw that out there since I don't know what kind of tank you have.

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I've scraped and used cheap dollar store green cleaning pads (not as abrasive as the real thing). But!!!! I used the pad once on an acrylic tank thinking it was glass (or not actually thinking there was other than glass, 20 years ago) and BIG MISTAKE! If you have acrylic or are not sure be very careful. I was not happy with the scratching. I eventually just left it for my ex GF it was so bad.


    Shrimp and snail junkie... What can I say, I like the little things in life.


  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    It's a 10g glass tank with the buildup. So later on, should I purchase an acrylic tank, or glass tank. (I'm planning on buying a 75g to a 100g. Somewhere in those lines.)
    10 Gallon: 5 Peppered Corys | Pool Filter Sand | x2 AquaTech 5-15 Power Filter | 2 plastic plants

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I prefer glass tanks because acrylic scratches really easily. I believe acrylic is lighter and stronger though.

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