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Results 31 to 40 of 60
  1. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by andreahp View Post
    Please see my responses above
    The only possible way that my nitrites would go down faster than the ammonia eaters are producing it is if I have significantly more nitrite eaters than ammonia eaters...and they will just die off for lack of nitrite in the future...

    Wouldn't it be more beneficial to watch the Nitrate? I can't even watch the Nitrate anymore because it is > than my test kit can measure. That means the nitrite eaters are prevalent (otherwise I wouldn't be off the chart in Nitrate)...

    I think going farther than I currently am would just build up more nitrite eaters than my tank will eventually support, and they will all die off.

    Am I wrong with this logic?

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by andreahp View Post
    Please see my responses above
    So when you saw a "spike" in nitrite when you were cycling, it was > than you test kit could read?

    Just trying to be clear that my nitrite and nitrate are both off the charts...

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    The poop comment was a joke. I mean are there any other fish I should consider as "bottom feeders" or "aquarium cleaners"

    Thanks

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Just got home and checked the levels of everything - pretty much the same:

    0 ppm ammonia (after doing 1-2 ppm 24 hours ago) - it has been like this for 3-4 days (going from 1-2 to zero in 24 hours)
    >>> 6 ppm nitrite - this has been off the charts for 3-4 days now
    > 100 ppm nitrate - this has been climbing for 3-4 days - it started at 0 ppm 4 days ago and is now > 100 ppm

    so obviously there is a ton of bacteria converting the nitrite into nitrate, otherwise I wouldn't have skyrocketed to > 100 ppm in 3-4 days.

    You are saying that I need to wait until I have a colony SO BIG that it can not only remove the >>> 6 ppm that is already in there, but also remove the nitrite that results in the conversion of the 1-2 ppm of ammonia everyday?

    That means I would a bunch more nitrite eating bacteria than ammonia - seems odd to me.

  5. #35

    Join Date
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    Awards Showcase

    For working with new fish keepers! Outstanding this month. - Taurus Just Because - Surfdog A round for the fallen this Memorial Day weekend. - Compass I had no cup, so I put it on a bun... - Slaphppy7 You are amazing! So smart and giving. - SeaLady 
    Can't give you any more rep, but well said! - steeler58 Thank again!! You seem to enjoy your coffee. - steeler58 Thanks for the rep!! - Compass this doesnt look like pie... not the right kind.. - Sandz for providing solid guidance to others - RiversGirl 
    Thanks for the rep! :) - Compass cheers - Fishhook Using up my winnings on my friends! - Compass No Message - Fishhook beeeeeeeer! - Sandz 
    Bottoms up! (even though you don't drink, lol) - Slaphppy7 We miss you... - Compass thank you for the filter! - RiversGirl for the fun game! - SeaLady Thank you very very much!! - Compass 

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I'm glad the poop comment was a joke.

    For some reason this is where most people slip up or lose patience. I am saying you need to wait until the tank reads 0ppm for both ammonia and nitrite and don't need to worry about nitrate until there are fish in the tank. Nitrite of 6ppm is very toxic and will kill any fish you put in the tank. The nitrites will go down, you must be patient.
    You do have significantly more nitrite eaters, 100+ppm nitrate is proof of that. 100ppm is much more than 6pmm (nitrites). You are right, obviously there is a ton of bacteria converting nitrite to nitrate.. have patience and let it do its job. You will start to see the nitrite go down and once that starts it doesn't take long to reach 0ppm.
    When I go fishing I just place a sharp rock in the water and sit there waiting for all the dead fish to float to the top... Kingfisher
    Brutal honesty will be shown on this screen.
    I think my fish is adjusting well to the four gallon, He's laying on his side attempting to go to sleep on the bottom of the gravel.
    Tolerance is a great thing to have, so is the ability to shut up.

    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.


  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by mommy1 View Post
    I'm glad the poop comment was a joke.

    For some reason this is where most people slip up or lose patience. I am saying you need to wait until the tank reads 0ppm for both ammonia and nitrite and don't need to worry about nitrate until there are fish in the tank. Nitrite of 6ppm is very toxic and will kill any fish you put in the tank. The nitrites will go down, you must be patient.
    You do have significantly more nitrite eaters, 100+ppm nitrate is proof of that. 100ppm is much more than 6pmm (nitrites). You are right, obviously there is a ton of bacteria converting nitrite to nitrate.. have patience and let it do its job. You will start to see the nitrite go down and once that starts it doesn't take long to reach 0ppm.
    I believe you are thinking I plan to throw fish in with it at > 6 ppm Nitrite. I am saying that because I have so many bacteria already converting Nitrite to Nitrate (as evidenced by my > 100 ppm of Nitrate in 3-4 days), that I have sufficient bacteria for a "cycled" tank. I can, therefore, change the water out to lower my nitrite / nitrate down to a more reasonable level. I would then wait until the remaining nitrite is all gone, add one more dose of ammonia to ensure that both the ammonia and nitrite go down to 0 ppm in 24 hours, and then I can add my fish.

    Does that make sense? I think it makes more sense then sitting here an waiting for my nitrite eating bacteria to grow into such numbers that they can eat > 6 ppm of nitrite AND all the nitrite that is being produced by the consumption of 1-2 ppm of ammonia every 24 hours. My tank will NEVER see that kind of nitrite production for fish (nor would ANY fish tank) and, therefore, why would I need that many bacteria?

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Seabiscuit. You've been given sound advice that's proven to work. From the beginning, you've not followed the cycling thread to the letter and have consequently slowed down your cycle. a fishless cycle generally will take from 3 to 4 weeks, sometimes a little more time. I believe that on 3-5 you said you'd been at this 15 days. as of now, that makes 24 days. Considering your over dose of ammonia in the beginning and the fact that you redosed ammonia before it had dropped to zero and did not half your dose and that you now have nitrites off the chart, I'd say you're moving at a pretty good clip.

    Clearly, you're impatient. And clearly it's your tank. Take the advise or leave it. It's starting to feel a little pointless for us to continually argue the point.
    Good luck and I hope all works out for you.
    30 g FW planted:corys, ABNP, blue angel, harleys, zebra danios, nerites & mystery snails
    15 g FW planted: crown tail betta, neons, snails
    90 g FW semi planted: Blood Parrots, severum, Jurupari, EBJD, congos, kribs, clown pleco, snails
    90 Gal Journal: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ad.php?t=93939
    Fishless cycling: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ead.php?t=5640
    Cycling with fish: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aqua...ad.php?t=36492

  8. #38

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    A little further from sanity
    Posts
    8,203

    Awards Showcase

    For working with new fish keepers! Outstanding this month. - Taurus Just Because - Surfdog A round for the fallen this Memorial Day weekend. - Compass I had no cup, so I put it on a bun... - Slaphppy7 You are amazing! So smart and giving. - SeaLady 
    Can't give you any more rep, but well said! - steeler58 Thank again!! You seem to enjoy your coffee. - steeler58 Thanks for the rep!! - Compass this doesnt look like pie... not the right kind.. - Sandz for providing solid guidance to others - RiversGirl 
    Thanks for the rep! :) - Compass cheers - Fishhook Using up my winnings on my friends! - Compass No Message - Fishhook beeeeeeeer! - Sandz 
    Bottoms up! (even though you don't drink, lol) - Slaphppy7 We miss you... - Compass thank you for the filter! - RiversGirl for the fun game! - SeaLady Thank you very very much!! - Compass 

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    It's not that you need that many bacteria, it is that you need a good, strong cycle, and you can't rush that. A water change will bring down the current levels of nitrite and nitrate, but will do little to nothing to the bacteria since little to none live in the water column. You will see them skyrocket again after you re-dose.
    Trust me, the cycle will complete, once the nitrite level starts to decline it will do so fairly quick, but it does take time to start to drop.

    Patience is your and your fish's best ally in this hobby (right up there under experience and research), and if you don't have enough to get through a cycle then maybe you should take up a different hobby. I am not being mean to you, but think about this seriously, if you can't wait 4 weeks for your tank to cycle, how will you wait for QT time, how will you wait for your tank to mature, how will you wait to research new purchases? This hobby is not faced paced, it's not bungy jumping where the thrill is over in a few seconds. This is a slow paced hobby and the thrill lasts for years, as you watch the Eco-system you created grow, mature, and thrive, but it must be built on the strong foundation that is cycling your tank.
    When I go fishing I just place a sharp rock in the water and sit there waiting for all the dead fish to float to the top... Kingfisher
    Brutal honesty will be shown on this screen.
    I think my fish is adjusting well to the four gallon, He's laying on his side attempting to go to sleep on the bottom of the gravel.
    Tolerance is a great thing to have, so is the ability to shut up.

    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.


  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by fishmommie View Post
    Seabiscuit. You've been given sound advice that's proven to work. From the beginning, you've not followed the cycling thread to the letter and have consequently slowed down your cycle. a fishless cycle generally will take from 3 to 4 weeks, sometimes a little more time. I believe that on 3-5 you said you'd been at this 15 days. as of now, that makes 24 days. Considering your over dose of ammonia in the beginning and the fact that you redosed ammonia before it had dropped to zero and did not half your dose and that you now have nitrites off the chart, I'd say you're moving at a pretty good clip.

    Clearly, you're impatient. And clearly it's your tank. Take the advise or leave it. It's starting to feel a little pointless for us to continually argue the point.
    Good luck and I hope all works out for you.
    Your arrogance is appalling. Weren't you the one who started this thread by condemning me for my harsh language? And now you come on here with your holier than thou attitude?

    First - this isn't the only site on the internet that discusses cycling. In fact, I didn't even discover this site until the date of my first post. To insinuate that I didn't follow your precious sticky guide to the letter shows you as an arrogant hypocrite that believes that this is the only site that gives advice on cycling.

    Look around on the internet, every place besides here has suggested 3-5 ppm of ammonia for cycling. That is what I used. Contrary to your ignorant statement, I did not "redose ammonia before it had dropped to zero" and "did not half my dose of ammonia" - My ammonia dropped from 3 - 5 ppm to zero in about 3 days. I have since been dosing at 1-2 ppm per day as it goes to zero every day. Reading comprehension is tough, I know, but at least try and read.

    Now you even refuse to read my previous posts. I have given a sound, logical, reasonable argument for a path to take, and you are telling me I am not listening to you. You believe so fully in your "sticky guide" that you cannot think for yourself and answer a question when the situation deviates from your "sticky guide."

    Others here are actually giving advice - you come on to berate.

  10. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by mommy1 View Post
    It's not that you need that many bacteria, it is that you need a good, strong cycle, and you can't rush that. A water change will bring down the current levels of nitrite and nitrate, but will do little to nothing to the bacteria since little to none live in the water column. You will see them skyrocket again after you re-dose.
    Trust me, the cycle will complete, once the nitrite level starts to decline it will do so fairly quick, but it does take time to start to drop.

    Patience is your and your fish's best ally in this hobby (right up there under experience and research), and if you don't have enough to get through a cycle then maybe you should take up a different hobby. I am not being mean to you, but think about this seriously, if you can't wait 4 weeks for your tank to cycle, how will you wait for QT time, how will you wait for your tank to mature, how will you wait to research new purchases? This hobby is not faced paced, it's not bungy jumping where the thrill is over in a few seconds. This is a slow paced hobby and the thrill lasts for years, as you watch the Eco-system you created grow, mature, and thrive, but it must be built on the strong foundation that is cycling your tank.
    Again, I don't understand the arrogance on this forum. The very fact that I am here, asking for help and attempting to cycle my tank already puts me in the minority, as most people would buy a tank, throw fish in and watch as they die -

    It seems like you all don't understand what a "cycle" is...you just kinda follow a pre-determined path and can't think for yourselves.

    A cycle is this:
    1) create an ammonia rich environment that will mimic the conditions of a fully stocked tank
    2) Allow bacteria that eat the ammonia to grow in numbers sufficient to remove the quantities of ammonia representative of a fully stocked tank
    3) This in turn creates a nitrite rich environment that will mimic the conditions of a fully stocked tank
    4) This allows bacteria that eat nitrite to grow in numbers sufficient to remove the quantities of nitrite representative of a fully stocked tank
    5) once you have sufficient bacteria of both types, your cycle is complete

    What you are saying is that I won't have "sufficient bacteria to remove quantities of nitrite representative of a fully stocked tank" until I have enough bacteria to eat > 6ppm of nitrite + a daily dose of nitrite equal to the waste product of 1-2 ppm of ammonia being converted.

    If you can tell me that a normal tank needs enough bacteria to convert that much nitrite during normal use, then I will continue the cycle. If not, then I will change the water until a "normal" amount of nitrite (representative of what a fully stocked tank might experience) is present, and continue my cycle until that amount of nitrite is gone in 24 hours.

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