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Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. Default MTS, good or bad?


    0 Not allowed!
    I am setting up my new 200 gallon tank with african cichlids. I will do some live plants. I am using black sand for substrate. I have read a lot of differing opinions on Malaysian Trumpet Snails. I considered putting some in my tank to help keep it clean and sift through the sand. Is that a terrible idea?

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    they will aerate your sand and keep it clean, however, in a heavily stocked african cichlid tank(as all african cichlid tanks have to be to minimize aggression)
    they probably will also multiply to a level where they could be considered a pest.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Sometimes i feel like the only snail lover on AC. Saying that I will always suggest adding them. They clean, natures maids. If you think they are getting too much for your liking you can always get Assasin snails to control the pop. IMO if you have too many snails there is too much food in the tank (or leftovers).

    I purposely bought some plants from my LFS so I could add them to my habitat. I think they look cool, but that's one person's opinion.


    Shrimp and snail junkie... What can I say, I like the little things in life.


  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    This will help. Read this AC article:

    http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aquarium/snails.php


    Shrimp and snail junkie... What can I say, I like the little things in life.


  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    As a matter of fact I also tolerate ramshorns in my tank, because they keep me conservative with feeding and quick in the decision to do a water change, plus they can be squished and fed to fish as an on site source of live food that won't run out. However I am not so sure wi mts because if their supposed fantastical ability to reproduce and also because their thick shells and operculum deter predators.

  6. #6

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I love my mts. Good for sand but they do need population control.

  7. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    They share my Otos' cucumbers sometimes, otherwise I never see the buggers.

    I have small children that would love to see babies, any babies, (and I don't want guppies) so i figured the MTS would be good.

    Six months, no babies.
    Looks about 40 Gallon Tank
    Betta, Buenos Aires Tetra, Neon Tetra, Harlequin Rasbora, and Otocinclus
    Wisteria, Amazon Sword, Java Fern, and my unstoppable Trumpet Snail Army

    Looks about 75 Gallon Tank
    Wet and Empty; thinking Scalare, Corydoras, Otocinclus

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I like having snails in my planted tank because it gives it a more natural feel; it's also one step closer to a natural ecosystem. I've never felt that my MTS or Ramshorn snail populations have gotten out of control, but I also don't overfeed.

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I have to admit I like my MTS as well. Quite a bit. When I only had my 20 gallon, they were a pest problem, but that was because I wayyyy overfed and didn't do the maintenance I should have.

    A few made it over to the 55gallon, and they are playing much more nicely this time. I like that they are actually getting some good size on them, and they aren't reproducing enough to be problem (yet). They really do a good job of mixing up the substrate, and they really are pretty if you look at them closely.

    That said, I'm not sure I'd pay for them. Either they'll show up when you buy plants or maybe a friend can give some to you. See maybe if petsmart(if you are near one) can give you a few...it looks like thier tanks are always loaded with them. All you need is a few, really, to get going.
    Beth
    1 - 55 gallon planted community
    3 - 10 to 20 gallon planted betta tanks
    My advice: slow down, think, and be willing to learn. Then you'll be fine, no matter what.

  10. #10

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Here's my take:

    Pros:
    - MTS will dig and aerate your substrate, as already mentioned, which is particularly important with sand.
    - Will eat uneated fish food, algae, dead fish (losses happen... and sometimes can go unnoticed).
    - Tend to come out at nighttime, so you tank doesn't look overrun even when it is

    Cons:
    - MTS, while they will eat some algae, are mostly carnivorous. That means that they will actively eat any fish eggs, or eggs of other snails.
    - MTS give birth to live baby snails, and will breed even faster than most "pest" snails
    - Once you have them in a tank, it's pretty much impossible to get rid of them. They will survive bleach, salt, almost boiling water, being dried out for a week. They are like the terminator of pest snails.

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