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Results 11 to 20 of 27

Thread: Cloudy Water

  1. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    You want to reduce the heterotrophic bacteria population. They don't process ammonia as effectively as autotrophic bacteria. They do not consume nitrites. They also compete with autotrophic bacteria for space and oxygen.

  2. #12

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    Exclamation


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by sweeneyc
    well I dosed with the pure ammonia source I had in the beginning when I was cycling, but I did not do it as regularly as I should have been. I probably dosed the amount needed every two days.
    Which also means that your bacteria coloney may be too small to support the fish and their waste is causing bacteria to grow in the water. Check the ammonia level and then do large a 80% water change to get the water clearer.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    80% seems like a little too much to me, I would probably do 40% and then a day or two later another 40%. I have not dosed with that ammonia for 5 days now. I didn't dose two days before buying the pleco.
    Last edited by sweeneyc; 01-03-2013 at 05:05 PM.

  4. #14

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Why does 80% seem like too much? Fish love water changes and new water won't affect anything negatively.

    It's possible you had some BB die off prior to adding the pleco and now you have a bacterial bloom. Generally, if someone can't add fish right after their tank is finished cycling, it's advised to add ammonia once a day to keep the bacteria fed.

    I'm not saying you are at ground zero with bacteria, but if there was die off your filter could be catching up with the ammonia produced by the pleco.
    46 gal fw tank with black skirt tetras, neon tetras, spotted corys, cherry barbs, otoclinus, snails & 4 amano shrimp - plastic & live plants
    5 gal QT
    Remember: Our job is to take care of the water our fish live in

  5. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    okay. Yeah I wasn't very methodical with the dosing of ammonia but I knew I was supposed to be but oh well.

    It just seems pretty rough to me to change out 80% of their habitat, even if it is fresh. I mean even if the pH is off in the new water by .1 or .2, that could really have an impact if you replace 80% of your tank with it.

  6. #16

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Why would new water have such a different pH? Once your fish are used to what comes out of your tap, doing a large change should have no negative affect.

    There is nothing rough about changing out that much water at a time. As a matter of fact, if someone's ammonia level or other water parameter is excessively high, we recommend at least 75% of a change (more than once a day if needed) to bring the reading down. In the wild, fish constantly receive fresh water - new water brings in nutrients & removes toxins.
    46 gal fw tank with black skirt tetras, neon tetras, spotted corys, cherry barbs, otoclinus, snails & 4 amano shrimp - plastic & live plants
    5 gal QT
    Remember: Our job is to take care of the water our fish live in

  7. #17

    Join Date
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    Happy Christmas - MuckyFish thanks for advising on vegetables for my kribs! so here is a discus - ScottishFish You help a lot - PhillipOrigami For the bank account, and thx for the rep - Cliff beautiful discus! - Crispy 
    I know this doesn't help but it's all I can do! - chrisfraser05 for all the wise advice you've given me - fishmommie Congrats on 2000th post! - andreahp Merry Christmas! - fishmommie Merry Christmas - Cliff 
    Thanks for the rep :-) - ~firefly~ appreciate it. - fishmommie Thanks for the birthday wishes - mommy1 ٩(̾●̮̮̃̾̃̾)۶ - korith For all the good advice you give. - ~firefly~ 
    Thanks for the rep the other day - Cliff thanks for the rep points.  appreciate it - fishmommie happy friday! - mojosodope Merry Christmas! - ~firefly~ Thanks for the rep! - steeler1 

    Exclamation


    0 Not allowed!
    New water's pH shouldn't significantly differ if 1)The tank has had water changes fairly often and/or 2) the water isn't very soft.

    If your water is too soft or you haven't changed the water for well over a week, then you should consider three water changes spread over two days of 30% will yield a water change of almost 65% Ignoring rounding:

    That is: first W/C yield's 70% (0.7) original water remaining; next W/C is 30% (or 0.3) of the remaining 0.70 and this amount (removed) is subtracted from the 0.7, yielding 0.21 removed or about 0.5 remaining. A third W/C of 0.3 (30%) would be the remaining 50% (of the original) or 0.3 * 0.5 = 0.15 and this amount now removed is subtracted from 0.5 yielding 0.35 of the original water remaining; ridiculously simple.

    In this manner, even if the pH falls, it will be small (and get smaller each time) spread over two days.

    This math is very simple and I'm lost why people keep missing this simple fact. Once more I feel that a sticky thread on this topic is critical (I'm tried of rewriting threads on this) and posted because the MOST import thing we do is water changes but time after time, people are totally confused on this subject!

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    okay, sounds pretty logical now that you mention the wild habitat option. Thanks for convincing me!

    I will water change and gravel vaccuum today.

  9. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    @ cermet

    I feel that on this particular forum that many people throw these numbers at me (as you just did) and expect us to understand that. Most of us are first time Aquarist and do not particularly need that kind of knowledge thrown at them. I agree with you on the fact that water changes are a, if not the most, important aspect of aquarium maintenance.

    Now from my point of view, I am just being cautious. When all my life (in reef aquariums) we have done things slowly over time, in small increments, with precision, and we do things like smaller partial water changes weekly instead of monthly because in my 75 gallon mixed reef there is a lot more to be concerned about that simply pH. I am new to fresh water, I must admit. And I find that it is increasingly different than salt or reef tanks. So truly, be patient with us new aquarists, we are learning, albeit slowly, but still learning. Thank you very much for adjusting my knowledge on this, I am very appreciative.

  10. #20

    Join Date
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    Happy Christmas - MuckyFish thanks for advising on vegetables for my kribs! so here is a discus - ScottishFish You help a lot - PhillipOrigami For the bank account, and thx for the rep - Cliff beautiful discus! - Crispy 
    I know this doesn't help but it's all I can do! - chrisfraser05 for all the wise advice you've given me - fishmommie Congrats on 2000th post! - andreahp Merry Christmas! - fishmommie Merry Christmas - Cliff 
    Thanks for the rep :-) - ~firefly~ appreciate it. - fishmommie Thanks for the birthday wishes - mommy1 ٩(̾●̮̮̃̾̃̾)۶ - korith For all the good advice you give. - ~firefly~ 
    Thanks for the rep the other day - Cliff thanks for the rep points.  appreciate it - fishmommie happy friday! - mojosodope Merry Christmas! - ~firefly~ Thanks for the rep! - steeler1 

    Smile


    0 Not allowed!
    Your point is very good relative to saltwater (salt level is a really critical parameter that must not drift) but fresh water does not have this added problem (pH is, as you correctly pointed out, could be a major concern.)

    Multiple water changes are easier, more stable but really poor in exchanging water - if you have a bad problem, a small water change or two small changes will often do little to correct the problem.

    My issue was not with beginners but that so few people here think about this issue and I feel we do need a 'sticky' on the subject. I suggested this once before (no one cared) and so, will try again.

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