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Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Default Breeding Angel Fish


    0 Not allowed!
    I'm about to set up a 55 gallon tank to breed angelfish. I intend to buy 6-8 young fish and hope that they pair off and will lay eggs on some flat "movable" objects. My plan is to remove the objects with the eggs into a smaller 5-10 gallon tank and grow the babies in there. My plan is:

    1. I was thinking about using an under gravel filter with powerheads to move and filter an adequate amount of water as well keep a sponge filter going. I intend to move the sponge filter into the 10 gallon tank with the eggs as well as some of the water from the 55 gallon tank.

    2. I use R/O water in most of my other tanks. Am I better off using regular Los Angeles tap water (made safe for fish)?

    3. I have a few planted tanks and am considering planting this tank as well. Will I have better results if the fish have plenty of plants to hide in and separate themselves when they pair off? Will the intense lighting needed for the plants hinder pairing off or egg laying.

    4. I've read different articles about the best temperature for angelfish. I currently have them in one tank at 82F and another at 79F. They seem to do just fine in either environment.

    I would appreciate any ideas, suggestions or strategies that others have used successfully.

    Thanks in advance ...... Mike

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by mikekomm
    I'm about to set up a 55 gallon tank to breed angelfish. I intend to buy 6-8 young fish and hope that they pair off and will lay eggs on some flat "movable" objects. My plan is to remove the objects with the eggs into a smaller 5-10 gallon tank and grow the babies in there. My plan is:

    1. I was thinking about using an under gravel filter with powerheads to move and filter an adequate amount of water as well keep a sponge filter going. I intend to move the sponge filter into the 10 gallon tank with the eggs as well as some of the water from the 55 gallon tank.

    2. I use R/O water in most of my other tanks. Am I better off using regular Los Angeles tap water (made safe for fish)?

    3. I have a few planted tanks and am considering planting this tank as well. Will I have better results if the fish have plenty of plants to hide in and separate themselves when they pair off? Will the intense lighting needed for the plants hinder pairing off or egg laying.

    4. I've read different articles about the best temperature for angelfish. I currently have them in one tank at 82F and another at 79F. They seem to do just fine in either environment.

    I would appreciate any ideas, suggestions or strategies that others have used successfully.

    Thanks in advance ...... Mike
    A 55g is probably the minimum size tank for your plans and long term for fully grown angels 6-8 is maybe not heavily stocked depeding on your filtration but perhaps a bit crowded. Angels are a tall fish and like a deep tank, especially the Altrum variety.

    Speaking of varieties, know there are several. I think the vail variety are more elegant, showier fish.

    If you buy small angels, it will take about a year until they are ready to breed. Sexying them can be difficult especially as juviniles so you may want to buy extras to start with and trade or sell them back later, once you have them sexed.

    The foam filter or filters are fine, but consider a cannister filter for your main filter. Your plan could work, but I would have the 10 gallon set up and cycled before hand Moving water is not going to help a lot, but on the other hand shouldn't hurt anything provided the parmaters are good.

    If you have success with hatching fry, you need a grow out tank perhaps in the 30g range.

    Plant one or two Amazon Swords and they will likely lay their eggs on a leaf. When you are ready to transfer the eggs and parents, just clip that leaf, move it to the hatching tank with the parents and stick the leaf in the substrrate.

    1. I had 4 UGF in a 55g between 15-20 years ago. They were the hi-tech, coolest tool on the block and all the rage. I couldn't wait to rip my tank apart to install them (4 plates). The center pair I had rigged with lift tubes and air stones and filter cartridges at the top; the end plates with power heads. They were great for a while, until the mulm build up under the plates, and my tank started crashing. Periodically, every few months I had to do a complete tank tear down and rebuild. Eventually I was as anxious to take them out as I was to put them in. I have nothing good to say about UGF's.

    They may work for some people in some set-ups, but anything I'ver read in more currrent times, is that they are not advised for planted tanks which relates to Q3.


    2. R/O water vs tap water. Any municiple water should be safe. R/O water further filters it removing the minerals which you need. I would use dechlorinated, dechlorimed tap water, or aged tap water alloweing at least 24 hours to disapate chlorine and 3-5 days for chlorimine.


    3. Planted is the way to go. Angels love plants, Amazon Swords grow in their native habitat as well as tall grass like aquatic plants, like the Vallisneria varities . Their body evolved and adapted for living in and around plants, including their camoflage strips or speckeled marbling.

    Yes, your angels will be much better off and so will your success.

    Q. Will the intense lighting needed for the plants hinder pairing off or egg laying.
    A. No and no. Swords and Vals, do not require intense light. Your fish need light too.


    4. Angels are tolerant of a fairly high range of water parameters if acclimated; high 70's to 82F will work. My temp is normally 80.7F going up or down a few decimals depending on the roon temperature.

    If you want to keep and breed'em, read and know as much about them as you can. Here are some links that will get you started:

    Cichild Fish
    An Introduction To Cichlids
    Your First Cichlid Aquarium Note: The info provided maybe species specific
    How To Buy Healthy Cichlids

    South American Cichlids
    Altum Angelfish - Information about Altum Angelfish
    Angelfish / Scalare history - Information about Angelfish / Scalare history
    Angelfish Genetics, Types of angelfish - Learn more about angelfish genetics and different types of angelfish.v

    Breeding Angelfish
    Breeding/Rearing Aquarium Tanks - How to setup a good aquarium to raise fry in.
    Choosing the parents - An introduction to choosing the right fish for breeding.
    Equipment and breeding fish - An introduction to equipment and how to manage a breeding tank.
    Failed breedings - An article about failed breedings and how one can prevent the same thing from happening again.
    Feeding Fry - An article about how to feed your fry.
    Fish Spawning Methods - A introduction to the different
    Raising fry - An article about how to raise fry.
    Spawning Methods - An introduction to the different spawning methods that fish use.
    Tips for effective breeding - A few tips on how to successfully breed and raise fish.
    The Trouble With Hybrids - Read before selecting and breedingfish species


    For More Info:
    Google < Scalare >
    Wiki < Pterophyllum >
    Google < Pterophyllum >
    125g Planted Community - Rena XP-4, Rena XP3
    Angels, Dora Cory Cats, Glass Cat Fish, Gouramis, Scissor Tails, High Fin Black Skirt Tetras, Snails
    30g Working Tank as needed
    20g Planted Community - AC-70 Harlequin Rasboras, Neon Tetras, Dwarf African Frogs, Bamboo Shrimp, Snails
    1g 1 Siamese Fighting Fish, Snails
    Aquarium Resources Angel Fish Breeding Modifying Water Chemistry Pest Snail Control

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Thanks for taking the time to write such a detailed answer. It is much appreciated.

  4. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    No problem, I hope I helped. Sorry about the typos.

    I was thinking, instead of having a 10 gallon hatching tank which is only used briefly and a 30g + grow-out tank; one could get a 30-40g and partion one end for hatching. After the parents are moved back to their tank and the fry start to attain some size, remove the partion. Or if you get a breeding factory working, leave the partion, net the fry and put them in larger part of the tank.

    A partioned, dual purpose tank, may save space, and should save on the cost of heaters, filters, lights and maintainence labor (time).
    125g Planted Community - Rena XP-4, Rena XP3
    Angels, Dora Cory Cats, Glass Cat Fish, Gouramis, Scissor Tails, High Fin Black Skirt Tetras, Snails
    30g Working Tank as needed
    20g Planted Community - AC-70 Harlequin Rasboras, Neon Tetras, Dwarf African Frogs, Bamboo Shrimp, Snails
    1g 1 Siamese Fighting Fish, Snails
    Aquarium Resources Angel Fish Breeding Modifying Water Chemistry Pest Snail Control

  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    One of our members that breeds angels put them in 55 gallon grow out tanks. You figure each spawning is a few hundred and they spawn every couple of weeks. Obviously, the different ages have to be separated until they can be sold at around 3-4 months. A 10 gallon may work for the hatching of the eggs but will soon need far more room to grow out. Personally, I think it would take a couple 30-gallon tanks and some sponge filters if you wanted to get into this and also to make sure you have buyers for them.

    Eggs are moved into the breeder, fungal remover added to the water and the eggs are placed near a bubbler that works as if the parents were fanning them. A piece of slate works well leaning up against the wall for the parents to spawn on and then leaned against the wall of the breeder near the bubbler.

    You do not want an under gravel filter. The breeding tank must have water changes and cleaned daily.

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