Aquarium Forum
 


Menu
  · Tropical Fish Home
· Fish News
· Aquarium Forum
· Buy & Sell
· Calculators
· Equipment reviews
· Free Aquarium Ebook
· Feedback
· Link to us
· Photo gallery
· Plant species
· Tropica Plant DB
Tropical fish species
· By Common name
· By Scientific name
Tropical Marine fish
· By Common name
· By Scientific name

_________________
 
      
        Via paypal

  AC news is a part of
      Nature Blog Network

      Reef Aquarium Blog

Privacy & Ad Policy

Articles
  · African Cichlids
· Algae Control
· Aquarium Decoration
· Aquarium Resources
· Aquatic Plants
· Barb Fish
· Betta Fish
· Breeding Fish
· Catfish
· Central American Cichlids
· Cichlids
· Clownfish
· Corals
· Corydoras Catfish
· Discus Fish
· Dwarf Cichlids
· Fish Diseases
· Frogs and Turtles
· Goby Fish
· Goldfish
· Gourami
· Invertebrates
· Jellyfish
· Killiefish
· Lake Victoria Cichlids
· Livebearers
· Malawi Cichlids
· Marine Aquariums
· Marine Aquarium Fish
· Other Fish
· Pleco
· Predatory Fish
· Photography
· Pond Fish
· Responsible Fish Keeping
· Rainbow Fish
· Shark Fish
· South American Cichlids
· Tanganyika Cichlids
· Tetra Fish
· Tropical Fish Food
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. Default Advise on setting up a new 55 gallon tank


    0 Not allowed!
    I have asked for advise on disinfecting my 25 gallon tank setup which currently houses tiny bullhead catfish, I also have a 55 gallon setup which I am going to reset up after having to buy a new 55 gallon tank. A few months back I woke up and my 55 gallon tank brace that goes across was ripping and I had to immediately take out the fish and give them to the local fish store, a few weeks ago I bought a new tank at Petco when they had the dollar a gallon sale still on and I'm about ready to setup once again. My first question to ask for advise is that I use pool filter sand as my substrate, and before my tank started to bow due to the ripped brace I had an algae bloom on the sand probably due to a lighting problem, the bulb has been with the tank since I've bought it in 2008 and the tank was close to 15 yrs old at that time, so I'm sure the bulb was not producing enough wattage for the tank. This may not have been the reason for the dark green, hard algae problem but when all your water perimeters were right on and I also tried turning off the lights more often and even tried to decrease feeding of fish to very little which neither of these helped my last idea is that the wattage from the bulb has been causing this problem, and I had this problem a few years ago in Pennsylvania also. New bulb bought from Petco (check), new tank (check)...now should I keep my old sand and just rinse it out real well to get any old sediment and dead algae out of it or should I buy new sand? Also on my new tank there are all these labels stuck to the glass, what is the best way to get these off of the glass without leaving any gunky residue? I think before I set up the filter I'll replace the large sponge in my Aqua Clear 110 and start a fresh with that just in case,and since it is around 5 years old it probably couldn't hurt anyways. Thanks, and if you all have any advise I'd appreciate it.
    1--29 gallon tank: 1 small angelfish, pygmy cory, and 4 baby albino bristlenose.
    2--55 gallon tank: 1 adult angelfish, 7 black skirt tetras, 5 yo yo loaches, 1 synodontis catfish and 1 spotted raphael.
    3--3 gallon tank with female betta.

  2. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    In regards to the labels, if they are on the outside of the tank, you can use a scrapper and because not to scrath the tank, peel them off, and then use goo gone on it. That stuff works amazing.

    Pool filter sand is pretty cheap, I'd just replace and it start over new. If you decide to go with old, you could remove it from the old tank, add some algae killing medicines to it, and give it a good rinse...But I'd rather just have no substrate in the tank to try and keep the new from getting a bloom. Also, if you tank was getting any natural sunlight it could have caused the algae to boom, usually bad lighting on doesn't cause it, but have a lot of lighting (at least from my experiences.) The wattage and bulbs only really matter if your doing a planted tank.

    If you going to use the same filter, make sure you've cleaned it all out, doing a small bleach cleaning to make sure its killed any of the algae, you usually do a 9 parts water to one part bleach stick in for 15 min, then rinse it and let it soak in just water another 15 and make sure its all good and clean.

    If you start getting any algae again, you could always get some cleaner fish for it to keep it in check. I used to have a SAE back in the day and he kept everything in check.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Hey, thanks for replying, I'm not really sure what happened with the old tank and the algae bloom. Bought tank in Pennsylvania and set the old tank up back in March or April of 2008, and it wasn't long that the algae started to blossom. Used pool filter sand at that time also, thought it might be the sand but my other tanks were just fine. The algae would start to form on top of the sand as well as the sides, the 3 bristlenose that I put into the tank after the bloom started to get bad took care of the sides of the tank, however the algae bloom on top of the sand started to get thicker and when I would syphon the tank the algae would break off in clumps. I'm not sure if the old tank could have caused it but now that I have a new glass aquarium we'll see if this takes care of the problem. The tank is not in direct sunlight and the windows in the living room are all fixed to keep the sunlight out since it is an old house and we are living in Wichita Falls Tx., which gets hot, hot, hot. I am hoping the algae problem will be solved, and want to start raising some of the Multi (shell dwellers) bit they seem to be hard to find even on line.
    Quote Originally Posted by souly View Post
    In regards to the labels, if they are on the outside of the tank, you can use a scrapper and because not to scrath the tank, peel them off, and then use goo gone on it. That stuff works amazing.

    Pool filter sand is pretty cheap, I'd just replace and it start over new. If you decide to go with old, you could remove it from the old tank, add some algae killing medicines to it, and give it a good rinse...But I'd rather just have no substrate in the tank to try and keep the new from getting a bloom. Also, if you tank was getting any natural sunlight it could have caused the algae to boom, usually bad lighting on doesn't cause it, but have a lot of lighting (at least from my experiences.) The wattage and bulbs only really matter if your doing a planted tank.

    If you going to use the same filter, make sure you've cleaned it all out, doing a small bleach cleaning to make sure its killed any of the algae, you usually do a 9 parts water to one part bleach stick in for 15 min, then rinse it and let it soak in just water another 15 and make sure its all good and clean.

    If you start getting any algae again, you could always get some cleaner fish for it to keep it in check. I used to have a SAE back in the day and he kept everything in check.
    1--29 gallon tank: 1 small angelfish, pygmy cory, and 4 baby albino bristlenose.
    2--55 gallon tank: 1 adult angelfish, 7 black skirt tetras, 5 yo yo loaches, 1 synodontis catfish and 1 spotted raphael.
    3--3 gallon tank with female betta.

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Algae is caused by light and nutrients, and will be present in any and every aquarium if it is healthy. You don't mention live plants, but the only reason to really control algae is if you have plants. Plants use the nutrients and light, and if everything is balanced, they will "out-compete" the algae. But as soon as the balance is out, be it too much or too little light, or too many or too few nutrients for the plants, algae has an advantage. Different types of algae will occur in various tanks. I recall Rhonda Wilson, who used to write a plant column in TFH, saying she never really understood why one type of algae would always be problematic in one tank, with a different type of algae in another, when she had multiple tanks with identical lighting, etc. It is just one of those mysteries of life.

    Without live plants, algae is beneficial, as it then performs much the same role as plants, though to a much lesser extent. Algae use the nutrients and produce oxygen through photosynthesis. Aside from keeping the front glass clean, I wouldn't worry about algae in a tank with no plants. However, having said that, any algae mats on the substrate is something different and may be due to other problems.

    To your new tank. Toss out the old sand. Sand is very inexpensive and on the whole you might as well replace it. I don't know what type of pool sand you had, some is OK but some is not; and you should not have white sand at all. I use Quikrete Play Sand, and now have this in 5 of my 6 operating tanks. It takes some initial rinsing, but after that, it is about as perfect a substrate as you can have, for fish (substrate fish like corys and loaches love this stuff), plants, and it replicates the sands in Amazonian streams so it looks natural.

    I would also replace the filter media, including any pads.

    If you intend plants, we can discuss lighting if you like. And yes, algae will increase under weak lighting just as under bright lighting. In my planted tanks, if I leave the tubes in beyond their 12 months of decent intensity (fluorescent tubes weaken in intensity as they light, and eventually this becomes too little for the plants) I notice brush algae increasing; this is because the plants can no longer use the nutrients because the light is too weak, and algae takes advantage. So it works both ways.

    Hope this helps.

    Byron.
    Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
    Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

  5. #5

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Glen Arm. MD
    Posts
    2,635

    Awards Showcase

    Happy Christmas - MuckyFish thanks for advising on vegetables for my kribs! so here is a discus - ScottishFish You help a lot - PhillipOrigami For the bank account, and thx for the rep - Cliff beautiful discus! - Crispy 
    I know this doesn't help but it's all I can do! - chrisfraser05 for all the wise advice you've given me - fishmommie Congrats on 2000th post! - andreahp Merry Christmas! - fishmommie Merry Christmas - Cliff 
    Thanks for the rep :-) - ~firefly~ appreciate it. - fishmommie Thanks for the birthday wishes - mommy1 ٩(̾●̮̮̃̾•̃̾)۶ - korith For all the good advice you give. - ~firefly~ 
    Thanks for the rep the other day - Cliff thanks for the rep points.  appreciate it - fishmommie happy friday! - mojosodope Merry Christmas! - ~firefly~ Thanks for the rep! - steeler1 

    Exclamation


    0 Not allowed!
    Algae is a tough issue and often (but not always) is caused by either too much 'nutrient's - from various sources - and/or by the wrong light - color temp and/or intensity and/or duration.

    First off, we'd have needed to know your water parameters (nitrate most likely if the filter is working well.) Also, your issue does not seem to be algae but is rather a type of bacteria (the sand has a surface mat of heavy growth that holds together - that is not algae.) That type is most often caused by high nitrates - there are a number of ways to deal with it. Post some pictures if it starts again; generally, large water changes will prevent it.

    Also, the type of lights, 'wattage', color temp (if available) and how long you keep them on for. Yes, too low of intensity can help algae, too.

    If you are unsure, large water changes on a bi-weekly bases will always help any problem ... .

    Also, NEVER change your filter pads unless you want the tank filter bio-media to crash causing ammonia and/or nitrites to harm/kill your fish. Never remove/replace pads if they are the primary bio-media in your filter. Clean the pads using old tank water. If you have a lot of ceramic media, cleaning the pads and replacing some of the pads will not harm the filter. If it is the primary bio-media, that could wipe out the fish. Be careful when ever cleaning a filter - that is the #1 error a lot (I've done it, too!) of people make.

    Best of luck.
    Last edited by Cermet; 09-11-2013 at 01:33 PM. Reason: typo

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Saturday was the day I finally set up my 55 gallon once again. Rinsed out pool filter sand in bleach water and rinsed, rinsed, rinsed and rinsed and then put a full cap full of prime (enough for 50 gallons) with every 5 gallon bucket of water and a certain amount of sand. It took about 4-5 good 5 gallon buckets of sand rinsing to complete the process but it got done, cleaned out the AquaClear 500 by soaking in bleach water, rinsing really well and then sun drying for a few hours. I have cleaned my AquaClear 70 with bleach water, I also soaked the ceramic bio rings that are in a bag in bleach water and also the sponge filter in bleach water, did this many times and rinsed well and let to stand outside yesterday and last night outside to air dry. Question concerning this, will the ceramic bio rings and filter be O.K. after the bleach soak and drying process?, I am wanting to put this on the back of my 55 gallon as well to provide more filtration for the tank. I'm hoping that the ceramic rings will work at least, I can always buy another sponge if needed. Don't have a background for the tank yet, I do use aluminum foil for my small betta tanks and they look great but not sure how it would work on the back of a 55 gallon.
    1--29 gallon tank: 1 small angelfish, pygmy cory, and 4 baby albino bristlenose.
    2--55 gallon tank: 1 adult angelfish, 7 black skirt tetras, 5 yo yo loaches, 1 synodontis catfish and 1 spotted raphael.
    3--3 gallon tank with female betta.

  7. #7

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    I would have boiled the ceramics for 10-15 minutes. With that surface area it's a royal pain in the rear to get all the bleach out.

  8. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Didn't know you could boil the ceramics, thought it would destroy them?, I guess I could still do this today, do you think this would take care of the bleach or not?. I figure I would soak in some highly declorized water solution before attempting to put into tank.
    Quote Originally Posted by talldutchie View Post
    I would have boiled the ceramics for 10-15 minutes. With that surface area it's a royal pain in the rear to get all the bleach out.
    1--29 gallon tank: 1 small angelfish, pygmy cory, and 4 baby albino bristlenose.
    2--55 gallon tank: 1 adult angelfish, 7 black skirt tetras, 5 yo yo loaches, 1 synodontis catfish and 1 spotted raphael.
    3--3 gallon tank with female betta.

  9. #9

    Default


    1 Not allowed!
    I would never use bleach on filter media. It is not expensive to replace the media. Aside from the fish, I am wondering if bleach residue would prevent bacteria colonizing.
    Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
    Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

  10. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Just got done setting up my AC 70 in my 55 gallon, boiled the ceramics and sponge for around 25 minutes. With the double filtration going I am hoping that I can in a month or so redo my 25 gallon setup and have the filter media already or close to colonized. I do have a few black skirts in the tank to help with getting the tank going, have used them before back in 2008 and the two I had then in Pennsylvania died only because we moved back to Texas.
    1--29 gallon tank: 1 small angelfish, pygmy cory, and 4 baby albino bristlenose.
    2--55 gallon tank: 1 adult angelfish, 7 black skirt tetras, 5 yo yo loaches, 1 synodontis catfish and 1 spotted raphael.
    3--3 gallon tank with female betta.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •