Aquarium Forum
 


Menu
  · Tropical Fish Home
· Fish News
· Aquarium Forum
· Buy & Sell
· Calculators
· Equipment reviews
· Free Aquarium Ebook
· Feedback
· Link to us
· Photo gallery
· Plant species
· Tropica Plant DB
Tropical fish species
· By Common name
· By Scientific name
Tropical Marine fish
· By Common name
· By Scientific name

_________________
 
      
        Via paypal

  AC news is a part of
      Nature Blog Network

      Reef Aquarium Blog

Privacy & Ad Policy

Articles
  · African Cichlids
· Algae Control
· Aquarium Decoration
· Aquarium Resources
· Aquatic Plants
· Barb Fish
· Betta Fish
· Breeding Fish
· Catfish
· Central American Cichlids
· Cichlids
· Clownfish
· Corals
· Corydoras Catfish
· Discus Fish
· Dwarf Cichlids
· Fish Diseases
· Frogs and Turtles
· Goby Fish
· Goldfish
· Gourami
· Invertebrates
· Jellyfish
· Killiefish
· Lake Victoria Cichlids
· Livebearers
· Malawi Cichlids
· Marine Aquariums
· Marine Aquarium Fish
· Other Fish
· Pleco
· Predatory Fish
· Photography
· Pond Fish
· Responsible Fish Keeping
· Rainbow Fish
· Shark Fish
· South American Cichlids
· Tanganyika Cichlids
· Tetra Fish
· Tropical Fish Food
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. Default Found babies, Auratus hybrids?


    0 Not allowed!
    So a few nights ago I noticed some movement in the rocks during feeding time in my mbuna aquarium. I looked closer and it was a fry. I knew something was up with the Auratus being so aggressive lately and the weird bulge under its mouth. I knew that in african cichlids this meant they were holding babies but I'd thought mine was just holding food or something because my fish are so small, the Auratus is only 2" long if even that.

    Well, its the only Auratus in there, its tank mates are an acei, a red zebra, and a kenyi that is starting to turn yellow (meaning its a male) the acei is still being picked on, as well as the kenyi. The red zebra was too aggressive and moved out 2 weeks ago into a temporary 10 gallon, and yesterday I picked up a 30 gallon to put all of the big fish into because I didnt want them with the babies. Am I right to remov the big fish? Should I also remove the mother, the Auratus? Shes doing what Im guessing is her motherly job and keeping the other 2 at the top and goes after them if they try to come down.

    Needed info, is the red zebra the dad or is the kenyi the dad? the kenyi was pushing away the acei, as if protecting the babies, but also, the red zebra was excessively aggressive too. Then again, the red zebra was aggressive with everyone and so that might have just been its general attitude, having nothing to do with the babies. I didn't even know that different species could cross breed. If the kenyi is the dad, what will the offspring look like? the Auratus is the yellow variety with black stripes.

    Also, about the new 30 gallon, my plan is to put all the bigger fish in there and leave the fry alone. then when the fry get big enough for me to catch all of them without hurting them, swap the fry with the big fish so the big fish can have their bigger home in my display tank. Im not sure how many fry there are, I count about 10, hiding under the big rocks. they come out and catch food as it flies by (I started feeding tropical flakes when I saw the fry trying to eat bits of the cichlid pellets) the new 30 gallon will be bare, only a heater, filter, and the decorations, but no subtrates on the bottom. I will put all 4 of the big ones in there, including the previously separated red zebra; and the tank will go in the laundry room because I already have 3 other tanks in the house and the only other option is to put this new tank outside under the porch...

    Let me know what you guys think, thanks!
    Last edited by Cyberghost; 04-27-2012 at 09:00 PM.

  2. #2

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    im not sure about which one might be the father but i would say that it is not the best thing to do to take the rest of the fish out. if you are really interested in keeping the fry you could set up a fry tank and let her have her next batch of fry in that tank, or you could strip her(remove the babies from her mouth) while holding her in the fry tank. either way, the fry are to be removed from your main tank, not your stock.
    Coastie-to-be... hopefully.

  3. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Northerly
    im not sure about which one might be the father but i would say that it is not the best thing to do to take the rest of the fish out. if you are really interested in keeping the fry you could set up a fry tank and let her have her next batch of fry in that tank, or you could strip her(remove the babies from her mouth) while holding her in the fry tank. either way, the fry are to be removed from your main tank, not your stock.
    Right, of course that makes perfect sense and was my thought too. But, the reason that I decided not to do this, though, is that mom isnt holding the fry anymore, they are hiding under all the decorations and since the substrate is large round pebbles, removing the fry would be difficult and risky.

  4. #4

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    I had this problem a few months ago. I had an unexpected batch of Yellow Lab fry. All I did was get out my fry net, and stick it to the inside of the tank, to have it on stand by. I added a few more things to my tank, like rocks and plants for the fry to hide around, and just waited until the opportunity popped up for me to net the fry when they came out into the open water. The ones I couldn't catch actually did very well at surviving with the extra hiding places. I think I netted 6 or 7, and the other 6 or 7 that were free swimming all made it, and are now an inch and a half to two inches long.
    Three-fourths of the Earth's surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as taking care of the lawn. ~Chuck Clark

  5. #5

    Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyberghost
    ...the kenyi was pushing away the acei, as if protecting the babies, but also, the red zebra was excessively aggressive too...
    Male mbuna's are not paternal and will not care for or defend their progeny. The activity you observed was typical mbuna aggression.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyberghost
    Let me know what you guys think, thanks!
    What is your plan for these fry?

    If they're part kenyi or red zebra (both members of the metriaclima genus) this batch of fry are destined to be highly-aggressive melanochromis-metriaclima hybrids.

    Keeping them all long term is not a likely option, at least as far as the male fry are concerned due to their aggression-potential (it's extremely difficult to keep multiple matured male auratus or kenyi's in the same tank for long without eliminations occuring and this may apply to these hybrid fry).

    There's not much market for a hybrid mbuna's, and disseminating mbuna-hybrids is usually frowned upon.

    I know this may sound harsh but: I'd get a larger tank, construct proper gender-ratio's among the species you have to diminish the likelihood of hybridization and let these fry fend for themselves among the larger fish.
    African cichlid and saltwater aquariums

    http://www.rowelab.com/AquaControlle...9&scope=last24

  6. Default


    0 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by kaybee
    What is your plan for these fry?
    To be honest, I really don't know. I really have to rethink what I want to do, I wanted Africans but I went into it blindly, not really knowing about each species, what would work and what wouldn't. I thought it'd be easy since I had so much experience with regular tropical/community fish.

    Quote Originally Posted by kaybee
    If they're part kenyi or red zebra (both members of the metriaclima genus) this batch of fry are destined to be highly-aggressive melanochromis-metriaclima hybrids.

    Keeping them all long term is not a likely option, at least as far as the male fry are concerned due to their aggression-potential (it's extremely difficult to keep multiple matured male auratus or kenyi's in the same tank for long without eliminations occuring and this may apply to these hybrid fry). There's not much market for a hybrid mbuna's, and disseminating mbuna-hybrids is usually frowned upon.
    Guess this is to be expected

    Quote Originally Posted by kaybee
    I know this may sound harsh but: I'd get a larger tank, construct proper gender-ratio's among the species you have to diminish the likelihood of hybridization and let these fry fend for themselves among the larger fish.
    So, leave the fry to fend for themselves... Not a big deal, except for mom Auratus is still there, and seems like she's going to continue to aggressively defend her fry.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •