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fishmommie
10-20-2012, 08:46 PM
Can I feed my pleco too much zucchini? the little stinker goes through a 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick round slice (approx 1 - 1/2 inch diameter) almost every day. Of course, the lunker snails are eating it too but still .... I've been replacing the rind with a fresh piece every day
It's an albino BNP - about 2 inches long now. He also has his bog wood to suck on and I toss in algae wafers once or twice a week for both him and the snails and the cory cats. Also feed peas once a week and watermelon if I have it.
thanks

escamosa
10-20-2012, 09:16 PM
The little stinker!! :hmm3grin2orange: Poor little guy! You're doing exactly the right thing for him, in my opinion! He'd be loving it, in that tank! They like broccoli too, if you'd like to try him on something else! Quite a lot of people fall into the trap of JUST feeding Bristlies algea based foods, and let them constantly clean up their tanks. Their proper diet is vegetable matter, and they supplement that diet with algea. If they are left to eat just algea and whatever the other fish leave laying around, they can get intestinal problems or starve. So keep giving the little stinker :hmm3grin2orange: his vegies, and he'll love you for it!

fishmommie
10-20-2012, 09:19 PM
So keep giving the little stinker :hmm3grin2orange: his vegies, and he'll love you for it!

That must be why he waves to me whenever I walk by the tank :l19:
and thanks. I'll keep looking for variety for him.

escamosa
10-20-2012, 10:04 PM
Aww, he's not a stinker! He sounds like he's a cutie! :hmm3grin2orange:

fishmommie
10-20-2012, 10:20 PM
Aww, he's not a stinker! He sounds like he's a cutie! :hmm3grin2orange:

he's adorable! (NEVER thought I'd say that about a pleco) And 'stinker' was an affectionate term :11:

How old are they before they get their bristles? I've not seen even a nubbin on his nose. He's probably grown 1/2 and inch since I got him ... maybe more. He was really tiny

escamosa
10-20-2012, 10:51 PM
I think it all depends on whether it's a male or a female. The females will grow smaller bristles around its snout, while the males will grow larger ones around its snout and on his head. Quite often you won't see any bristles until the fish has grown to around 2 1/2 - 3 inches. But like i said, I'm pretty sure that still depends on the bristlies sex.

fishmommie
10-20-2012, 11:16 PM
Thanks, Chris
Shouldn't be much longer now then and he or she should start to have some little sprouts :19:

escamosa
10-20-2012, 11:21 PM
You're more than welcome! They're a great little pleco! One of my favorites! thumbs2:

fishmommie
10-21-2012, 12:07 AM
You're more than welcome! They're a great little pleco! One of my favorites! thumbs2:

Here's my little guy :o)

http://i614.photobucket.com/albums/tt227/cindygerard/babyp028.jpg

escamosa
10-21-2012, 01:42 PM
Chowin' down on the driftwood! :hmm3grin2orange:

Taurus
10-21-2012, 02:16 PM
Their proper diet is vegetable matter, and they supplement that diet with algea. If they are left to eat just algea and whatever the other fish leave laying around, they can get intestinal problems or starve. So keep giving the little stinker :hmm3grin2orange: his vegies, and he'll love you for it!

Really? I didn't know that vegetable matter was grown in the rivers and streams of South America. :ezpi_wink1:

All joking aside, they need protein in there diet too. Bet you need see a BN pleco turn up his nose at blood worms.

fishmommie
10-22-2012, 12:06 AM
they need protein in there diet too. Bet you need see a BN pleco turn up his nose at blood worms.

I have only ever fed freeze dried blood worms - sometimes to my betta and for treats in my tetra tank. Are there frozen blood worms? If not, not sure how the pleco would ever get any to eat as they'd never sink.

escamosa
10-22-2012, 08:17 AM
Really? I didn't know that vegetable matter was grown in the rivers and streams of South America. :ezpi_wink1:

All joking aside, they need protein in there diet too. Bet you need see a BN pleco turn up his nose at blood worms.

Well, they don't exactly grow carrots and peas in the rivers, but there is aquatic plants, which is vegetation, and I think that's concidered as vegetable matter! :ezpi_wink1:

I'm sure that they will have a bit of a snack on some bloodworms at times, or left overs from the other fishes in the tank, but if the Bristlies only get that sort of stuff, they can get sick and die. I imagine that all fish would add some protien to thier diet at some point, but some just don't need a lot of it, and if a high protien diet is forced on them then you can have problems. The algea wafers contain enough protein for Bristlies. They also have to feed on small amounts of the driftwood or bogwood to help them digest anything that they have eaten that is high in protein, if no vegetable matter is provided. In my opinion, Bristlies do just fine without being forced to eat high protein foods, and grow better without too much of it.

Taurus
10-22-2012, 12:49 PM
I have only ever fed freeze dried blood worms - sometimes to my betta and for treats in my tetra tank. Are there frozen blood worms? If not, not sure how the pleco would ever get any to eat as they'd never sink.

Yes, blood worms are frozen as well. They can be found in the frozen foods section of your LFS. If you soak freeze dried blood worms in a container of tank water for a few minutes and then dump the container into the tank, a few worms may fall to the bottom. I find it easier just to drop in a sinking bottom feeder tablet (not an algae wafer) or sinking shrimp pellets a couple of time per week.

Taurus
10-22-2012, 01:06 PM
I'm sure that they will have a bit of a snack on some bloodworms at times, or left overs from the other fishes in the tank, but if the Bristlies only get that sort of stuff, they can get sick and die. I imagine that all fish would add some protien to thier diet at some point, but some just don't need a lot of it, and if a high protien diet is forced on them then you can have problems. The algea wafers contain enough protein for Bristlies. They also have to feed on small amounts of the driftwood or bogwood to help them digest anything that they have eaten that is high in protein, if no vegetable matter is provided. In my opinion, Bristlies do just fine without being forced to eat high protein foods, and grow better without too much of it.

Oh yes! All I'm suggesting is to feed BN plecos an occasional high protein treat. The average protein content of Hikari bottom feeder tabs or algae wafers is around 35%. The bottom feeder tabs are small compared to the algae wafers. Either choice coupled with fresh melon, zucchini, cucumber will lead to very healthy BN plecos.

I think I would blanch broccoli, green beans, ect first or nuke them in the microwave for a few seconds before I put them in the tank just to soften or brake the top layer of cellulose.

Taurus
10-22-2012, 01:49 PM
Can I feed my pleco too much zucchini?

Bottom line is I don't think you can. BN plecos seems to be able to eat and poop at the same time. It's a question of how much do you want to clean up after them because the more plant matter they eat, the more they........

Here's the path that I would follow.........

Drop zucchini into tank at 8 am or 8 pm and take it out no later than 12 hours later. Leave tank without zucchini for the next 12 hours. Be prepared to do a bit of extra gravel vacuuming and water changing.

fishmommie
10-22-2012, 02:32 PM
Thanks for all the great suggestions guys. I love this forum so much because members like you two are so helpful and full of ideas. Every post turns into an education!thumbs2:

MuckyFish
10-23-2012, 10:51 PM
Algae and vegetable eaters can be like food processors.
I don't see any extra pooping related to the timing of the veges placed in the tank. Unless its at night when I am not around.

As an aside I gave up blanching, sometimes it takes a while for the vegies to soften. I leave the strip of zucchini longer 24 - 48 because its not blanched and the snails either consume the left over rind or it is removed.

As a thought, these plecos are usually from amazon basin rivers with shores lined with trees that presumably drop fruit in the river from time to time. It wouldn't surprise me if some of these plecos fed on fallen fruits such as Jaca (no evidence and have not seen it) as part of their diet.

Taurus
10-24-2012, 03:08 PM
I don't see any extra pooping related to the timing of the veges placed in the tank. Unless its at night when I am not around.


LOL...I was only half joking. Pleocs poop so much it just seems like they eat and poop at the same time. Anyone that has a BN pleco and vacuums the gravel on a regular basis knows what I mean.

:ssmile:

Fishies' Mom
10-26-2012, 03:37 AM
'Alfred', a now 8" common pleco, will polish off a 1.5 inch long, 2 inch in diameter hunk of zucchini almost overnight! He'd do it every night if I kept up with him! I stick it on a stainless salad fork and bury the handle in the gravel - it gives it a good foundation and Alfred can really scrape away at it.

I usually put three or four 1/4" slices in as floaters (swordtails, mollies, and tiger barbs also enjoy), and Alfred will swim up to the top when his chunk is gone and suck on the slices at the top of the tank. He looks very impressive, upsidedown, gnawing away on a floating slice of zucchini! Alfred is cool; we need to trade him in soon, as he's just getting a bit big for our tank. We keep putting it off - we're going to miss him!

fishmommie
10-26-2012, 04:02 AM
They do love their zucchini! I'll have to try to float some slices. I bought some veggie clips that have magnets. Now I just attach a round of zucchini or a carrot to the clip, and guide it to the bottom with the magnet and anchor it there. Works great and now I'm not constantly fishing around with tongs to get the rinds out. Usually, there's not much left but still have to retrieve the anchor so the magnetic clip is great.

I hear you on not wanting to part with the big guy. I had a common in my 30 and traded him when he got about 4 inches because I was already attached to him and knew the longer I kept him the harder it would be to let him go.

Now I have a baby albino bristlenose. cutest little thing and grows very slowly - should only bet about 4 inches max.

Fishies' Mom
10-26-2012, 04:33 AM
I'll have to look into veggie clips . . .

We feed tubifex worms from Haakari that come in little freeze-dried cubes and they float. I rigged a plant sinker, making a small loop by bending it over on one end and stringing fishing line (about 18 in.) through it and tying it to a round tinker-toy piece on the other end. We can place up to two cubes in the plant sinker by simply bending the sinker over the cubes and squeezing it tight. When the fish are done eating, we simply 'fish' the sinker out with the fishing line. Easy-peasy thumbs2: ! The tinker toy more keeps the contraption from getting lost in our fish food basket; it's easier to locate than a plant sinker, but it also floats if the line falls into the water somehow, so we aren't elbowed-up in water to get the plant sinker back out.

fishmommie
10-26-2012, 04:37 AM
I'll have to look into veggie clips . . .

We feed tubifex worms from Haakari that come in little freeze-dried cubes and they float. I rigged a plant sinker, making a small loop by bending it over on one end and stringing fishing line (about 18 in.) through it and tying it to a round tinker-toy piece on the other end. We can place up to two cubes in the plant sinker by simply bending the sinker over the cubes and squeezing it tight. When the fish are done eating, we simply 'fish' the sinker out with the fishing line. Easy-peasy thumbs2: ! The tinker toy more keeps the contraption from getting lost in our fish food basket; it's easier to locate than a plant sinker, but it also floats if the line falls into the water somehow, so we aren't elbowed-up in water to get the plant sinker back out.

I'm trying to wrap my mind around this and can't figure out what you're using for a 'plant sinker'. I often wrap a tiny rubber band around a rock and attach the tubiflex worms to it. have attached dental floss to it once or twice to avoid having to fish it out but worry that the fish might cut their fins on the floss LOL

Fishies' Mom
10-26-2012, 04:55 AM
Here's a link - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Blue-Ribbon-Aquarium-Plant-Sinkers-Anchors-Weights-12pk-/200699219543

They're great for holding down the smaller artificial plants.
And floating fish food, as it turns out :hmm3grin2orange: !

fishmommie
10-26-2012, 05:09 AM
Here's a link - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Blue-Ribbon-Aquarium-Plant-Sinkers-Anchors-Weights-12pk-/200699219543

They're great for holding down the smaller artificial plants.
And floating fish food, as it turns out :hmm3grin2orange: !

ah. got it. i've never seen them before
thanks

Fishies' Mom
10-26-2012, 05:12 AM
Love 'em. Cheap and useful! They do wear out eventually, but last a long, long time.

Taurus
10-26-2012, 02:28 PM
They do love their zucchini! I'll have to try to float some slices. I bought some veggie clips that have magnets. Now I just attach a round of zucchini or a carrot to the clip, and guide it to the bottom with the magnet and anchor it there. Works great and now I'm not constantly fishing around with tongs to get the rinds out. Usually, there's not much left but still have to retrieve the anchor so the magnetic clip is great.



OMG...why do you have to make everything sooooo complicated? :tease: :wink:

Stick a fork into a slice of zuchinni and let it sink to the bottom, just make sure the points of the tines are pointed downward into the gravel. Works for me. Easy, peasy. :ssmile:

fishmommie
10-26-2012, 04:42 PM
OMG...why do you have to make everything sooooo complicated? :tease: :wink:
You already know why, Larry. It's what I do :o)

Stick a fork into a slice of zuchinni and let it sink to the bottom, just make sure the points of the tines are pointed downward into the gravel. Works for me. Easy, peasy. :ssmile:
Yeah but then there's a fork in my tank. I'll stick with the veggie clips thumbs2: