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Angelfish69
01-30-2012, 07:39 PM
I set up my tank almost a week ago, for tropical fish.
I used tap safe, first day it was ok and from then onwards it was misty, im talking so misty you cant see anything, i done a 50% water change yesterday and although its not as bad it is still misty.
I know you get new tank syndrome etc, What do i need to do next?
I cleaned the gravel well .
Its driving me mad...please help!:sconfused:

Fishin Phil
01-30-2012, 07:40 PM
Did you put any fish in yet, or are you doing a fishless cycle? What do you need to do next? I would read the cycling primers in this section.

Good luck!

Dave66
01-30-2012, 07:45 PM
Welcome to the forum!

As to what to do next: Be patient. No rushing a tank.

Dave

Cliff
01-30-2012, 07:45 PM
The cloudiness likely came from your substrate if you did not wash it very well. Another water change should help

+1 to the above post, you should cycle you tank first before adding fish. Cycling will allow you to grow the good bacteria that you need to keep your fish alive

There is a link to the fishless cycling process below in my sig

Angelfish69
01-30-2012, 08:04 PM
[QUOTE=Fishin Phil]Did you put any fish in yet, or are you doing a fishless cycle? What do you need to do next? I would read the cycling primers in this section.

Good luck![/QUOTE
i was doing a fishless cycle.
I got a water test done today and was all clear, i bought 2 angels and a plec, both angels died within two hours :scry: but the plec is ok.

Angelfish69
01-30-2012, 08:05 PM
The cloudiness likely came from your substrate if you did not wash it very well. Another water change should help

+1 to the above post, you should cycle you tank first before adding fish. Cycling will allow you to grow the good bacteria that you need to keep your fish alive

There is a link to the fishless cycling process below in my sig
Whats the substrate?

Fishin Phil
01-30-2012, 08:06 PM
I don't think you were really doing a fishless cycle. Check the link that Cliff gave you.

sheamurai
01-30-2012, 08:14 PM
HOw long did it take to cycle your tank?

It doesn't sound like it was near long enough, if your fish died.

Leaving an empty tank to run for a few days is not cycling it.
By cycling a tank, we mean that you breed the beneficial bacteria it takes to process fish waste. So, you have to feed a tank waste to get the bacteria to start breeding. We prefer to do this without actual fish because ammonia is toxic to fish, as you just found out.

You have fish in the tank now, so you either need to bring the pleco back and complete your fishless cycle, or you need to do large water changes every day so your pleco doesn't die too.

Reading the articles suggested above will explain the process better.

Now, your fish shouldn't have died after two hours of putting them into the tank. Did you just dump them in right away, or did you give them time to get used to the temperature and pH of their new home? The water might have been quite different from the store that you got them from, or even the bag might have cooled off during transit, and you could have shocked them by dropping them into a tank very different from what they were just in.

Some other information would be helpful too - how big is the tank, how long did you take to set it up, what kind of filter do you have on it, do you have a heater and what temp is it set at, what kind of stuff did you cover the bottom with? Do you have any live plants or other decorations?

Cliff
01-30-2012, 08:16 PM
The below link also has a lot of helpful information about the questions that you are asking

http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/ebook.html

Angelfish69
01-30-2012, 08:22 PM
HOw long did it take to cycle your tank?

It doesn't sound like it was near long enough, if your fish died.

Leaving an empty tank to run for a few days is not cycling it.
By cycling a tank, we mean that you breed the beneficial bacteria it takes to process fish waste. So, you have to feed a tank waste to get the bacteria to start breeding. We prefer to do this without actual fish because ammonia is toxic to fish, as you just found out.

You have fish in the tank now, so you either need to bring the pleco back and complete your fishless cycle, or you need to do large water changes every day so your pleco doesn't die too.

Reading the articles suggested above will explain the process better.

Now, your fish shouldn't have died after two hours of putting them into the tank. Did you just dump them in right away, or did you give them time to get used to the temperature and pH of their new home? The water might have been quite different from the store that you got them from, or even the bag might have cooled off during transit, and you could have shocked them by dropping them into a tank very different from what they were just in.

Some other information would be helpful too - how big is the tank, how long did you take to set it up, what kind of filter do you have on it, do you have a heater and what temp is it set at, what kind of stuff did you cover the bottom with? Do you have any live plants or other decorations?

Thankyou,
I left them in the bag for 20 mins as store requested.
They were only in the car 10 mins as i went straight home.
My heater is set at 27, No live plants as yet.
tank is 3ft, i use small black gravel.

sheamurai
01-30-2012, 08:27 PM
well, leaving the bag to float would allow some time for the temperature to equalise (tho I always take at least 45 min to an hour to do that). There would still be a possibility of pH shock if you didn't add some tank water to the bag before you put them in. If you are only ten minutes away from the store, tho, that really shouldn't be an issue either.

Do you have city water? Did you treat the water with conditioner to remove the chlorine/chloramine?

Not sure what else could kill fish in two hours...ammonia poisoning shouldn't have happened quite that fast...

Angelfish69
01-30-2012, 09:37 PM
The ph, Amonia, nitrate and nitrite was tested in the water sameple i done this morning.
I used Tap safe?? Is that the conditioner?
Should i do a 30% wter change now ive got a fish? Just id need to add cold water and id imagine not good idea with a fish?

kross
01-31-2012, 01:15 AM
First off, welcome to the AC! I'm sorry you're having a hard time with your new fish. I'll try to explain what I think is happening.

Fish waste and decomposing uneaten food produce ammonia, which is toxic to fish. Fortunately, beneficial bacteria grow in your tank that convert the ammonia into nitrites (also toxic) and then into nitrates (much less toxic).

But it takes time for this beneficial bacteria to establish itself in the tank (several weeks to a month, sometimes longer). In the meantime, you need to watch the ammonia and nitrite levels in your tank, and do water changes to keep the levels safe (less than 0.25 ppm, with 0 ppm being ideal). This usually means doing 50% water changes every day, sometimes more. This is only until the bacteria colony builds up. After that, once a week is fine. And you should add new fish very slowly, no more than one or two new fish every couple weeks, to let the bacteria catch up to the new bioload.

As to why your fish died in two hours, it wasn't ammonia poisoning. It most likely was shock of some sort, pH being the most likely. In addition to floating the bag in the tank for a while to equalize the temperature, you should also pour a small amount of tank water into the bag every few minutes, to slowly get your new fish used to your water parameters. If you run out of room in the bag for more water, dump some out (not into the tank!) to make room for more.

After about 45 minutes, you can put your new fish into your tank. Don't dump the water in the bag into the tank. What I do is hold a net over a bucket, and pour the bag into the net to catch the fish. Then release the fish into the tank. The reason you don't want to add the fish store's water into your tank is that increases the chance of introducing disease into your tank.

Hope this helps!
-- Kevin

kross
01-31-2012, 01:26 AM
Here's a video demonstrating the acclimation process described above:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g37aRaXNJjU

sheamurai
01-31-2012, 01:26 AM
So what were the test results?

And yes, you need to keep doing water changes otherwise that fish will die as well. You should try to add water the same temperature as the tank water - just add some warm water to the cold from the tap until it feels close - it doesn't have to be exact.

How long has your tank been running?

Angelfish69
01-31-2012, 08:17 AM
I didnt see the results, she just said it was perfect!
Ill get it redone today, ill a 50% change as well.
The other fish is still alive today :goldfish: So thats good.
I wasnt aware i could add warm water so thats a bonus

pjaldave
01-31-2012, 08:39 AM
are you getting your water to the lfs to be tested? i would suggest buying your own test kit for that matter. and please use the liquid ones and not the strips, as strips are more inaccurate.

i am mostly sure you did not do a fishless cycle if you just waited a week before adding the fish. check out the link in cliff's sig about cycling with and without fish.

make sure you always put water conditioner (dechlorinator) before putting new water into the tank when doing water changes. and when putting back water, it is best to add in water the same temperature as your tank water. not cold and not hot.

you need to know your exact water parameters to know how much water you should change.

kurly
01-31-2012, 12:32 PM
Hi Angelfish69 :ssmile:
Sounds like you're having a rough time starting off :scry: I hope your remaining fish survives. If by chance your fish doesn't make it, then I strongly encourage you to complete a Fishless Cycle before buying any more fish and adding them to your tank. The "Fishless Cycle" Sticky can be found in the same area of the "Beginners Freshwater" Forum.

As others have already said, Get your liquid test kit (API) as soon as possible. It's very important for you to know exactly what your water parameters are every day and to make the necessary water changes to keep the ammonia level under .25 since you are cycling with fish. 0 ammonia is where you want to be.

You've come to the right place. Read the Sticky's mentioned and continue to ask questions when you don't understand something. As you see, everyone is willing to help those who are having problems.

Good Luck and keep us posted!

Fishin Phil
01-31-2012, 12:36 PM
Glad to hear one of the fish made it. You can do a cycle with the remaining fish, it just requires more work on your part. As mentioned above, you should get your own water test kit. You'll need to monitor your water every day for a while, and be ready to do water changes anytime your ammonia or nitrites increase.

Hang in there, and good luck!

Angelfish69
01-31-2012, 12:40 PM
thankyopu for your advice, ive done a 50% water change today.
Ill keep a close eye on it.
Feel bad for the fish i lost yesterday:scry:

Fishin Phil
01-31-2012, 12:41 PM
While it is always sad to lose a fish, but we all make mistakes. As long as you learned from your mistake, it is not a total loss.

sheamurai
02-01-2012, 12:06 AM
If you keep up with the daily water changes, you shouldn't lose anymore fish.

When it comes time to start adding fish again, remember to only add a few at a time, or you will end up doing this all over again. The bacteria need time to multiply enough to be able to process more fishy waste.

I'm sure you did have perfect water - as it wasn't cycled yet. A cycled tank should have 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites, and low but not zero nitrates. 0 nitrates is a sign that your tank is not cycled. If you took a water sample in of the water directly after your fish were dying, you likely would have gotten a reading that wasn't so perfect.