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Abbeys_Mom
04-16-2011, 04:14 PM
I read a couple of posts online where people have used staples to affix their rhizome plants to driftwood. Has anyone here tried it?

Rue
04-16-2011, 04:38 PM
I've used fishing line. But I don't see why you can't use staples. They will rust, but I don't think the rust is a problem...

Tango
04-16-2011, 06:08 PM
I've used fishing line. But I don't see why you can't use staples. They will rust, but I don't think the rust is a problem...

Wouldn't the rust change the properties of the water?

Lady Hobbs
04-16-2011, 10:04 PM
I staple used the stables. Works fine.

LOLOLOL

ooops-eeeeeeee :hmm3grin2orange: :hmm3grin2orange: :hmm3grin2orange:

I meant I have used staples. *sheesh*

dbosman
04-16-2011, 10:17 PM
As long as you don't cut the rhizome when stapling it, all will be well.
I use gel type super glue or rubber bands.

Rue
04-16-2011, 10:46 PM
Wouldn't the rust change the properties of the water?

Change the properties of the water? How so? It might add a little iron, but not enough to hurt anything. There's nothing inherently dangerous about rust...

You more likely to change things up during a routine water change than a what a bit of rust off a staple or two would do...

Dave66
04-16-2011, 10:55 PM
The upshot is that putting metals in an aquarium is a bad idea, and it always has been. People used to put pennies in aquariums, back when the pennies were copper, then couldn't figure out why their tank failed.

In the closed system aquariums are, a 'little rust' can be a disaster. Why for goodness sake would one take a chance and not use thread to tie on rhizomes?

Staples? Phooey.

Dave

Rue
04-16-2011, 11:06 PM
Copper is a different metal.

I've never come across any indication that rust is even toxic - unless of course you're consuming huge amounts...but huge amounts of anything...including water...is toxic.

Sweet-iron bits are a favourite amongst horsemen. Cast iron frying pans tend to rust...and apparently the iron it gives off is considered a health benefit. Iron already occurs naturally in many water sources...

Abbeys_Mom
04-16-2011, 11:15 PM
I was concerned because I have had a problem in the past with rust in an aquarium. I had a 6 inch rusty screw holding a piece of slate to some driftwood and it reeked havoc in my tank for almost a year. I used yarn to tie the java moss on the big piece of driftwood that I have, but I wanted to add a small portion of java moss to piece of driftwood that is breaching the surface of my tank and with it being such a small amount, I figured a staple would just look nicer...

Rue
04-16-2011, 11:24 PM
If you're at all concerned. Tie it on with a bit of fishing line. If you're careful, you won't notice that the line is there at all.

Abbeys_Mom
04-16-2011, 11:28 PM
I just used more yarn. I used a bit extra so I could hold the driftwood in place. I looped the yarn at the top of the tank and taped it to the rim.

Cermet
04-17-2011, 12:39 AM
If rust is an issue and this is fresh water, stainless steel staples will work fine - the point about a closed system is correct for many people since water changes are rare. Then a large bit of rusting iron can cause toxic levels to be reached (# One poison of children is - Iron. Many children's (read VERY sweet) vitamins that contain iron can be deadly and those should NEVER be kept on hand with young children - just not worth the danger.)

Strider199
04-17-2011, 01:37 AM
I too use fishing line (4lb test) to tie my plants to stuff. After a few days it's tough to see unless you know where to look.

Lady Hobbs
04-17-2011, 02:09 AM
I think we're talking one or two staples here that we get rid of when the plant attaches. It's not like we're tossing in 10 pounds of hardware to rust. :)

I have also used push pins.

Brhino
04-17-2011, 02:11 AM
super glue gel!

mermaidwannabe
04-17-2011, 05:21 AM
I would be concerned about the sharp ends of the staple -- I would want to be sure that both ends embedded securely into the driftwood so the staple couldn't be dislodged by foraging fish that could then swallow it or get pierced by its sharp ends if it came out. I could see a staple potentially injuring a fish. Not worth the gamble, in my opinion.

Isn't it also possible that a fish could be cut or scraped by fishing line if it brushed against it or swam into it? I would think it would be difficult for even a fish with good eyesight to see it, and many fish have poor eyesight.

Glue would seem the better alternative, providing it's aquarium-safe glue.

-- mermaidwannabe

Alasse
04-17-2011, 06:32 AM
I use zip ties, i have varying sizes, dependant of what i'm tying to. Quick, simple to use & remove, non toxic, able to be used 1 handed.

Lady Hobbs
04-17-2011, 12:07 PM
I would be concerned about the sharp ends of the staple

Really? You would worry about the sharp edges of the staple that is buried in the wood? Then guess you would worry about the push pin, too?

I worried about string and my BN getting caught in string. I like the glue gel the best!

Dave66
04-17-2011, 12:56 PM
Hobbsy, when rhizomes are tied on wood (i use black cotton thread), they are tied quite snugly. Tight enough to keep flush contact with the wood. It'd be well nigh impossible for your bristlenose to get caught in it. They never have in my tanks. No space for them to get under the thread.

Dave

Rue
04-17-2011, 01:43 PM
If rust is an issue and this is fresh water, stainless steel staples will work fine - the point about a closed system is correct for many people since water changes are rare. Then a large bit of rusting iron can cause toxic levels to be reached (# One poison of children is - Iron. Many children's (read VERY sweet) vitamins that contain iron can be deadly and those should NEVER be kept on hand with young children - just not worth the danger.)

I hope you're not equating one rusting staple in an aquarium to a small child ODing on vitamins...

And yes...if we're going to start to pick and choose scenarios...we can certainly pick and chose ones that will result in a toxic situation.

mermaidwannabe
04-17-2011, 02:26 PM
I wouldn't be concerned about a staple or push pin if I knew it would stay embedded in whatever I embedded it into. I would be concerned about it getting dislodged by a foraging or actively rambunctous fish. It wouldn't be problem if it stayed put, but if it came out, then it could cause injury, especially if a fish swallowed it.

That why I would prefer an aquarium-safe glue ...

-- mermaid

Lady Hobbs
04-17-2011, 03:27 PM
LOL Hope that fish carries around a screwdriver and pliers with him. It's the only way I can remove them. I agree on the glue.

Abbeys_Mom
04-17-2011, 07:22 PM
I tried glue, but a darn gourami broke out a bottle of nail polish remover and dissolved the glue!

LOL

Rue
04-17-2011, 07:48 PM
Those gouramis are so girly...sheesh...