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Reefkeeper18
11-04-2010, 06:54 PM
what would be a good peaceful anemone my O-clown pair would accept as a host? What would be a good addition to my tank. its 35gs and i already have two scooter blennies a pair of O-clowns a feather fuster a cleaner shrimp and five american star shells. Looking to add something more active and colorful to the tank. Also taking suggestions for coral frags which are rarer without being extremely expensive.(which would work with metal halide):ssuprised:

funkman262
11-04-2010, 06:57 PM
Is there a such thing as a peaceful anemone? I thought any of them will try to consume any fish that comes within reach. Also, when choosing an anemone, consider that not all types of clownfish will host all types of anemones. Some are very picky so you need to see what your options are first.

Reefkeeper18
11-04-2010, 06:59 PM
not ALL anemones eat fish ex blennies gobys etc but some do. just looking for one that is less likely

funkman262
11-04-2010, 07:02 PM
Oh ok. When you say O-clown, are you referring to oscellaris? And is it tank bred or wild? If it's tank raised, it may not even host any anemone. In fact, if it does host anything, it might be another coral or even a powerhead. If it's wild, then you're restricted to certain types of anemones.

Reefkeeper18
11-04-2010, 07:04 PM
tank bred. yea heard a lot that its either hit or miss... either way an anemone is a nice addition to any tank.

ILuvMyGoldBarb
11-05-2010, 12:12 AM
First thing, what are your nitrate levels like? Anemones are very picky and do not tolerate poor water quality at all.
Second, let's correct a previous statement, not all anemones will accept a clown as a host, but all species of clownfish will host in an anemone. The issue is that some specimens will not host in captivity. Also, just because they are wild it does not mean you are restricted on anemone type. One of the more popular anemones for reef keepers to keep is the Bubble-tip Anemone, and it also seems to be the anemone that clowns in captivity take to most readily. The irony is that in the wild, Ocellaris clowns don't host in Bubble-tips, but in captivity they will.

Clowns will often host in things other than an anemone. I have see them host in Algae, Leathers, Mushrooms, LPS, and anemones. I've also seen them just pick a hollow in the rock to "host" in.

MCHRKiller
11-05-2010, 12:24 AM
Then you have some crazy captive bred ones which look at you like your stupid when you expect them to host in something. My pair of black ocellaris host in nothing they are instead out in the open 24/7.

Reefkeeper18
11-05-2010, 01:30 AM
nitrate for the most part is constantly at 10ppm i change around 10% of water weekly. also test a lot and make sure everything is stable. I was looking into a BTA but heard some ocellaris dont accept them as a host

labnjab
11-05-2010, 04:41 AM
Our tank raised ocellaris love all 4 of their BTA's. The rarely leave them except for dinner time or to bite me,

Getting them to host is hit or miss, some take several weeks before they will host a nem and some won't host at all.

When we 1st added our BTA (back when we had a 29 gallon) it took the female 2 weeks before she hosted and the male wouldn't host for another week or 2. Our female died a year later and we immediately replaced her, and the new one was hosting in under 2 hours.

Make sure your tank is running 6 months or more and is stable before adding a nem and make sure you have the appropriate lighting too.

ILuvMyGoldBarb
11-05-2010, 10:48 AM
10ppm of nitrate is too high for an anemone. They need it at 2-3ppm.

labnjab
11-05-2010, 11:20 AM
nitrate for the most part is constantly at 10ppm i change around 10% of water weekly. also test a lot and make sure everything is stable. I was looking into a BTA but heard some ocellaris dont accept them as a host


Are you running any type of bio-filter besides your live rock, like bio-balls, bio-wheels, filter pads or anything else? If so removing them completely or at least cleaning them every few days in hot tap water will cause a good drop in nitrate. Unlike freshwater, in a reef you really want your nitrates as close to 0 as possible, preferably 0.