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View Full Version : Ideal pH for a betta?



AdrienDeLaChicago
05-28-2010, 08:05 AM
Hey there. I am thinking of creating a DIY carbon dioxide kit with brewer's yeast and sugar. I will have this set up for a small 6.6 tank. I have a lot of plants and want to ensure healthy plants. But I don't want the pH levels to drop dangerously low. I have pH testing strips. My questions are:

1) Are there any products you can recommend to control the pH? Is it in liquid form? Recommended brand?

2) What is a healthy pH for a betta? My water is a tad alkaline at this point and is around 8. My water is hard also.

Hope to get some great pointers from you fine people. :)

rich311k
05-28-2010, 10:36 AM
I beleive you said you had hard water, so nothing to worry about. The PH change from CO2 injection is of little effect on a fish. It takes a change in disolved solids to effect the fish and CO2 will not change that. The danger from CO2 comes from to much being put into the water, once levels get above 50ppm things can start getting hairy for our fishy friends. It is hard to overdose CO2 with DIY but it is possible especuially in a small tank so be aware of any changes in the fish's behavior.

gm72
05-28-2010, 10:48 AM
pH stability, not the actual number, is usually the most important value for fish. They are usually very adaptable but don't handle wide pH swings well. So, if your pH is stable at that level you'll be just fine. The betta will adapt, just acclimate well and for that consider drip acclimation or at least a prolonged acclimation to ease him into the new conditions.

AdrienDeLaChicago
05-28-2010, 09:58 PM
Thanks, guys. Hey what is drip acclimation? I have idea what you mean by that.

I read somewhere that CO2 injection could lower the pH to 3 which is the same acidity as vinegar! I got the impression that this was too acidic for fish.

Northernguy
05-28-2010, 10:05 PM
Stable ph is always best.If you bought the fish locally there is a good chance that you and the lfs have the same ph and water supply,unless you are on a well.
Keeping the same ph as what is suggested best for your fish is most important when you have wild caught fish.
Not sure what the co2 will do to your ph.3 is way too low!lol
6 is very acidic.3 is acid!

This is how to drip acclimate.
http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aquariumforum/showthread.php?t=62211

rich311k
05-28-2010, 10:47 PM
Thanks, guys. Hey what is drip acclimation? I have idea what you mean by that.

I read somewhere that CO2 injection could lower the pH to 3 which is the same acidity as vinegar! I got the impression that this was too acidic for fish.

I do not think carbolic acid will go that low. You could get CO2 well over 100ppm if you pump it in. You could make soda in your tank if you had the CO2 to burn. That will not happen. High CO2 levels would kill the fish long before the PH got to dangerous levels.

AdrienDeLaChicago
05-28-2010, 11:21 PM
Okay, I thought that CO2 would raise pH levels and that I would need to watch out for any problems as a result. I will give it a try and report back any problems , if they are any.

korith
05-29-2010, 01:29 AM
The wildturkey wrote up an nice diy about drip acclimating in http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aquariumforum/showthread.php?t=39559

So let's say you bought a fish at the lfs, and you brought it home. The fish has to adapt from the lfs water to yours. The idea is to do this slowly by drip acclimating. Too large of a change in water conditions done quickly, can be a shock to the fish and can cause them to die. Invertebrates like shrimp are very sensitive to changes in water conditions if done too quickly.

I have a 10g planted tank with a co2, the only occupant is a crowntail betta. He's doing well enough. Just remember to have some sort of water agitation happening during the night.

AdrienDeLaChicago
05-29-2010, 06:22 PM
I did a search on youtube and was able to find a demonstration of the drip acclimation. I get how this works now.

But if I were to start my own DIY carbon dioxide with brewer's yeast and sugar and the pH gradually went up I believe it would be the same gradual adjustment for the fish. This is, of course, assuming that the pH doesn't get out of control. I will be watching it closely when I do decide to do this.

Thanks for your help. thumbs2: