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Piscine
04-13-2010, 01:50 PM
Yesterday, my boss went and collected he bait traps. He runs trot lines and uses bream for bait. I saw all of the fish in the ice chest and decided to rescue one.

So I now have a ~6" bluegill. I drip acclimated over a period of 4 hours, and the fish has been doing great as far as I know. He does have what appears to be some type of fin-rot, but it could just be from fighting.

My question is....What should I be trying to feed it? I know it probably will not readily accept any foods that I have, but I can get crickets and feeders if I need to.

I'd like to try to reproduce what it eats in nature, as I may introduce it back into the wild someday, depending on the fish's behavior over the next few days.

Brhino
04-13-2010, 01:54 PM
they're meat eaters, so go with live food if you can. worms, crickets, that kind of thing.

hockeyhead019
04-13-2010, 02:11 PM
use any type of ear worms or crickets

terrapin24h
04-13-2010, 02:38 PM
i know *for a fact* that bluegill will eat pepperoni. :hmm3grin2orange:

What size tank are you keepin him in? IIRC they get quite large(like oscar large) so i you'll need a big tank. Plus, i think they are pretty predatory fish, so careful with his tank mates.

--chris

Piscine
04-13-2010, 03:09 PM
As of now, he/she is in my 55g with all other fish removed except a few convict fry. I'm sure he has eaten the convict fry by now.

UncleWillie
04-13-2010, 05:10 PM
I may introduce it back into the wild someday, depending on the fish's behavior over the next few days.

No, No, No and No.


As to what you are wanting to feed, yes, crickets and worms will be great for the time being. It will associate you with food, then you can try converting it to pellets. The only problem is that you have an adult fish which are harder to convert to prepared foods. Bluegill are very easy to train to frozen, then freeze-dried, but age is an issue.

They are not demanding and are very tough animals. Just make sure you can provide the right home for him. Otherwise, give him to your friend for bait. But DO NOT release him.

Piscine
04-13-2010, 05:17 PM
No, No, No and No.




I hear you, but could you provide some reasoning behind the "do not release" advice? Right now, all I have is your opinion, but I need facts to back it up. A simple "no" is a waste of bandwidth. lol

I appreciate your advice!

Brhino
04-13-2010, 05:20 PM
even though he's a native fish, having him in a setup with some non-native fish (and leftovers such as the substrate and filter media) introduces the possibility of releasing a potentially devastating non-native disease into the environment if he picks one up while in your care.

terrapin24h
04-13-2010, 05:34 PM
even though he's a native fish, having him in a setup with some non-native fish (and leftovers such as the substrate and filter media) introduces the possibility of releasing a potentially devastating non-native disease into the environment if he picks one up while in your care.

here here! Also keep in mind the reverse is true for any fish you put in with him from your existing tank(s) If you were to put a fish in with him fro another tank, and then move that fish back to the orginial tank it came from, you've now exposed *that* tank to all the wild diseases the bluegill may have carried. Kind of a "typhoid mary" scenario.

--chris

toddnbecka
04-13-2010, 05:38 PM
You can feed bluegills the same diet as cichlids. They'll generally eat anything you drop in the tank.

Piscine
04-13-2010, 05:41 PM
I gotcha! thumbs2:

If we used him for bait he would be releasing his non-native disease into the Red River, and that's a big deal. I don't know if you have ever done trot lines, but the bait fish get a hook through their back while they are still alive. This is so they will swim long enough for a very large catfish to swim by, see them, and eat them (and the hook). :ssuprised:

So basically if he doesn't work out, I'll have to either take him to the LFS or cull him. :scry:

Piscine
04-13-2010, 05:46 PM
here here! Also keep in mind the reverse is true for any fish you put in with him from your existing tank(s) If you were to put a fish in with him fro another tank, and then move that fish back to the orginial tank it came from, you've now exposed *that* tank to all the wild diseases the bluegill may have carried. Kind of a "typhoid mary" scenario.

--chris


Yeah, I'm inclined to believe that he has some type of fin ailment. Either that, or he just tried entirely too hard to get out of the trap. His fins look a little rough, which is why I removed the convicts. They'll be going to a new home this evening.

Wild Turkey
04-13-2010, 05:47 PM
So basically if he doesn't work out, I'll have to either take him to the LFS or cull him. :scry:

Yes, unfortunately. You have it right it could turn out to be a very big deal and its a big time hobby no-no so to speak.

Im pretty sure no one gives a hoot about a bluegill (lol), but in the future you should check laws in your area before capturing any live fish as well.

Piscine
04-13-2010, 05:52 PM
I'll try to get pictures this evening if I can. He doesn't seem very shy until I get within a few feet of the tank. I imagine that he either can't see well, or he was just trying to figure out what I am. He has been very calm throughout the whole transition. No clenched fins or heavy breathing.

terrapin24h
04-13-2010, 06:42 PM
I'll try to get pictures this evening if I can. He doesn't seem very shy until I get within a few feet of the tank. I imagine that he either can't see well, or he was just trying to figure out what I am. He has been very calm throughout the whole transition. No clenched fins or heavy breathing.

Look at it from his point of view. One day you're in the river, the next you're suspended in mid air with all this *really* weird looking stuff around, without any of your school-mates. I'm sure he sees perfectly well, hence why he freaks out when you get close to the tank. Feed him a little something everytime you get near the tank, that should help him bond to you. That's a wild animal you got there, and as such he'll be naturally fearful of humans

--chris

UncleWillie
04-13-2010, 07:22 PM
Brhino hit the nail on the head without going into the long talk I would have. Well put, Brhino.

Oh - another reason: it's illegal.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife of Fisheries Commission
"Releasing aquarium fishes or unused bait into state waters is illegal."
http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/fishing/recreational/freshwater/regulations/

Added: I shouldn't have wasted bandwidth. My apologies. (That usually bugs me as well) :)

Piscine
04-13-2010, 07:50 PM
Very good guys! I'm not trying to be a butt-head or anything, but when I search through old threads to find information, I often find my exact question in a thread, often followed by a simple "yes" or "no" without an explanation. Then I either have to resurrect an old thread or make a new one asking the same old question.

If we as fish-keepers listened to every single thing we heard on the Internet without some sort of skepticism, we'd have a lot of fish living in wacky conditions! :22:

I found out that a petsmart in my area may be violating state law with some of the plants they sell (and some that they will let you have for free). I also found out that the Texas Cichlid (Rio Grande Cichlid) is a noxious species here and is illegal to posses (which makes sense, I hear they are very prolific and can produce a couple thousand eggs in one brood)... I had one for a while, but had no idea that I was harboring a fugitive.. :ssuprised:

HorrorShowRot
04-13-2010, 09:13 PM
I want pics of this bluegill. Wonder what kind of setup you got for em.

Piscine
04-13-2010, 09:19 PM
Yesa, master!

I gets doze pics fu ya as sune as i gets home.


lol j/k

I intend to take pictures this evening. It's only one fish, also.

HorrorShowRot
04-13-2010, 09:28 PM
And to be quite honest.... You my friend have peaked my interest. My buddy has private access to a lake upnorth I might do a large 300gallon natural biotype of it... Might even try for a bigger tank:) What ph do you keep the bluegill at?

Piscine
04-13-2010, 09:38 PM
PH was 7.6 or 7.8 this past weekend, but I have had this fish for less than 24 hours. It was trapped just yesterday. It seems that the fish trapped in the pond are in much worse shape than specimens trapped in the river. The pond thrives though. I could probably get you the ph of the pond water as well.

From what I understand, any type of bream will pretty much thrive in whatever conditions you place it in(to a point)... Still, That is no excuse not to attempt to consistently mimic the natural habitat of the fish in question, though.

HorrorShowRot
04-13-2010, 09:40 PM
Well I would love to see how this project turns out:D So hurry up and get home:P

Mith
04-13-2010, 09:49 PM
Yes, unfortunately. You have it right it could turn out to be a very big deal and its a big time hobby no-no so to speak.

Im pretty sure no one gives a hoot about a bluegill (lol), but in the future you should check laws in your area before capturing any live fish as well.



In California, its illegal to transport a live fish from a lake.

Piscine
04-13-2010, 09:56 PM
Cali has a bunch of silly rules. lol

It's not illegal to take a bream, but certain fish can land you in the federal penitentiary.

troy
04-13-2010, 10:56 PM
No, No, No and No.


As to what you are wanting to feed, yes, crickets and worms will be great for the time being. It will associate you with food, then you can try converting it to pellets. The only problem is that you have an adult fish which are harder to convert to prepared foods. Bluegill are very easy to train to frozen, then freeze-dried, but age is an issue.

They are not demanding and are very tough animals. Just make sure you can provide the right home for him. Otherwise, give him to your friend for bait. But DO NOT release him.
If the bluegill was used as bait it could still introduce pathogens to the body of water.

Piscine
04-14-2010, 02:08 PM
Unfortunately, no pictures today. I had to take one of the work trucks to auction last night because the guy that was supposed to take it flaked out on me. I ended up getting home just before 11, and was pooped to say the least.

Piscine
04-14-2010, 02:11 PM
I might try to get some gator pics for everyone too. I found a spot where they like to lay out on the river. As long as you keep a good 5-10ft away, they aren't shy at all. I suppose they think they are camouflaged. There won't be any action shots though. lolol I'm no croc hunter. In fact, I just recently saw my first one up close, and it was at this spot. They usually have part of their tail in the water, so I can't really tell exactly how long they are. Every time I have been by there since then there is at least one 6-8ft gator, but I have seen one floating in the water that had to be at least 10-12ft. I assume that's momma, and I'll be staying far away from that one and watching my back.

The rule of thumb I have always heard is to estimate the distance between the eyeball and the snout in inches, and thats how many feet long they usually are.

Piscine
04-16-2010, 03:57 PM
I had to cull him last night.

I tried to feed him some cricket and he ate one. He then proceeded to erratically swim into the lid. He was pretty much beating himself to death.

fish00053
04-16-2010, 09:29 PM
Unfortunate as it may sound I recently went to my son-in-laws for dinner and to my surprise they had fish that he caught Ice Fishing. Bluegills,Crappie, and a few Walleye. I once put a bluegill in a small goldfish bowl and within 10 minutes the goldfish disappeared. Good Luck!!! You can also feed them store bought maggots or meal worms. Excellent bait for catching them so why not feed it to him.