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Neon
04-09-2010, 03:24 PM
hello everyone !:ssmile:

has anyone had problems with adding some tonic salt ?

I noticed that some of my plants (amazon swords ) are loosing their leaves, leaves which look like perfectly healty and spotless, so I am just supposing that is the salt ...also my assasin snail died. Fish:fish: are all in top, brilliant:fish: form and over-breeding.....


I'm going to riduce or eliminate the adding of tonic salt for a while.

thank you

jimw/oscar
04-09-2010, 05:00 PM
hello everyone !:ssmile:

has anyone had problems with adding some tonic salt ?

I noticed that some of my plants (amazon swords ) are loosing their leaves, leaves which look like perfectly healty and spotless, so I am just supposing that is the salt ...also my assasin snail died. Fish:fish: are all in top, brilliant:fish: form and over-breeding.....


I'm going to riduce or eliminate the adding of tonic salt for a while.

thank you


Yeah salt definitely is bad for freshwater plants and snails. Never heard of mean little boys pouring salt on snails or slugs? The Romans used to sew salt into the fields of their enemies to destroy their crops. It's one of the reasons Noah's Flood couldn't be a true story, the salt water from the oceans would have destroyed all the top soil making the recovery of freshwater crops impossible - at least for many hundreds or even thousands of years.

Dacotah7
04-10-2010, 06:17 AM
hello everyone !:ssmile:

has anyone had problems with adding some tonic salt ?

I noticed that some of my plants (amazon swords ) are loosing their leaves, leaves which look like perfectly healty and spotless, so I am just supposing that is the salt ...also my assasin snail died. Fish:fish: are all in top, brilliant:fish: form and over-breeding.....


I'm going to riduce or eliminate the adding of tonic salt for a while.

thank you

Yes. I think you are on-track; something is causing the problems so changes are in order and eliminating the salt seems logical.

You may find this post interesting: http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aquariumforum/showthread.php?t=31554


Yeah salt definitely is bad for freshwater plants and snails. Never heard of mean little boys pouring salt on snails or slugs? The Romans used to sew salt into the fields of their enemies to destroy their crops. It's one of the reasons Noah's Flood couldn't be a true story, the salt water from the oceans would have destroyed all the top soil making the recovery of freshwater crops impossible - at least for many hundreds or even thousands of years.

This probably is not the place to discuss if the story is true, so I will not but your reason is flawed. You may find the History Channels' "How the Earth Was Made" series of interest. That is exactly what happened. Various portions of the earth, now mountains or prime farmland were under the ocean, some several times in history. Just a few examples are the Colorado Plateau, the Dakota Formation and the Cretaceous Seaway. The evidence is the fossilized remains of marine life found in some very strange or seemingling unusal places and begs the questions, "how did so many (fossils) get where they ended up?". Yes it did take a very, very long time.

jimw/oscar
04-10-2010, 01:39 PM
Yes. I think you are on-track; something is causing the problems so changes are in order and eliminating the salt seems logical.

Yeah, there are plenty of threads on virtually every forum discussing the whys of not using salt in freshwater aquariums. They've got me convinced.



This probably is not the place to discuss if the story is true, so I will not but your reason is flawed. You may find the History Channels' "How the Earth Was Made" series of interest. That is exactly what happened. Various portions of the earth, now mountains or prime farmland were under the ocean, some several times in history. Just a few examples are the Colorado Plateau, the Dakota Formation and the Cretaceous Seaway. The evidence is the fossilized remains of marine life found in some very strange or seemingling unusal places and begs the questions, "how did so many (fossils) get where they ended up?". Yes it did take a very, very long time.

LOL, yeah probably off topic a tad; but those areas were ocean floor scores to hundreds of million years ago (in Earth's natural history not within human history by a long shot) and were pushed up by well established and understood tectonic actions. This is how mountain ranges form and why we never find fossils of modern marine life forms in these layers, because they are too old. The topsoil layers around the world were not damaged by glacial advances and contractions since glaciers are fresh water.

I'm honestly not sure how long it would take for soil to recover from a saline inundation but Earth's topsoil never had to, having been laid down millions of years after the land rose from the ocean floor.