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Cliff
04-01-2010, 01:44 AM
I have some clumps of java fern tied to drift wood that has a lot of algae on them. I want to wash it off. I remembered reading a thread about that but I canít find it right now. I canít remember if you wash it off with a 10% solution of bleach or hydrogen peroxide?

From what I remember these are the steps:
-Remove the plant from the tank and place in the solution
-Wash the plant in the solution for no more than a few minutes
-Wash the plant again in declorinated water
-Return to tank

Did I remember correctly ?

toysrus
04-01-2010, 04:11 AM
I'll bite on this one lol...
I believe it's peroxide not bleeeech.
Sometimes it just won't remove itself no matter what you try.
Mine [algae] is re-incarnating itself as we speak.
I heard it was supposed to kill snail larve too!
I use a soft tooth brush for a scrubber.

I have some clumps of java fern tied to drift wood that has a lot of algae on them. I want to wash it off. I remembered reading a thread about that but I canít find it right now. I canít remember if you wash it off with a 10% solution of bleach or hydrogen peroxide?

From what I remember these are the steps:
-Remove the plant from the tank and place in the solution
-Wash the plant in the solution for no more than a few minutes
-Wash the plant again in declorinated water
-Return to tank

Did I remember correctly ?

Zilla
04-01-2010, 10:54 AM
Variety is the spice of life, but sometimes too much info is bad and the outcome isn't always good regardless of good intentions.

Both methods can be used, however, I'm not sure how well Java Ferns stand up to such treatment.

Bleach- 1 part bleach to 19 parts water.

I used this method on a Amazon Sword and the Sword didn't like it much. The leaves didn't turn white as I only left them in for less than a minute and soaked them in dechlorinated water for over a hour, but the plant still took a hit and looks rather pathetic right now. It's still alive, but blech. It looks lke crap and now needs a major trimming.

Different people use the peroxide method in different ways, Some soak, others squirt it on the plant. Either way, don't allow to either soak in too long or leave it sitting on the leaves for any length of time.

To make things further confusing, there is also the Excel method. Using full strength Excel on a plant can and will kill it in some cases. ( I can't see past the irony. A plant fert that can kill a plant on contact... *shakes head*) So, if you'd like to gamble with this method, use a syringe ( can find them in them in the cat / dog dewromer section of stores like Pet Smart) or turkey baster and mix up a ratio half Excel, half water. Apply to problem leaves and rinse.

If this is residual algae from the problem you were having, you should start to see a die off rather quickly. If it's BBA algae, it may take awhile.

If you want to try just taking the plant out and manually rubbing the algae off, that may or may not work.

Cliff
04-01-2010, 12:57 PM
Variety is the spice of life, but sometimes too much info is bad and the outcome isn't always good regardless of good intentions.

Both methods can be used, however, I'm not sure how well Java Ferns stand up to such treatment.

Bleach- 1 part bleach to 19 parts water.

I used this method on a Amazon Sword and the Sword didn't like it much. The leaves didn't turn white as I only left them in for less than a minute and soaked them in dechlorinated water for over a hour, but the plant still took a hit and looks rather pathetic right now. It's still alive, but blech. It looks lke crap and now needs a major trimming.

Different people use the peroxide method in different ways, Some soak, others squirt it on the plant. Either way, don't allow to either soak in too long or leave it sitting on the leaves for any length of time.

To make things further confusing, there is also the Excel method. Using full strength Excel on a plant can and will kill it in some cases. ( I can't see past the irony. A plant fert that can kill a plant on contact... *shakes head*) So, if you'd like to gamble with this method, use a syringe ( can find them in them in the cat / dog dewromer section of stores like Pet Smart) or turkey baster and mix up a ratio half Excel, half water. Apply to problem leaves and rinse.

If this is residual algae from the problem you were having, you should start to see a die off rather quickly. If it's BBA algae, it may take awhile.

If you want to try just taking the plant out and manually rubbing the algae off, that may or may not work.

Yup, this is the residual algae in my 36 gallon tank. Its starting to die off rapidly now that I have reduced the lighting and lowered the nitrates. I tested for phosphates which barely even registered on my test kit. I am concerned the dying algae could result in a small ammonia spike. I am currently completing 50% water changes every other day, but the next two weeks Iíll be out of town and I donít think my wife will have the time for all those water changes. I want to remove all the algae I could this week end to make sure.

I read about the excel method, but I'm really not that comfortable using any type chemical unless I have no other option. Heck, I canít even bring myself to use a full dose of ferts in my 55 gallon tank, most Iíve ever used was a 50% dose twice per month. I too found to be rather ironic that you could use a full strenght fert to kill a plant or algae.

If Java fern can be sensitive, Iíll just was off in declorinated water. That should get enough of it. If that doesnít work, Iíll try the bleach method

Thanks for the info, very helpful. thumbs2: thumbs2: thumbs2:

Zilla
04-01-2010, 01:05 PM
Since it's dying off on it's own, I wouldn't do anything. Java Fern leaves are like mosses in the sense that they seem to collect everything. I have 1 in the 20 gallon and 1 in the 55 and both of them always have something stuck on them.

I found that just rubbing them off with alittle pressure, (not too much as it will hurt the leaves) does the trick.

I don't full dose with ferts either. I half dose with water changes only. For heavy root feeders such as Swords, they get a root tab once a month.

Keep a eye on things and see how it goes. Your plants will tell you if you are doing the right thing. Also as suggested in your other thread, if you haven't done so already, get some fast growers in there. They are nature's vacuum cleaners. LOL

Plant Man
04-06-2010, 07:17 PM
Use Excel by it's directions for a week and most of your algea will be gone.

Cliff
04-07-2010, 12:52 AM
Use Excel by it's directions for a week and most of your algea will be gone.

I never would have thought of that !!!

I'll give it a shot once all of my fry are out of that tank

thx

Zilla
04-07-2010, 01:02 AM
Before you do that, make sure you don't have plants that are sensitive to Excel as otherwise perfectly healthy plants can / will be rendered into brown mush.

It's one of the many issues with Excel that is talked about, but yet not talked about until somebody has a problem with it. What can kill algae can also kill plants. There's that funny logic..

Cliff
04-07-2010, 01:05 AM
Before you do that, make sure you don't have plants that are sensitive to Excel as otherwise perfectly healthy plants can / will be rendered into brown mush.


Thanks for that tip, I will to a little research first. After all, I've got some time. The algue keeps getting less and less so I'm one the right track.

Zilla
04-07-2010, 01:07 AM
Well there ya go. Why dose the tank when it's not needed?

Cliff
04-07-2010, 01:52 AM
Well there ya go. Why dose the tank when it's not needed?


Hmmmmm. Ya know, I like the way you think Zilla.

I guess I'll just take a good look in the tank when I move the fry out. Iím just too nervous to remove any plants or drift wood from the tank to clean off any algae right now as the fry is using this for cover. If that results in more algae growth, Iíll try it when the fry is out if the algae starts to come back. If not Iíll wait and see. If it continues to go away or a least will not get any worse. I guess I really should stay the couse for about week after the fry are moved.

Ever since I've been keeping the nitrate as close to zero as possible (to remove algae's food), I've been thinking about adding a 1/2 dose every other week for the plants. Just a little concerned they are not getting what they need, but so far no change in the plants so I haven't started that yet. But here's where I'm on the fence. I want to use ferts, but I don't want to use ferts. I know, I know, but it makes sense to me. I've never used a full dose of ferts for at least a few years. I was using 1/2 doses on my 55 for about a month but stopped to see what would happen, and nothing changed. I used to use ferts all the time until a few years ago when I accidently over did it and killed off almost all of the plants. Just a little paranoid about a repeat event as I'm starting to understand more of the potential impact that can have on a tank and all my guys in it.

But when the rubber hits the road, all that won't matter though. If I've removed the root cause of the algae, no excel is needed and life goes on. If not, back to the drawing board to try to find out what's causing the algae and address that cause and see what happens. Life goes on. Come to think of it, I think you even suggested I do exactly that before. (blush)

I'm not the sharpest tool in the shed some days :hmm3grin2orange: