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View Full Version : What coral for a beginner?



EmmanuelJB
03-10-2010, 12:28 AM
When my tank is set up and cycled I want to start off with 1 or 2 corals and I was wondering what you thought for some easy to take care of, nice looking, and common corals would be for me to try. Any suggestions?

Tigerbarb
03-10-2010, 01:00 AM
I'd recommend Zoanthids, for starters. They're very colorful, affordable, and hardy. Kenya Trees are also nice, as they aren't very hard to grow.

EmmanuelJB
03-10-2010, 01:25 AM
I'd recommend Zoanthids, for starters. They're very colorful, affordable, and hardy. Kenya Trees are also nice, as they aren't very hard to grow.
Ok I will probably start with one of the 2. I was looking at corals on live aquaria and I really liked the mushrooms. Would those be somthing to start with?

Amazon
03-10-2010, 01:34 AM
mushrooms are even hardier than zoanthids imo. The hardiest thing out there is xenia and kenya tree though. They reproduce faster than rabbits!

EmmanuelJB
03-10-2010, 01:46 AM
mushrooms are even hardier than zoanthids imo. The hardiest thing out there is xenia and kenya tree though. They reproduce faster than rabbits!
I dont really want anything thats going to take over my tank either...

EmmanuelJB
03-10-2010, 01:58 AM
I really like the white pom pom xenia. Since they reproduce rapidly can they be cut back or somthing? So I will probably start off with some type of mushroom coral and xenia.

Also I like frogspawn, would I be able to keep this in a corner or somthing eventually?

sheamurai
03-10-2010, 03:18 AM
My tank is still pretty new (10 weeks), and I've had a frogspawn for 2 months now, and its been doing fine. So long as you have enough light for it, it seems to be pretty hardy.

EmmanuelJB
03-10-2010, 03:24 AM
My tank is still pretty new (10 weeks), and I've had a frogspawn for 2 months now, and its been doing fine. So long as you have enough light for it, it seems to be pretty hardy.
Well the main thing I was concerned about the frogspawn was that it tends to be agressive towards other corals and extends fairly far out.

sheamurai
03-10-2010, 03:47 AM
mine hasn't extended too much so far, but my tank is pretty bare, plus I have a pair of clownfish hosting in it, which seems to keep it retracted a bit.

labnjab
03-10-2010, 12:20 PM
I've had some frogspawn for a year and a half and have yet to have an aggression problems with it. Its been within a few inches of other coral and it has never bothered anything. If you keep it in a corner you should be good, just keep an eye on the coral around it, if they start to retract it may be attacking them. Zoas are really nice and colorful additions

Keep in mind with frogspawn and other lps your going to need to make sure your calcium is around 400 and alk 8-9.

Xenia can be cut back pretty easily. I've peeled it off the rock before. Its one of those coral that for some people it grows like weeds and others it hardly grows at all. For me it doesn't grow very fast, in fact, most softies don't grow fast for me, yet sps grows like weeds. We keep our nutrients down very low with heavy skimming and lots of GFO and I think that is the main reason.

I've found if you keep nutrients down, the growth of softies is significantly slower then if you had more nutrients


mine hasn't extended too much so far, but my tank is pretty bare, plus I have a pair of clownfish hosting in it, which seems to keep it retracted a bit. Be very careful with a clown hosting any LPS, I've know people who have had very nice lps coral killed by clownfish hosting them

EmmanuelJB
03-10-2010, 08:34 PM
Ok, thanks! Can I just use regular Oceanic salt for the tank with corals? Also what suppluments do I have to add to the tank for the corals?

Tigerbarb
03-12-2010, 12:29 AM
Although some hobbyists may disagree, I think it's fine to use regular Oceanic salt in a reef tank. Adding supplements isn't mandatory for all corals, as they will often be fine feeding off of iodine and trace elements in the water. If you plan to feed them, I would recommend Frozen Cyclops.

EmmanuelJB
03-12-2010, 01:47 AM
Well im going to be using deionized water which will take out alot of the trace elements, then what the salt puts back in I will also have a skimmer which will take some out. So do these factors effect anything?

kaybee
03-12-2010, 03:47 AM
If by deionized water you mean RO/DI water, then all trace elements are removed, not just "a lot". Fortunately the salt mix should provide everything the corals need (as determined by appropriate test kits).

The essential and trace elements in the salt mix you use should be more than enough for corals unless their consumption rate exceeds replenishment rate (elements are replenished during water changes).

Trace elements are also introduced into the tank through any feeding you may provide as well as from fish waste. The protein skimmer may take out some trace elements but won't strip the water bare of them.

RO/DI water + protein skimmer shouldn't be much of an issue.

EmmanuelJB
03-12-2010, 03:52 AM
If by deionized water you mean RO/DI water, then all trace elements are removed, not just "a lot". Fortunately the salt mix should provide everything the corals need (as determined by appropriate test kits).

The essential and trace elements in the salt mix you use should be more than enough for corals unless their consumption rate exceeds replenishment rate (elements are replenished during water changes).

Trace elements are also introduced into the tank through any feeding you may provide as well as from fish waste. The protein skimmer may take out some trace elements but won't strip the water bare of them.

RO/DI water + protein skimmer shouldn't be much of an issue.

Its just deionized water no, RO. And I was going to say all trace elements, but I want 100% sure so I just said alot.