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PatsCats
10-01-2009, 05:00 PM
I've kept fish for over 20 years, and I'm tired of the standard 10-20 gallon tanks. In the past this has been a financial issue, but now I can finally afford the upgrade and the upkeep.

Right now I have an approximately 25 gallon hex (which I hate! Pretty, but not practical!), and I'm thinking of upgrading to a 46 or 72 gallon (can't seem to find a 55).

In my research I'm finding that some larger aquariums have the filter built into the tank, "with no external plumbing." I've always appreciated the convenience of an outside filter, especially when changing the filter medium. What is the difference, to the fish and the aquarium environment, between outside filtration and inside filtration? Is it a matter of personal preference, or is one better over the other for the fish? Or am I completely misinterpreting the meaning of a built-in filter?

Also, why do many of the larger tanks (especially bowfronts) already have a blue or black background?

Thanx a lot!
Patricia

Rue
10-01-2009, 06:24 PM
Built in filter? I'm not sure what you mean. Is there a link?

I have a 55g...but I wish I had a 75. Same height...a bit wider. I think the width would be ideal.

Toomany Tanks
10-02-2009, 07:43 AM
I've kept fish for over 20 years, and I'm tired of the standard 10-20 gallon tanks. In the past this has been a financial issue, but now I can finally afford the upgrade and the upkeep.

Right now I have an approximately 25 gallon hex (which I hate! Pretty, but not practical!), and I'm thinking of upgrading to a 46 or 72 gallon (can't seem to find a 55).

In my research I'm finding that some larger aquariums have the filter built into the tank, "with no external plumbing." I've always appreciated the convenience of an outside filter, especially when changing the filter medium. What is the difference, to the fish and the aquarium environment, between outside filtration and inside filtration? Is it a matter of personal preference, or is one better over the other for the fish? Or am I completely misinterpreting the meaning of a built-in filter?

Also, why do many of the larger tanks (especially bowfronts) already have a blue or black background?

Thanx a lot!
Patricia

Might I suggest patience and let local used sales be your guide to your next tank. I just saw a guy buy a 120 gallon tank, stand and hood for fifty bucks today. Boy was I jealous. I just missed the transaction. I would have paid the original asking price of 75 bucks.

Being an over stocker, I prefer over filtration. I do this by way of keeping every filter type I have in use and only take one off line at a time to service.

fins_n_fur
10-02-2009, 07:53 AM
It probably doesn't make a huge difference to the fish or water if you have internal filtration. I would prefer to have HOB or a canister filter over an internal filter.

1. Internals may be limited to what sort of media could be used
2. They take up real estate in the tank that could be used for fish or plants
3. They can look ugly, although I have one in a small tank that I don't mind, as long as I get my plants growing to hide it.

HOB's or Canisters give you much more flexibility and can allow a higher stocking of fish than what you might do with an internal filter.

2xtheman
10-22-2009, 07:16 AM
In my opinion, external filtration is better.
1) they increase the volume of water the tank holds (especially with sump filtration). That makes water quality fluctuations less noticeable.
2) they are easier to access and maintain
3) they are usually much easier to find replacement parts than oddball internal filter units.

And like fins_n_fur said, internal filtration can look unpleasant and take up valuable space. Less space = less fish!

tetra
11-13-2009, 02:39 PM
Keep looking, I bought what was told is a 50 gallon but ended up being a 60 with stand and fish for 50 bucks used. Most of the fish is gone to the local fish store to get some silcone to reseal the tank. I also picked up a brand new fluval 504 for 50 bucks at the same store.

So i am in to my tank for about 100 bucks so far.

Deleted User
11-13-2009, 03:14 PM
This isn't part of your question, but I'm sitting here trying to prepare for bigger tanks. When we started, this summer, I had no idea how much we'd love the fish and how many different incompatible types we would want to keep.

That said, if you can, start running some additional biomedia in your filter to seed for your upgrade. I've got tanks sitting here basically waiting on our other, smaller tanks to seed some media to instantly cycle one new tank at a time.

If possible, maybe look into preformed ReeFresH2O (formerly known as Cell Pore) cartridges or Super Cartridges. They have a lot of surface area to grow / house the good bacteria you need in a tank and can help you jump start / instantly cycle your new tank. Depending on who you ask, it takes 2-4wks for the good bacteria to become established on the filter media of an established tank.

Good luck!!!

PS I agree, start checking Craigslist -- you may find an awesome deal that way!... My searches have lead to an unanticipated result, which is the pending adoption of a new cat -- go figure!!!

Northernguy
11-13-2009, 05:46 PM
If you are looking at a 4ft tank try and find a deal on a 75gal.They are a great size for many different fish.
I agree with an HOB and a canister filter.
I poersonally like the Rena xp3 for a canister and an ac 110 as an HOB.You will have no problems with whatever fish you like from a guppy to an oscar!
You can find great deals on Craig's list.It never hurts to save several hundred dollars.thumbs2:

MonkeyPox
11-13-2009, 06:01 PM
In my opinion, external filtration is better.
1) they increase the volume of water the tank holds (especially with sump filtration). That makes water quality fluctuations less noticeable.
2) they are easier to access and maintain
3) they are usually much easier to find replacement parts than oddball internal filter units.

And like fins_n_fur said, internal filtration can look unpleasant and take up valuable space. Less space = less fish!


I agree with this. Some excellent advice.