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panther
08-29-2009, 09:06 AM
can anyone tell the difference sexes between male and female blue malawi, why do some have more egg spots than others and the electric yellow cichlids is the different sex determined by the lower anal fin as some are black and some are not, PLEASE HELP ME !! ( PANTHER):fish:

kaybee
08-29-2009, 01:25 PM
can anyone tell the difference sexes between male and female blue malawi

Will need some more info here as a multitude of lake malawi african cichlids are blue, or blue-black striped to some degree. Is it a hap, peacock or mbuna?What is the species of cichlid that you have? Are you able to describe them or post pictures of them?

why do some have more egg spots than others and the electric yellow cichlids is the different sex determined by the lower anal fin as some are black and some are not

The quantity of egg-spots will vary among individual and both genders can have them, and they aren't indicative of gender. One of my male red zebras has a bunch of eggspots, while another male has 4. I had a female red zebra that had 8 eggspots (she's mother of most of the red zebras I have so her gender is not in question), meanwhile her one of her daughters has 1 egg spot and another doesn't have any.

In regards to electric yellow labs, gender cannot be determined by fin-line color either. A low-quality male may have less bold markings than a high-quality female.

Gender determination of cichlids can be done by venting them. But you need to physically handle the fish and closely observe their openings. Some will say that venting is the ONLY way to be sure of gender, but I don't necessarily believe that. Case in point, I have a single tropheus duboisi in a mbuna tank. Every 4 months or so the tropheus will mouthbrood its own eggs (unfertilized of course, but instinctively compelled to mouthbrood). The eggs usually get eaten in 2 or 3 days. Clearly this fish is a female. Venting is completely unnecessary in this instance. Venting, however, is typically usefull when trying to a) determine gender in monomorphic species and b) when constructing a specific gender ratio in the aquarium.

Gender can also be determined via other means (the proportionate size of the pectoral fins, the shape of the dorsal and anal fin tips, certain colors or patterns depending on species, etc).

Behavioral patterns are also highly indicative. While the genders of certain cichlids may be difficult to discern to the human eye, the cichlids themselves know without a doubt who is male and female. How they interact with each other can be extremely informative as well.

Northernguy
08-29-2009, 02:30 PM
Welcome to the Fabulous AC!:22:
As Kaybee described we need more info to help you.