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View Full Version : Recommended Tank Size?: Betta Splendens



VoidParadigm
07-01-2009, 10:43 PM
I've seen everything from those ridiculously tiny cups to twenty gallon tanks recommended for betta splendens. So, the title pretty much sums it up; what size tank would you recommend?

bigbad-ratman
07-01-2009, 10:48 PM
while bettas supposedly evovled to survive in tiny puddles of rice paddies, why not do the best you can for them? i have one of my bettas in a 2.5 gal, which would the smallest i would recomend. there are not very speedy, but they do seem inquisitive, so they should have some stimulation. "Crips" has a good bit of room and a couple of plants to keep him interested. when i find a "cave" for him that will fit his tank i plan on adding that. even if they can "survive" in those little cups, they cant thrive i dont think.

VoidParadigm
07-01-2009, 10:52 PM
=] Thank you. Yeah, there is no way I would put pretty much any fish in something smaller than a five gallon, to be honest.

Not planning on actually getting one, but I was very curious about the topic. Thanks for the information.

Wild Turkey
07-01-2009, 10:58 PM
2.5 would be bare minimum imo, and really I would do 5 gallons for a male If possible. Since females can be kept in most community aquariums, I really dont see a reason to house any in a 2.5 unless you already have one on hand, a 5 gal is around the same cost usually.

bigbad-ratman
07-01-2009, 11:00 PM
Not planning on actually getting one, but I was very curious about the topic. Thanks for the information.

awww...come on and join the club!!! i love my little guys and the character they bring to my tanks.

Jacko
07-02-2009, 12:00 AM
I'd say 2.5 gallon heated and filtered tank is the minimum for a betta.

It's said they come from tiny puddles, but that's a major misinterpretation... their native habitats can range from a couple gallons to upwards of 200.

here's something to give you the idea of just how big a rice paddy can be
http://www.cultureshocktherapy.com/pic/id/rice_paddy.jpg

VoidParadigm
07-02-2009, 12:04 AM
awww...come on and join the club!!! i love my little guys and the character they bring to my tanks.

Haha, maybe in the future. University will offer limited choices for fishkeeping, so, maybe then. =P
---
Mm, hm. The 'bettas can live in a cup' rule could be compared to humans living in a 5 foot by 5 foot room. Sure, we'd survive, but we'd sure not like it!

Gayle
07-02-2009, 12:05 AM
2.5g is ok, they will live. I prefer a minimum of 5g, but 10g ideally.

iceywind
07-02-2009, 12:18 AM
I have my betta in a 3 gal. I wouldn't get anything smaller. He loves to swim around .

matthew.shelly
07-02-2009, 12:58 AM
i kept one in a 2.5 but upgraded it to a 5.5 shortly after. honestly, i think for keeping one by itself, a 5.5 is perfect. mine loved it.

Mvjnz
07-02-2009, 01:54 AM
Rice paddies are not tiny, they are huge. And how could its natural habitat be a puddle of 2 gallons? Think about it - how would it breed? Where would the babies go? Obviously that can't be the case.

Their natural habitat are swamps and rivers, they end up in the rice paddies because the nearby rivers are used as irrigation, and as the paddy starts to dry up, some of the fish are caught in the tiny puddles that are left. But this is not their natural habitat.

A fighter deserves just as much room to move and an interesting environment full of plants and caves just like any other fish, and from personal experience I would say the minimum you can create a good habitat in is about 20-25 litres. But bigger is better.

Little Embers
07-02-2009, 06:51 AM
Rice paddies are not tiny, they are huge. And how could its natural habitat be a puddle of 2 gallons? Think about it - how would it breed? Where would the babies go? Obviously that can't be the case.

Their natural habitat are swamps and rivers, they end up in the rice paddies because the nearby rivers are used as irrigation, and as the paddy starts to dry up, some of the fish are caught in the tiny puddles that are left. But this is not their natural habitat.

A fighter deserves just as much room to move and an interesting environment full of plants and caves just like any other fish, and from personal experience I would say the minimum you can create a good habitat in is about 20-25 litres. But bigger is better.
Excellent post IMO!

I found this article to be very interesting indeed:
http://badmanstropicalfish.com/articles/article38.html

Wild Turkey
07-02-2009, 07:05 AM
They have developed the ability to breathe air because getting stuck in puddles is part of their natural habitat and life. However, it does not mean they should be kept in a puddle sized aquarium. I think both statements are misleading.

Mvjnz
07-02-2009, 10:57 AM
No, they need to breathe air because they come from swamps which are extremely low in oxygen - stagnant water. Nothing to do with puddles.

iZinedane
07-02-2009, 12:12 PM
a min of 2.5g
but they will be more happy in a 5g or more thumbs2:

thrakuarium
07-02-2009, 01:29 PM
As you can see in my sig a 3 gallon is the smallest tank I have a betta in. I don't like recommending any smaller than 2.5 and I always think a heater is necessary if you want them to thrive. I believe a 5 gallon is the optimal situation for a betta, but a 10 on sale is hard to turn down :hmm3grin2orange:

Wild Turkey
07-02-2009, 02:02 PM
No, they need to breathe air because they come from swamps which are extremely low in oxygen - stagnant water. Nothing to do with puddles.

Bettas inhabit streams, rivers ponds pools lakes swamps and rice paddies. Labby fish come from all over the world.

Earlier in this thread, you yourself name streams as another natural habitat of betta splendens.

That is all I will say about the matter, not looking to argue about something so trivial, not helping any users.



Give your betta the largest tank you can afford within reason. It will appreciate it.

Sarkazmo
07-02-2009, 02:40 PM
I have these all containing betta:
1/2 gallon hospital tanks
1 gallon rectangle with a special needs betta
1 gal cylinder with a gentle bubbler, Java Moss and LED lighting, soon to have a Palm filter and CFL lighting
1.5G planted cube with CFL, eco complete, live plants and moss, hardscaping, CO2 injection, and a filter that'll filter the whole tank volume over once a minute.
3G planted with CFL eco complete good filtering, fully planted, Java Moss, Marimo, and two Dwarf African Frogs.
10G planted wich CFL, eco complete, marine natural white sand, Penguin 100, 4 betta femmes, 1 male, 1 black swordtail, 2 corys, and 12 Ghost Shrimp.

You have to keep their water quality pristine, give them an environment that they can interact with and show them some attention and they're quite content. All of my tanks will be getting Flourish Excel, Boyds Vita-chem, and Indian Almond Leaves very soon. They all have names, they can learn to take food from your hand, they're intelligent beyond what one would expect of a fish, Hell, I even talk to them. These are all very content fish, if the quality is excellent then the quantity can be low.

Sark

PS: That being said, sure I'd love to have them all in their own 10G tanks but I don't have the room. If you can, do.

Sark

AmazingH
07-02-2009, 07:35 PM
I purchase my tanks from Big Al's in Canada.

A 2.5 gallon tank - just the tank, no lid, stand etc. is around $8

Aa 5.5 gallon tank - bare, just like the 2.5 - is $10.

$2 difference. Why not treat your betta to a double-sized tank?

That, with a sponge or box filter, a heater (optional), a home-made screen lid, some gravel and java moss, makes a great home for a male or female betta!

I can usually put together one of these tanks for under $30 (fish included)
When I decided to set up another tank, I always look for rescues before I go and buy that beautiful baby blue halfmoon at my lfs.

I would also recommend a 10 gallon tank divided into 2, 3 or 4 slots.

Mvjnz
07-03-2009, 04:08 AM
Bettas inhabit streams, rivers ponds pools lakes swamps and rice paddies. Labby fish come from all over the world.

Earlier in this thread, you yourself name streams as another natural habitat of betta splendens.

That is all I will say about the matter, not looking to argue about something so trivial, not helping any users.



Give your betta the largest tank you can afford within reason. It will appreciate it.


If you actually think about it, you will realise that your puddle theory doesn't make sense. They developed the labyrinth organ before they started ending up in rice paddies, which have only been around for a few thousand years.

A very small minority of rivers and lakes would ever be reduced to 2 gallon puddles and that would only happen in extremely dry areas of the planet.

It's not trivial, because as long as people think fighters originated in tiny puddles, they will keep putting them in tanks that are so small that they wouldn't put any other living creature in them, except perhaps shrimp.

They do not come from puddles, and putting them in tiny tanks is not ok.

VoidParadigm
07-03-2009, 04:13 AM
Hrm. Really, forget I even asked. I asked for -your- as in -you- as in -the person reading this right now-'s opinion on the best tank size. Debating each other defeats the purpose of this thread, honestly.

I do appreciate all of your opinions, though.
And apologies if that came off as angry, or some other like-minded emotion. That's not the intent.

Northernguy
07-03-2009, 04:17 AM
I have always considered a ten to be great size for a beta.
They use the whole tank continuously. They sure don't swim in circles like they do in a cup.They are real fish and deserve the room to swim in.

bigbad-ratman
07-03-2009, 12:08 PM
i started them in one of the divided "betta bowls". now, i have one, Crips in a 2.5 gal by himself, and the other Bloods went from a 45 gal he shared to a 10 gal he shares. they have both exhibited the same level of activity and inquisitiveness during the time i have had them. both seem happy and healthy. Crips' bubble nest has almost covered the top of his 2.5 gal. as i have heard they will only nest when they are happy and secure i take that as a good sign.