PDA

View Full Version : crocea clam



annie p
04-20-2009, 04:29 PM
I got a beautiful blue crocea clam. I hope I can make it happy. Anybody have one?

Northernguy
04-20-2009, 05:48 PM
I havent got one but I would love to see some pics of it!:22:

cocoa_pleco
04-20-2009, 06:31 PM
I had a nice tridacna but my lunar wrasse ate it

annie p
04-20-2009, 06:43 PM
oh no!!!
I've been reading and am a little concerned about my flame angel....

unleashed
04-21-2009, 02:39 AM
what are you lighting and parameters?

These are the most difficult of all the ornamental clams we keep

ILuvMyGoldBarb
04-21-2009, 02:43 AM
I hope I can make it happy. This is about the worst statement a reef hobbyist can make. If you don't know enough about the animal to know if you can keep it "happy" then you have no business buying it. How big is it and what is your lighting like? Crocea's are the most delicate of the Tridacnids.

annie p
04-21-2009, 11:10 AM
Why must you always attack people here? I wasn't sure so called the store it's a 1st grade maxima and I have matel halides. It's about 3 inches.

This is not a very welcoming site like it used to be. Instead off offering advice you start assuming and attacking.

BTW a couple months ago when most of you said I would kill the anemone I was getting, it's thriving and twice as big. So no, I don't listen to most of you that think you know it all.

By "keeping it happy" you can research an animal til your eyeballs fall out and give it the best home possible and that doesn't guarantee that it will live a long and happy life. there are too many other variables you may not even be aware of. I think I'm done with this site.

unleashed
04-21-2009, 12:01 PM
Why must you always attack people here?

We don't. People who don't do research bring all of these 'attacks' on themselves. You bought a copperband butterfly. If you had done even 10 minutes of research on an industry-independent site you would have realised that these fish are totally unacceptable for aquariums. The negative responses you have been getting are not unique to the saltwater section on AC. They occur on pretty much all saltwater websites when a person breaks the common and easily researchable concepts of the hobby. Like adding a yellow tang to a 30g tank or buying a copperband butterfly without doing any decent research whatsoever.

Toughen up annie p. Life is cruel and impersonal. We're not trying to cause offense, only enlighten you to the fact that some of your purchasing decisions will lead to your own heartbreak.

I wasn't sure so called the store it's a 1st grade maxima and I have matel halides. It's about 3 inches.[/QUOTE]

Just because you have halides doesn't mean that it will be healthy. It's like corals, you can't just throw them under halides because halides are powerful. Your clam may survive, it may not. Just because it's first grade has nothing to do with it's health or it's hardiness in your system. Most of the time the term "first grade" is simply a marketing spin to justify higher prices.


This is not a very welcoming site like it used to be. Instead off offering advice you start assuming and attacking.

This still is a welcoming site. You just have to realise that the marine aquarium side of the aquarium hobby is very blunt and 'to-the-point'. As I said above, you will find these attitudes at over 99% of all websites you go to.


BTW a couple months ago when most of you said I would kill the anemone I was getting, it's thriving and twice as big. So no, I don't listen to most of you that think you know it all.

Just because the anemone is swollen doesn't mean that it is healthy. In substandard system, many anemones will just whither away. However, there are some which swell and give he appearance of looking healthy. They do this to increase their surface area to in order to absorb more light as something is lacking (Fenner et al.)

You are the one making the assumption that we "know it all". We have never said this. Our advice is based on decades of culminated research and experience between myself and others on this site. You can accept it or not. It is your choice. But as I said, none of us have ever said we know it all. I personally think that it is foolish and somewhat arrogant of you to completely disregard our or others advice. If you don't like what we have to say, do some of your own research and you will see that we are not far off what all the experts and academic texts state.


By "keeping it happy" you can research an animal til your eyeballs fall out and give it the best home possible and that doesn't guarantee that it will live a long and happy life. there are too many other variables you may not even be aware of.

Yup, precisely. A perfect example of this is your copperband. I have contemplated one. However, I will not attempt one until I am sure I can provide optimum conditions for it's survival. I know full well that with over 99% of specimens all efforts to aid their survival are futile as they will perish anyway. Ask yourself, will a fish which is slowly withering away really be happy?


I think I'm done with this site.

In my opinion, good. You never take note of our advice. I just feel sorry for your fish.

ILuvMyGoldBarb
04-21-2009, 12:13 PM
Annie, we tell you the facts. If you don't want to hear the facts, then you're right, maybe this isn't the place for you. If you want to call helping attacking, then you need to get a new perspective on things. I don't recall anyone telling you the anemone would die, but in a young tank, the fact is, they have a very low survival rate. The fact is, Crocea clams are the most sensitive of the Tridacnids are are going to be a challenge. The fact is, the more you know about a creature gives you a much higher chance of keeping it happy. Yes there are a lot of variables, and the hobbyist can control 99% of them. Were, not a bunch of ogres here, we are experienced, and we are speaking from that experience and from our own research.

I wasn't sure so called the store it's a 1st grade maxima
You simply prove my point here. If you had done ample research, you would have known it was a maxima and not a crocea.

The fact is, there are a lot of dedicated SW forums on the internet and there's not a single one that wouldn't caution you against an anemone in a young tank, getting a crocea instead of a maxima, squamosa, or derasa, and there's not one that wouldn't tell you to research your purchases first. So if you think you are getting something different here then you would get elsewhere, I'm afraid you are mistaken.

I can see how you could take my post as attacking, and I apologize, it certainly was not meant to be that. However, when we do advise you, we advise based on facts and on years of experience and we draw on the collective years of experience of many other marine hobbyists. Sometimes, you seem to take that and run opposite to it as though we don't know what we are talking about.

annie p
04-21-2009, 12:22 PM
OK unleased is right, everything in my tank is going to die. ILMGB You bought a copperband didn't you........ why am I so much worse? Yes I did research, my husband was set on one, we found a large one, and decided to try. Why am I being crucified for that? AND, when small, maxima and crocea are easily mistaken, I'm not a marine biologist.

Wiggs
04-21-2009, 12:26 PM
OK unleased is right, everything in my tank is going to die. ILMGB You bought a copperband didn't you........ why am I so much worse? Yes I did research, my husband was set on one, we found a large one, and decided to try. Why am I being crucified for that? AND, when small, maxima and crocea are easily mistaken, I'm not a marine biologist.

When did unleashed ever say everything in your tank was going to die? Please....

ILMGB apologized, now you are continuing your defense when no one is attacking you. In fact, I would say that in your own defense, you were being meaner to him then he ever was to you....

They were trying to help you, the same type of answer you would get on 99.9% of saltwater forums from someone I would imagine. Just because someone says you should have done more research doesn't mean they aren't still offering you advice. You ignored all of the advice that ILMGB gave you solely because he told you that you should have researched it all.


I think what it comes down to in a lot of tanks is that Aquariums are a science as well as a hobby, your tank can;t be the exception to EVERY industry norm.

ILuvMyGoldBarb
04-21-2009, 12:35 PM
ILMGB You bought a copperband didn't you........ why am I so much worse? I also have years of experience in the hobby. Your experience is measured by a few months. If someone with years experience like unleashed is not willing to try one, and I, with years of experinece am unable to keep one, what makes you think it's a good idea for you to try?
This is waht both unleashed an I were talking about, you sem to think our experience counts for nothing.

Finally, any amount of research on the Tridacnid clams would have revealed to you that at the size you have, simply throwing them under Halides is not going to work, they need to be fed copious amounts of food. Until they hit 4-5" they rely mostly on food to grow, not light. Even at that, your clam is going to need continual feeding, just not as much as it does now. That said, even at 3" they are distinguishable, even to the hobbyist that does enough research.

unleashed
04-21-2009, 12:36 PM
I never said that everything in your tank will die.

The copperband will die within a year - most likely within a couple of months.

Your anemone may die. Swelling can cause death or in about 40% of circumstances it will survive

Again, I would say that the clam may die depending on how you run things and what things are like now. As your research should have shown, small clams, even aquacultured have poor survival rates in home aquaria

annie p
04-21-2009, 12:53 PM
OK enough. I would like to know however, why you think my anemone is swollen? I never posted any pic.

Also on RC, the concensus was that my lights are good as far as the clam. It's a debate about feeding, some say never, some do feed. I have phyto and will feed since I have some non-photsynthetic. Also, no where have I read about poor survival rates on clams, spending alot of time on RC. I don't consider my tanks substandard. I change my FW 50% every week, and SW 20% weekly. I think my problem is I post everything I've done wrong. My cyano problem is an area about 6x10" only, no where else. It's really not a big mess. I'm not real good about pics but will try to post.

thank you...

unleashed
04-21-2009, 12:57 PM
BTW a couple months ago when most of you said I would kill the anemone I was getting, it's thriving and twice as big. So no, I don't listen to most of you that think you know it all.

Normal growth for an anemone would never result in it being "twice as big" in such a short space of time

Also, there is a misconception that anemone splitting is a healthy sign, however, it has been found that immense stress can cause splitting (Fenner et al. & Michaels et al.)

unleashed
04-21-2009, 12:58 PM
Also on RC, the concensus was that my lights are good as far as the clam. It's a debate about feeding, some say never, some do feed. I have phyto and will feed since I have some non-photsynthetic.

While the lights may be "good", as you stated earlier, there are "many variables".

E.g. some people think that because they have a skimmer and halides they can successfully keep SPS. Unfortunately, most of these attempts fail until a specimen which is durable enough to survive is found

travie
04-21-2009, 01:04 PM
[QUOTE=annie p]
BTW a couple months ago when most of you said I would kill the anemone I was getting, it's thriving and twice as big. So no, I don't listen to most of you that think you know it all.[QUOTE]


For the record, at that time you did not have Metal Halides or a good T5 light. Since then you upgraded lighting, which increased the chance of it living and thriving. At the time we were justified in saying it had a poor survival rate, because you didn't have good lighting for one.

Everyone here only has the best of intentions for the fish, coral, inverts, and your bank account.

ILuvMyGoldBarb
04-21-2009, 01:06 PM
It's a debate about feeding, some say never, some do feed. That debate deals with ongoing feeding as the clams grow to full size. At 3" and under, the feeding is not part of the debate, it is actually a well documented fact and well known among hobbyists that they must be fed at this size. Failure to feed them at this size will result in a poor performance.
The survival rate for clams does not apply to them over all sizes ranges, simply from 3" and under. 3" and smaller clams do have a very poor survival rate in tanks. If you ask on a majority of sites, if people are truly honest with you, they will advise you not to purchase one that is 3" or smaller. Personally, if I ever set up a tank capable of supporting a clam long term, I will purchase one that is at least 4" or larger.

unleashed
04-21-2009, 01:11 PM
good call travie.

i don't think that i was part of that thread.......

I think this is the thread here:

http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/aquariumforum/showthread.php?t=38756


couple months ago when most of you said I would kill the anemone I was getting, it's thriving and twice as big. So no, I don't listen to most of you that think you know it all.

I think you owe some people an apology for this statement after I read through that thread. They were perfectly justified in telling you what they did. I would have told you the same

annie p
04-21-2009, 01:29 PM
Yep, sorry. The one where everyone said it would die was the yellow, and it did.

I never would have dreamed the store owner would sell a dyed anemone being a member of the reef club, so I didn't think it was.

To clarify, my anemone now, since getting halides, has perked up and is fuller. Sorry for just saying twice as big.