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shalafi04
04-07-2009, 05:14 AM
I was curious what you all think about the commonly seen statement... 5 gallons per discus. Because I'm not really buying it.

In that theory alone they are stating my 40g could hold 8 discus! I think not. my 6 juvenile Angels were cramed and they were not even 2". Now there are only 2 measuring on 6" and its perfect, but I couldn't imagine 4 more fish of that size living in a 40g and being happy.

Whats your take??? :goldfish:

Cameron
04-07-2009, 05:40 AM
I think thats rediculous, but also you can't ever just think X amount of fish per Y amount of gallons, theirs lots of factors going into it. But i think 5 is too low for discus, although i've never owned one or do i know too much about them.

shalafi04
04-07-2009, 06:05 AM
yeah I agree. I think they warrant a certain amount of respect. And I dont get where people pull this stuff from. Like the 1" of fish per gal. yeah cause an 18" shark will be THRILLED in a 20gal. :/ dumb people are a beating

Algenco
04-07-2009, 01:29 PM
15g per discus minimum, 20g would be better

shalafi04
04-07-2009, 06:44 PM
:ssuprised: HOLY MOLY! ALGENCO! You're harshin my mellow. Thats bu-ku Aqua

Algenco
04-07-2009, 06:56 PM
that nothing compared to the water needed for wc, young discus must have frequent large water changes in order to develop properly.
Jack Wattely the Discus King changes 70%+ daily

Kadina
04-07-2009, 07:02 PM
I've read about some sort of slow drip systems that remove the need for water changes all together. Would that work for discus too if the same volume of water was exchanged just at a slower drip rate?

Algenco
04-07-2009, 07:25 PM
drip of flow through systems work well but you actually use more water that way.
All fish secrete a hormone that inhibits growth, it's natures way of keeping them from outgrowing their habitat.
Certain fish are more sensitive to the hormone than others, discus are especially sensitive and will not develop properly without large frequent water changes and will develop a football shape instead of the desired pancake shape.
Buying larger discus from a reputable source can save you some work but the cost a lot more.

Dkarc
04-08-2009, 01:39 AM
Stocking densities are all dependent on your filtration. It is possible (and practiced) to keep fish at densities of 1 pound of fish per gallon of water. Though this is practiced mostly on food fish, ornamentals are slowly approaching such numbers. It is a very scary thought on how many fish COULD be fit into a tank/system knowing that a 2" discus weighs less than 10 grams (on average). Stendker in Germany is one of the only discus breeders in the world that practices such high stocking densities (that I know of). Their systems are most likely only 1/3lb per gallon of water, but even then that is a lot of fish in a tank (an average adult male is 12-14oz). Follow this link: www.drpez.net/panel/showthread.php?t=282514 . About 2/3 of the way down you can see pics of how high stocking density they grow their discus at. Now for the common hobbyist I recommend no higher than 1 discus per 10 gallons. Yes you can go for less, and it will make tank maintenance a bit more lax, but the general rule of thumb is 1 discus/10g.

-Ryan

shalafi04
04-08-2009, 02:25 AM
how sad those pictures are. those fish must be miserable. :(

fraggle
04-08-2009, 02:35 AM
Crikeys!!!

That's a lot of fish in a little area!!!

Shalafi I think the 1 inch of fish per gallon (which I've heard is a square inch of fish, which would make more sense since it takes in the length as well as the depth and height of the fish) is the same person who figures out how many people a lift (elevator) can hold. Have you ever stood in a lift and looked at how many people it's rated to hold?!?!?!? You and 3 other people can barely not touch each other and yet it says that it can hold 35 people! LOL.

shalafi04
04-08-2009, 03:38 AM
lol Fraggle.... true. very true. Not a fan of the compact box of death myself... I mean.... elevators. yeah there is no way those fish are happy...

Kadina
04-08-2009, 02:47 PM
All fish secrete a hormone that inhibits growth, it's natures way of keeping them from outgrowing their habitat.

I had no idea...thanks for this information. Is this what people are referring to when they talk stunting a fish?

Dkarc
04-08-2009, 09:41 PM
how sad those pictures are. those fish must be miserable. :(

I kinda doubt they are miserable considering that they grow very fast in such conditions and are pretty healthy.

-Ryan

shalafi04
04-08-2009, 09:56 PM
yea but is it not true that there is a difference between comfort and health. I mean I do not live comfortably around here but I manage to stretch my finances far enough to keep my family fed. The only reason they grow well and healthy is because of diet and water quality. Healthy doesnt equal happy

Dkarc
04-08-2009, 10:18 PM
True, but if a fish isnt comfortable then they wont eat (this is especially true with discus). Chronic stress = reduced growth/health (same applies to us humans). There are plenty of other fish out there (if not all to an extent) that show this, but discus especially exhibit this tendency. And when they dont eat, they dont grow (obviously). So healthy, fast growing fish means happy fish. You also have to realize that those fish have been kept in those conditions for generations and that is all they have been exposed to.

-Ryan