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Deleted User
01-16-2009, 08:47 PM
Hi

I have 6 onion plants in my 6 foot cichlid tank.

They have little plantlets growing on the parent bulb.

I have never had this happen before. What is the best way to take the young plants off the adult plant ?

Do I cut them off or break them off the bulb ?

Thanks :ssmile:

lovleeko
01-25-2009, 10:00 PM
Hi

I have 6 onion plants in my 6 foot cichlid tank.

They have little plantlets growing on the parent bulb.

I have never had this happen before. What is the best way to take the young plants off the adult plant ?

Do I cut them off or break them off the bulb ?

Thanks :ssmile:


Are the onion plants easy to grow celtic? I was thinking of getting some.

Dave66
01-25-2009, 10:12 PM
loveleeko, yes, very easy, as long as you have a deep, enough iron-rich substrate that's fine grain, and full-spectrum light. Between 2 and 6 watts per gallon. More light, better it grows and better it looks. The depth is so you can half-bury the bulb, with enough below it so it can take root. Only problem is the size of the plant. The smaller species has meter-long leaves, the larger, and more common species, has leaf lengths around two meters.

Celtic Fins, that's how they vegetatively propagate. When the little plantlets develop a bulb of their own and break themselves off the parent bulb, you can then replant them wherever you choose. You'll start seeing a small bump below those plantlets presently, and in a few weeks, will grow into a bulb.

Dave

lovleeko
01-25-2009, 11:49 PM
loveleeko, yes, very easy, as long as you have a deep, enough iron-rich substrate that's fine grain, and full-spectrum light. Between 2 and 6 watts per gallon. More light, better it grows and better it looks. The depth is so you can half-bury the bulb, with enough below it so it can take root. Only problem is the size of the plant. The smaller species has meter-long leaves, the larger, and more common species, has leaf lengths around two meters.

Celtic Fins, that's how they vegetatively propagate. When the little plantlets develop a bulb of their own and break themselves off the parent bulb, you can then replant them wherever you choose. You'll start seeing a small bump below those plantlets presently, and in a few weeks, will grow into a bulb.

Dave


I don't :) In my biggest tank I highly doubt the wattage is 2 per gallon. The ten gallon I was going to plant really well has sand but I was planning on root tabs. Maybe I could mix with some flourite. IDK

Deleted User
01-27-2009, 01:40 PM
loveleeko, yes, very easy, as long as you have a deep, enough iron-rich substrate that's fine grain, and full-spectrum light. Between 2 and 6 watts per gallon. More light, better it grows and better it looks. The depth is so you can half-bury the bulb, with enough below it so it can take root. Only problem is the size of the plant. The smaller species has meter-long leaves, the larger, and more common species, has leaf lengths around two meters.

Celtic Fins, that's how they vegetatively propagate. When the little plantlets develop a bulb of their own and break themselves off the parent bulb, you can then replant them wherever you choose. You'll start seeing a small bump below those plantlets presently, and in a few weeks, will grow into a bulb.

Dave

Thanks Dave thumbs2:

loveleeko Onion plants are easy to grow & very hardy plants. These are the only plants I know 100% that will not be touched by my cichlids. :hmm3grin2orange: I have always had them in my tanks but have never had them reproduce. Mine are in sand and nothing special is done. My lighting isn't all that euither and I have the larger ones and yes the leaves grow to well over 2 meters. Very hardy plants for sure. :ssmile:

lovleeko
01-27-2009, 03:40 PM
Thanks Dave thumbs2:

loveleeko Onion plants are easy to grow & very hardy plants. These are the only plants I know 100% that will not be touched by my cichlids. :hmm3grin2orange: I have always had them in my tanks but have never had them reproduce. Mine are in sand and nothing special is done. My lighting isn't all that euither and I have the larger ones and yes the leaves grow to well over 2 meters. Very hardy plants for sure. :ssmile:


Oh, thanks celtic. That is reassuring. They have the moderate light one at petsmart. Crinum thaianum (or something like that:) And I have no idea what my big tank lights are. They can't be great because they are stock with the hood. Do you fertilize them or anything? What type of sand do you use? Mine is pretty fine I think. Thanks again celtic. I really want an onion plant

Lady Hobbs
01-27-2009, 03:44 PM
My onion plants did very well, too. The biggest problem is keeping them in the sand until they can get rooted. With only part of the bulb planted, it can be different to keep fish from tearing them out for awhile. Stack some rocks up around them and that may help.

lovleeko
01-27-2009, 03:47 PM
My onion plants did very well, too. The biggest problem is keeping them in the sand until they can get rooted. With only part of the bulb planted, it can be different to keep fish from tearing them out for awhile. Stack some rocks up around them and that may help.


Thanks lady hobbs. I'll try that. I'm getting all excited. I've been looking at those onion plants for a few months. Do you think it will need some root tabs since it is sand?

Lady Hobbs
01-27-2009, 08:02 PM
Everything in sand could use some plant tabs. Sand is lacking in everything good for plants.

If you have fish that try to tear them up, you can pot them and put the pot in the tank, too. This is one plant that silver dollars are not supposed to eat.

Wild Turkey
01-27-2009, 08:17 PM
Everything in sand could use some plant tabs. Sand is lacking in everything good for plants.


Good advice thumbs2:

lovleeko
01-27-2009, 11:33 PM
Thanks much hobbsthumbs2: :11:

Deleted User
01-28-2009, 01:18 PM
Everything in sand could use some plant tabs. Sand is lacking in everything good for plants.

If you have fish that try to tear them up, you can pot them and put the pot in the tank, too. This is one plant that silver dollars are not supposed to eat.

I have never used ANY ferts on any of my plants. Hmm I must just have wet green fingers. :hmm3grin2orange:

I know a lot of people have problems with cabomba but mine grows like a weed.

Lady Hobbs
01-28-2009, 03:35 PM
Plants should have some nutrients at the roots which is why so many use flourish, eco-complete, laterite, etc. If you use substrate with no nutrients at all you need to add it yourself. I've used nothing but plant tabs for some time and only started using liquid ferts a couple weeks ago. Frankly, I perfer the tabs.

Flourish tabs are expensive, tho, but last a long time. I will be getting some not so expensive and see how it goes. Thinking of getting these.

http://www.aquariumplants.com/AquariumPlants_com_s_own_SUBSTRATE_VITALIZATION_p/fert.htm

The 75 total tabs for 10.95. Flourish tabs are 50 cents each. Too expensive for my wallet.

Deleted User
01-29-2009, 12:32 PM
Plants should have some nutrients at the roots which is why so many use flourish, eco-complete, laterite, etc. If you use substrate with no nutrients at all you need to add it yourself. I've used nothing but plant tabs for some time and only started using liquid ferts a couple weeks ago. Frankly, I perfer the tabs.

Flourish tabs are expensive, tho, but last a long time. I will be getting some not so expensive and see how it goes. Thinking of getting these.

http://www.aquariumplants.com/AquariumPlants_com_s_own_SUBSTRATE_VITALIZATION_p/fert.htm

The 75 total tabs for 10.95. Flourish tabs are 50 cents each. Too expensive for my wallet.

Thanks Lady Hobbs. thumbs2: