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View Full Version : bare bottom for discus SPAWN OR NOT??????



LORENZO
11-27-2008, 10:35 AM
I AM READING ALOT ABOUT BREEDING THE DISCUS. THE SAME TWO JUST LAID EGGS AGAIN. THE NEW TANK DOES NOT COME IN FOR A COUPLE OF DAYS. I SUPPOSE THESE WILL GET EATEN. NOW FROM WHAT I READ (WATTLEY-breeding discus for beginners)The breeding tank should be bare bottom. Can i put just a lighter layer of substrate? tight sand like substrate? The difficulty is that the parents are from a big well planted in discus home. They will stress out and not mate if i put them in a smaller tank a 75 and don't plant it in. Everything i have read so far is saying to put them in a bare bottom tank. Also does anyone have another good book they have read on discus breeding. The eggs this morning are still there and they are guarding them against the other discus.

Lady Hobbs
11-27-2008, 01:27 PM
How about just adding some potted plants and keep the bottom bare? They'd have the cleanliness of the bare tank and the security of the plants both.

Fishguy2727
11-27-2008, 03:56 PM
The bare bottom method is to make cleanup easy. I have found sand to be just as easy to keep clean but still keep it natural (unlike the hospital room effect bare bottom gives). Keep in mind some people are breeding discus in planted massive display tanks, so there is not just one way to breed them. The bare bottom method is used by people who have lots of tanks, little time, and need it as efficient as possible. It is the minimalist method used by many, but not my preference.

LORENZO
11-28-2008, 12:00 AM
How about just adding some potted plants and keep the bottom bare? They'd have the cleanliness of the bare tank and the security of the plants both.


yes that would be good but these discus have been housed you see for sooo long in a well planted tank and they love their swords.. They love to swim between them. Their eggs are still fine. oh my i can't save them yet. CAn you end up with too much filtration in a baby tank? Those Rena filters are strong. i am going to take water out of angel tank and discus tank and filll up the 75 so no water shock for the parents. you should see how big the red melon is. Stunning fish if you don't have a salt water set up. Is it true you must cover the sides of the tank so the babies don't lose sight of their parents and it cuts down on glare? i never heard of that. also while i am blabbin on here is it true that activated charcoal is harmful to discus fish? i do not use it anyway in my filter.

LORENZO
11-28-2008, 12:04 AM
The bare bottom method is to make cleanup easy. I have found sand to be just as easy to keep clean but still keep it natural (unlike the hospital room effect bare bottom gives). Keep in mind some people are breeding discus in planted massive display tanks, so there is not just one way to breed them. The bare bottom method is used by people who have lots of tanks, little time, and need it as efficient as possible. It is the minimalist method used by many, but not my preference.
helloooo so i can keep a substrate i will go for finer sand than the seachem that is in the big tank. sooo i wonder how long could fry last in a big tank set up with other discus besides the parents? Could they get to the stage that they would be big enough to take out ..and then put in a baby tank. I would think the other big discus would eat the eggs. But these guys are really guarding those eggs. Fascinating to watch.

Fishguy2727
11-28-2008, 01:58 AM
There is a while article on carbon in my blog. Basically it takes out good stuff and the bad stuff it does take out are best taken out via water changes.

LORENZO
11-29-2008, 12:21 AM
(zfish) I do not use any carbon in either tank. The community tank is running well without it and i find the plants do better. IN the beginning i used it with discus because oh i though this would keep the water crystal clear and heavy metals out of the tank. REading around well then I came to realize no carbon was necessary. I know it removes meds from a tank. But why do they promote these external power canister filters with all these carbon inserts and ammonia inserts? All i am really using ae bio balls and lots of sponges and fine sponges. oh do use a phosphate remover a seachem product.

Fishguy2727
11-29-2008, 04:30 AM
I use Phosphate remover by Seachem on my reef tank, but that's it.

Carbon is an old standard for aquariums, really it is becoming more and more obvious that it was needed then (the overall understanding back then was far from what it is today), but today it is simply unnecessary in almost all tanks.

The ammonia removing media are another scam. There are tons of nitrifying bacteria in there that will do it for free.

What filter do you have the bioballs in? Hopefully a wet/dry or trickle. They are not for submerged use, there are much better biological media for submerged use.

LORENZO
11-29-2008, 08:11 PM
I use Phosphate remover by Seachem on my reef tank, but that's it.

Carbon is an old standard for aquariums, really it is becoming more and more obvious that it was needed then (the overall understanding back then was far from what it is today), but today it is simply unnecessary in almost all tanks.

The ammonia removing media are another scam. There are tons of nitrifying bacteria in there that will do it for free.

What filter do you have the bioballs in? Hopefully a wet/dry or trickle. They are not for submerged use, there are much better biological media for submerged use.
:13: :13: I have the bioballs in an xp 4 and an xp 3. The 75 gallon will have an xp 3 as well. But Lady HObbs thinks get a sponge for when the baby discus arrive. I am really looking forward to filling up this size of tank. Good tank for keeping loaches but for now a breeding tank. Too bad i do not know what sex the red melon is. Those bioballs are working wonders. I don't change these filters too often either. Every three months! I have had aquaclear filters like a 500 which i liked but oh these rena xp are excellent filters. Noiseless.

Fishguy2727
11-30-2008, 01:44 AM
Bioballs are not designed for submerged use. They are designed to be in trickle aka wet/dry filters and allow enough space between surfaces for air to get in and supply oxygen for the nitrifying bacteria. In a submerged use you need something that will provide the most usable surface area per volume, this is generally porous ceramic media (like Biomax, Eheim's one that looks like coco-coco puffs, etc., or even better, Seachem's Matrix). These will make the most use of that space.

LORENZO
12-01-2008, 09:39 PM
Bioballs are not designed for submerged use. They are designed to be in trickle aka wet/dry filters and allow enough space between surfaces for air to get in and supply oxygen for the nitrifying bacteria. In a submerged use you need something that will provide the most usable surface area per volume, this is generally porous ceramic media (like Biomax, Eheim's one that looks like coco-coco puffs, etc., or even better, Seachem's Matrix). These will make the most use of that space.
(zfish) (zfish) (zfish) OKAY THANKS. i will get on that now and go and buy somme eheim ones.