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squirt_12
11-04-2008, 02:00 AM
I have seen them at my LFS and really like them but I think they are a little harder to care for but I am not to sure. All I know is that your Alkalinity and Calcium has to be monitered really closely? And they need medium-high flow? Thats about all I know. I am not sure if it is even correct so thats why I am asking. What type of lighting does it need and what do I have to do to care for one? It would be cool to have one in the future.

ILuvMyGoldBarb
11-04-2008, 02:21 AM
I have 2 different colored candy canes in my tank. They are not difficult to care for at all. Like almost all LPS, they do not like high flow, they prefer medium to low flow. Low to medium light will be fine for them. You can feed them if you want, they will take mysis shrimp quite readily. Alkalinity and Calcium are definitely important for them since that is how they build their skeletons.

kaybee
11-04-2008, 02:23 AM
Calaustrea (known as candy cane coral and also known as trumpet coral) is a very hardy LPS. I consider them to be great 'starter' corals.

I'd say they enjoy low to medium flow, with moderate or even low light requirements (PC or greater light, however).

They're one of the quickest growing LPS in my experience. I've had them drop 'daughter' polyps which have become minor colonies of their own.

How closely alkalinity and calcium need monitoring depends on current levels and how many other stoney corals are in the tank. If this is to be the only hard coral in the tank, then calcium in the salt mix should suffice. I've had them produce additional heads before I began supplementing calcium in the system.

In addition to light, calcium and trace elements, this coral appreciates an occassional feeding. Mysis shrimp is a good food to provide them.

Edit: ILMGB and I are apparently on the same page. :)

Northernguy
11-04-2008, 02:32 AM
LOL ILMGB types faster!

ILuvMyGoldBarb
11-04-2008, 02:35 AM
No, I just typed less. LOL

squirt_12
11-04-2008, 03:01 AM
I thought that they were alot harder to keep than what they sound like. I am using Instant Ocean Salt Mix so would that have enough trace elements for one candycane coral? I can eventually start dosing after it gets bigger. Also, my lighting is 4.5wpg of PC lighting.

kaybee
11-04-2008, 03:06 AM
By one candy cane coral do you mean a single polyp? If so the salt mix should provide it with what it needs. To be sure, test your calcium level the day of or day prior to getting it, then test again 10-14 days later (with no water change during that period). You'll get an idea of what the calcium consumption will be.

The lighting is fine.

squirt_12
11-04-2008, 10:50 PM
By one candy cane coral do you mean a single polyp? If so the salt mix should provide it with what it needs. To be sure, test your calcium level the day of or day prior to getting it, then test again 10-14 days later (with no water change during that period). You'll get an idea of what the calcium consumption will be.

The lighting is fine.

Well it will be one or two polyps when I buy it but it will eventually multiply. So after it multiplies I'll probably have to dose?

kaybee
11-05-2008, 12:13 AM
I'm not sure how often you do your water changes, but test calcium right after and right before a water change to figure out how much calcium has decreased. You can then figure how whether additives are required. If you do monthly water changes and right after a water change the calcium is 420ppm, and then right before the next water change it's 400ppm, you can probably get by on water changes alone. However if it goes from 420 to 400 in a couple of days then supplementation is required.

With just one or two heads of caulastrea I think your salt mix will suffice, I don't think dosing will be necessary (however it depends what your numbers are and different brands of salt mixes have different levels of calcium). After you Instant Ocean salt runs out you may want to consider moving on to Reef Crystals (also made by Instant Ocean) or some other type of salt mix specied for corals (they tend to have more calcium and trace elements than salts meant for FO/FOWLR set ups).

As the coral grows more heads (or if more stonies are added), calcium usage will increase and calcium and other additive supplementation may be required.

snapdragon9
11-07-2008, 08:03 PM
I would classify myself as an intermediate leveled aquarist. But what factors and what role does play in alkalinity within aquaria...all I know is that it may be related to pH...please enlighten me

ILuvMyGoldBarb
11-07-2008, 08:12 PM
In a freshwater tank it is not quite as important as it is in a marine tank. For the freshwater tank the main function of the Carbonate Hardness is buffering capacity of the water, thus dictating how easy it is to change the pH. The higher the KH, the harder it is to change the pH, and as a general rule, the higher the pH is. For a marine tank the alkalinity gains extra importance as the dissolved Calcium Carbonate is used by stony corals and coralline algae mainly although some is used by soft corals as well. That is the simplified version of it. There is a much more indepth and complicated answer.