PDA

View Full Version : What the heck are these?



Fishguy2727
10-22-2008, 09:53 PM
This thing popped out one day while I was feeding. I was able to get two pics and one very blurry video (not worth anything). Poked its head out and then darted back in real quick. Its hole reminds me of the spider web of a spider that makes its web right in a little crevice with only the whole and a little web showing. It is about 3/4-1" long.
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c207/reptileguy2727/IMG_0326.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c207/reptileguy2727/IMG_0327.jpg

These are growing on the glass. They are not growing where light is hitting them, mainly behind the rockwork on the glass. They are also in the skimmer. They are about 1/4" long. No movement like they are actively filter feeding.
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c207/reptileguy2727/IMG_0317.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c207/reptileguy2727/IMG_0318.jpg

kaybee
10-22-2008, 10:01 PM
The stuff on the glass are a type of sponge, beneficial filter feeders ('pineapple sponges', I believe).

Fishguy2727
10-22-2008, 10:05 PM
Sweet, that makes three types of sponges in my tank, and I like pineapple.

rageybug
01-02-2009, 06:25 AM
Those are definately pineapple sponges. They will come and go depending on your tank's water quality. They can get pretty big, about the size of a pencil eraser. As for the other thing, looks like some kind of worm.

snapdragon9
01-04-2009, 02:29 AM
are pineapple sponges relative to good water quality?

unleashed
01-04-2009, 02:41 AM
ditto with the above

The other is an amphipod.

Tigerbarb
01-04-2009, 02:55 AM
Interesting. I just saw a few of those sponges in my tank the other day.

Tigerbarb
01-04-2009, 05:39 PM
So wouldn't these sponges be a bad sign, if they filter feed? As in, a sign that your tank isn't clean enough?

kaybee
01-04-2009, 06:10 PM
Not necessarily since all marine systems inherently containing micro-particulates (microns in size).

One could say that these sponges are supplementing whatever filtration devices are in play (live rock, protein skimmers, etc). The same with 'pods and bristleworms and a host of other micro-invertebrates.

All it takes is the solid waste from a single fish (with the waste eventually breaking down into microscopic dissolved organic compounds) to sustain them.

Fishguy2727
01-04-2009, 10:38 PM
My tank has absolutely no artificial mechanical or biological filtration. All filtration is done by inhabitants in and on the live rock, including bacteria, algae, clams, mussels, sponges (at least four different types so far), feather dusters, worms, hermit crabs, shrimp, etc. The only artificial filtration I have is protein skimmers.

unleashed
01-04-2009, 11:22 PM
My tank has absolutely no artificial mechanical or biological filtration. All filtration is done by inhabitants in and on the live rock, including bacteria, algae, clams, mussels, sponges (at least four different types so far), feather dusters, worms, hermit crabs, shrimp, etc. The only artificial filtration I have is protein skimmers.

In which case you do have biological filtration........ :ssmile:

Fishguy2727
01-04-2009, 11:28 PM
That depends on what you consider a skimmer. The books I have generally lump them in as chemical because if the nature of what they remove, but they do remove some nitrogenous wastes so they do also function as biological.

But I have now biological media or anything, so I don't consider it biological, except for the live rock.

unleashed
01-04-2009, 11:44 PM
The biological filtration is provided by the microfauna on the live rock. A skimmer would technically be a mechanical filtration device

Fishguy2727
01-05-2009, 12:21 AM
Not according to the books, they count it as chemical. And with it also taking out nitrogenous waste it can be counted as biological. But it doesn't really remove debris, so not mechanical.

unleashed
01-05-2009, 01:15 AM
Not according to the books, they count it as chemical. And with it also taking out nitrogenous waste it can be counted as biological. But it doesn't really remove debris, so not mechanical.

I suppose it depends on what definition of chemical/biological/mechanical filtration you use.

Myself and many other reefers I know group skimmers as a form of mechanical filtration as it mechanically (through suction, bubble production etc) removes floating particulate wastes from the water column

I would personally not call them biological filters as they do not remove wastes through biological means. I would also not call them chemical filters as they do not remove wastes through chemical means.

But meh, each to their own I guess. Just depends on what your research sources are and who you've spoken to..... :22:

Fishguy2727
01-05-2009, 01:57 AM
I would define it based on what is being removed. Otherwise if you are using any equipment it is mechanical because of the machines. Biological waste being removed I would count as biological.

The main thing is the only thing I have is skimmers and flow. Mine is a more natural system with minimal reliance on any machines. As a result filter feeders do much better.

kaybee
01-05-2009, 04:05 AM
Biological filtration is filtration performed by a biological agent ('life forms' such as bacteria, etc).

Chemical filtration is performed by chemicals.

Different methods of filtration can tackle the same problem set in many cases (as an example, ammonia and nitrite 'removal', bacteria can do this as well as off the shelf chemical products). Carbon can perform as a mechanical filter (sequestering microscopic solid matter in addition to the chemical properties it has), and biologic filter due to its surface area.

Protein skimmers are perhaps in their own filtration category (foam refraction) and remove a wider scope of substances and can't really be placed in any of the three major filtration methods (mechanical, chemical, biological).