PDA

View Full Version : Do you chemical test your betta tank?



CinRell
01-13-2007, 07:31 PM
I have a 5 gallon. I always use the dechlor water treatment in the water, but should I be doing more?

jman
01-13-2007, 07:32 PM
water changes still...

Betta_noob
01-13-2007, 07:56 PM
Well I believe that you're going to get a lot of varied answers on this one.
But you probally should have a test kit handy so that you can properly be aware of your levels should anything ever happen to your fish.
I think it's a must of fish keeping.

jeffs99dime
01-13-2007, 08:34 PM
i am a firm believer of testing water parameters and conducting water changes frequently no mater the size of the tank! actually, the smaller the tank the more you should be conducting tests often. parameters will fluctuate more rapidly in a smaller tank because there is less area which means there is less water, greatly increasing your chances for the tank to "foul" quicker.--jeff

CinRell
01-13-2007, 11:44 PM
No problem..they make so many test kits for so many things... recommendations?

Drumachine09
01-14-2007, 12:08 AM
Quick dip 5-in-1 is a good tester.

AquaQueen
01-14-2007, 01:16 AM
Well I have to agree that no matter what the size of your tank your key to happy healthy fish is to test and change your water often...I do mine weekly but have a verity of fish so I need to. As for the test strips no matter what kind I used I personally have had incorrect results on a number of tests to the point that I brought water from all of my tanks to my LPS to have them test it and the water was fine in all but one and the test didn't even show me that. So I have since got a Mater Test Kit and have had not one problem with it, I find any problem right away and fix it before there are any fish deaths or diseases. This is only my oppinion, I say you do what you find that helps you best you will have lots of tips and ideas to choose what suits you and your fishies best..Good Luck!

Here is a link that shows the Master test kit and the info on each kit they have.

AquaQueen
01-14-2007, 01:22 AM
lol...oops forgot to paste the link....DUH...here it is http://Welcome to Aquarium Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Glasstapper
01-14-2007, 02:38 AM
I just use dechlorinator, as well. My betta is happy with my pH so I don't need to adjust it. I do, however, perform weekly 50% water changes in my 5 gallon. My 45 gallon gets 60%, so it's only fair he gets just as much fresh water as everyone else. ;)

I do adjust the pH on the 45 gallon. Other than that, I don't use any other chemicals. You really shouldn't need to use any more than the dechlorinator and a pH adjuster (if necessary, though).

blue fin
01-14-2007, 03:14 AM
My wife keeps a betta , she doesn't test anything, just changes the water weekly, it's only a 1 gal tank, she refills the jug and leaves it open to declorinate itself naturally.

f1oored
01-14-2007, 09:45 AM
A test kit is good to have on hand if something looks wrong but I wouldn't worry about testing the water often with a betta. Most people keep these fish in a gallon or so container without a filter (like blue fin's wife). During the week between water changes the quality of the water goes straight to hell. This is how I was keeping my betta for a while and I tested a few times so I know. This nasty water doesn't seem to bother the bettas (because they can breathe at the top). So if you are running a 5 gallon with a filter and doing anything near regular water changes your betta is probably way better off than most bettas. You may want to check the water once in a while but I wouldn't worry about it too much.

If you are looking for a good test kit stay away from the strips and get the master kit. Liquid kits tend to be more accurate and cheaper in the long run. Hope this helped.

Wallyfish
01-14-2007, 11:43 PM
I don't test my Betta tank at all. I do a 100% water change every week in my 1.5 gallon which I treat with aquasafe. My betta doesn't seem to make much of a mess which makes sense to me since he doesn't eat more than a few tiny pellets per day. I'm certain that chemical tests couldn't hurt, especially if you think somethings wrong. I was more concerned about the temperature of the water in my tank actually, since I have yet to find a heater that says that I can use in a tank less than 2 gallons. I've bought a tank thermometer however and I'm currently at about 76F without a heater. I've been using a heater close to my computer desk where my tank is for the colder days.

jman
01-14-2007, 11:52 PM
Quick dip 5-in-1 is a good tester.

i agree with ya

jman
01-14-2007, 11:52 PM
I don't test my Betta tank at all. I do a 100% water change every week in my 1.5 gallon which I treat with aquasafe. My betta doesn't seem to make much of a mess which makes sense to me since he doesn't eat more than a few tiny pellets per day. I'm certain that chemical tests couldn't hurt, especially if you think somethings wrong. I was more concerned about the temperature of the water in my tank actually, since I have yet to find a heater that says that I can use in a tank less than 2 gallons. I've bought a tank thermometer however and I'm currently at about 76F without a heater. I've been using a heater close to my computer desk where my tank is for the colder days.
do 10% changes for now on dude!

Wallyfish
01-15-2007, 12:10 AM
Why only 10%? Mainly I'm trying to get my fish poo out of my tank which stays on the bottom unless I pour all the water out. I scoop my betta into a holding cup thats about maybe .3 or .4 gal while I do this.

jman
01-15-2007, 12:14 AM
dude that's too much how are you syphoning the water?

the cichlids i have produce a lot of waste but i don't have to do this.

Wallyfish
01-15-2007, 12:53 AM
I've got a small air filter cycling the water. Theres some specks of fish poo that I can see at the bottom of the tank. I don't do the same with my other larger tank because I'm concerned about the bacteria and its much more work and I would have to catch all of my fish and store them in a larger area. That would be bigger project. Pouring out the 1.5gal tank is really easy to do. One thing about my 1.5gal tank is that I can't gravel vac it. I guess the small container that I put my betta in while I do this might make the water change more like 80% than 100%.

jman
01-15-2007, 02:59 AM
anything with a gallon or more needs water treatment if a fish is kept in it. if the water is not changed unsceen problems will occur.

f1oored
01-15-2007, 03:49 AM
Most people who keep bettas without filtration in small bowls do 100% water changes. Without filtration the good bacteria will likely not form as they are needed. Before I put my betta in my 6 gallon he was in a gallon bowl and I did weekly 100% water changes and added stress coat to the water each time. This is all the fish needs. Bettas aren't effected by ammonia and nitrate levels like other fish because they have an organ that allows them to breathe air from the surface.

Wally it sounds like you are doing everything right.

Betta_noob
01-15-2007, 05:08 PM
Um bettas are indeed still affected by the water conditions.
Amonia is a horrible thing to a betta and will surely start eatting at their fins.

But I do agree about the 100% changes, its not likely to be able to cycle such a small tank so since they're living in their waste it needs to be fulling cleaned.

CinRell
01-15-2007, 05:58 PM
See with my other guys I used to do 100% change every week or so in my 5 gallon. Obviously I've since learned this is WRONG. My water vac doesn't get all the poo but it does "ok"..

So I should do, on my 5 gallon filtered tank, a 50% water change per week?

For those who saw my other question about the submersable heater, I "took the plunge" and submersed it, cord and all, and it's working super. It keeps the tempat about 78 degrees:)

Now I have to get a betta;)

f1oored
01-16-2007, 04:24 PM
On the five gallon I would probably do about a 50% depending on what your nitrates look like and what all you have in it. Some people say 20% and some say 75% so 50% is a good middle of the road amount.

Betta noob
I know ammonia isn't good for bettas but it's not nearly as bad for them as it is for most other fish. If you betta is in a 1 gallon bowl and you change the water once a week (like many people do) then your ammonia is going to be very high at the end of the week. High enough to kill most fish. A betta can not only survive this but actually thrive. Is it ideal? No. Would the fish be better off with lower ammonia levels? Yes. Ammonia mostly causes gill damage and bettas can avoid this by breathing air at the surface. Most fish are hurt when any level of ammonia is present in the water.