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GeneralGoldeneye
10-01-2008, 05:03 AM
I keep hearing Brackish waters but what is that. what kind of water is it and what fish need it?

xximanoobxx
10-01-2008, 05:09 AM
it's slightly salt water or sumin like that...1.016sg????
Mollies need em...
some other fish need em...
green spotted puffer...

Brackish water (less commonly brack water) is water that has more salinity than fresh water, but not as much as seawater. It may result from mixing of seawater with fresh water, as in estuaries, or it may occur in brackish fossil aquifers.

GeneralGoldeneye
10-01-2008, 05:12 AM
I had mollies in fresh water and they did fine

xximanoobxx
10-01-2008, 05:17 AM
Well it's better for mollies to be in brackish...
I've also seen mollies in a SW tank....

Dave66
10-01-2008, 05:20 AM
Brackish is anything over pure freshwater, which is 1.000. You need a refractometer to accurately measure the marine salt level in a brackish tank. If you hunt up my oddball primer, there's brackish levels for several of the species.

Dave

Sounguru
10-01-2008, 05:51 AM
Well it's better for mollies to be in brackish...
I've also seen mollies in a SW tank....

Sorry noob that is not exactly right Mollies if maintained correctly in pure FW will do just fine. Mollies are actually a FW fish that can tolerate all levels of salinity, but by nature is pure FW.

The only Mollies that I keep any salt with are the fry becasue there are so many in the tanks and the Blacks because they are fungus magnets. The rest on my mollies are in pure FW. My salt levels are real low too like 1.003 or so.

kaybee
10-01-2008, 10:48 AM
...what kind of water is it...?

An example of a brackish environment in nature would be the area where a river flows into the ocean, an estuary. Not quite freshwater, not quite saltwater, and probably with salinity variations. A mangrove would be another example.

In an aquarium setting one would probably want to keep salinity levels 'relatively' stable so as not to eliminate corresponding beneficial bacteria colonies.

Regarding mollies, where are they found in the wild? That would explain if they're strictly FW fish or freshwater fish capable of living in a brackish environment, etc.

GeneralGoldeneye
10-01-2008, 12:16 PM
I have freshwater cichlids but i do have a little bit of salt in the tank for them

Sounguru
10-01-2008, 05:05 PM
Regarding mollies, where are they found in the wild? That would explain if they're strictly FW fish or freshwater fish capable of living in a brackish environment, etc.

Mollies are found in all enviroments but by biology are FW. This has been a arguement gone over and over but when you actually look at the scientific side they are FW but can tolerate and survive all levels of salt. We had a ? about it on the last quiz.

Lord knows I had this discussion with another poster (ILMGB?) over this same subject and we agreed on all parts but the Black Molley. In my experience it is the only one that really does any better with a small amount of salt to help it. There are a lot of sites that say it is brackish but this is another aquarium myth that has been continued long after the correct information has became avaiable.

Just to let you know most fish farms breed and keep their mollies in FW it is when they reach the store that they first encounter salt, because of the before mentioned myth. Also most true Molley breeders breed in pure FW as I do. Like I said I have salt in my Blacks tank and my fry tank because it is overcrowed at the moment until I send some off to market all the rest are in pure FW.

sanddigger
10-03-2008, 02:02 AM
I Think one must add that Brackish REQUIERS Ocean salt. Cichlid Aquarium salt (larger grains) does not make a "Brackish Tank". I feel BW is not hard to maintain, but somewhat hard to understand. It can be really simple. Easy to maintain for most BW fish.

Please remember BW fish are born in FW and migrate toward the oceans. That in turn brings on SW mixed with FW = BW. The SG in your tanks can flex because thats the "nature of the beast". Most BW fish can flex from .05 to
.10. Some require higher SG depending in the breed, size, etc.

As Dave said," refractormeter" is the way to go...

Mollies? I would say NO, to a BW enviornment. IMO I think most say BW for mollies because they are subject to ick.

Salt and higher temps can combat ick in most cases.

dean30bb
10-05-2008, 04:10 AM
brackish water is basicly in between fresh and salt water most aussie native that i have live in brackish waters silver scats sleepy cods eeltail cats barramundi and so on

riot
11-02-2008, 02:32 AM
So, how would one go about creating a brackish water tank from scratch? What materials are needed? How should the water test as far as nitrites/nitrates, ph, hardness and so on?

ILuvMyGoldBarb
11-02-2008, 02:50 AM
A proper brackish environment requires marine salt. Testing for nitrites, nitrates, hardness, and Ph would all be done normally. Depending on weather it is low or high brackish you would use either a FW or SW ammonia kit. API makes it easy because they include the chart for both FW and SW. There are really no specialized test kits for brackish.
There's really no special equipment need to set up a brackish tank, with the sole exception of a hydrometer or refractometer. I'd recommend the refractometer for the sake of accuracy. As for the rest, you can decorate it however you like. There are some plants that can tollerate a brackish environment so you could find some of those.


BTW, Mollies are not brackish fish, they are in fact what is known as a Freshwater euryhaline species. Simply put, they are a fresh water species that is capable of adapting to wide range of salinities, all the way up to, and including, full marine.

riot
11-02-2008, 07:31 AM
A proper brackish environment requires marine salt. Testing for nitrites, nitrates, hardness, and Ph would all be done normally. Depending on weather it is low or high brackish you would use either a FW or SW ammonia kit. API makes it easy because they include the chart for both FW and SW. There are really no specialized test kits for brackish.
There's really no special equipment need to set up a brackish tank, with the sole exception of a hydrometer or refractometer. I'd recommend the refractometer for the sake of accuracy. As for the rest, you can decorate it however you like. There are some plants that can tollerate a brackish environment so you could find some of those.


BTW, Mollies are not brackish fish, they are in fact what is known as a Freshwater euryhaline species. Simply put, they are a fresh water species that is capable of adapting to wide range of salinities, all the way up to, and including, full marine.

Thanks for the information. I am setting up a brackish water tank asap as my green spotted puffer will need it as he gets older.

Mvjnz
11-14-2008, 05:18 AM
I have heard of people who live near the sea who collect sea water which they then mix with tap water to create brackish water. I'm not sure of the amount they used, but I think it was 3 buckets of sea water to 7 buckets of tap water.

But of course that would vary depending on how salty you want it.

filterfish
06-02-2013, 04:49 AM
I'm sorry to barge in here with my own molly breeding issue. but you know your stuff. I started to breed three of my balloon molly's and one got Shimmy Syndrome. I was told that meant they needed electrolyte's = salt. Why is this if mollies are FW.....is it because they are pregnant?

Sligg
06-02-2013, 06:26 AM
Filterfish, this thread is coming up to five years old.

Might want to make a new one!

filterfish
06-03-2013, 05:15 AM
okay thanksthumbs2: