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Full3R
01-05-2007, 12:43 AM
Can Anyone give me some info on the upside down catfish, i just bought one, along with 10 neons, 4 tropical plattys and 2 coldwater plattys

jeffs99dime
01-05-2007, 12:46 AM
pulled off the net:

Scientific Name: Synodontis nigriventris
Family: Mochokidae
Origin: Zaire and Niger River basin
Adult Size: 4 inches (20 cm)
Social: Peaceful
Lifespan: 5+ years
Tank Level: All levels
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Diet: Omnivore, eats most foods
Breeding: Egglayer
Care: Easy
pH: 6 - 7.5
Hardness: 4-15 dGH
Temperature: 72-79 F (22-26 C)

Description: Numbered among the Synodontis species, the upside-down catfish is aptly named for its upside down swimming posture. They are a popular species that apparently have been admired for countless centuries, as their images have been found in ancient Egyptian art.
Considered a dwarf catfish, they reach an adult size of 3-4 inches. Like other members of the Mochikidae family, they have large eyes, a large adipose fin, forked tail, and three pairs of barbels. Their light brown colored body is covered with dark brown blotches of various sizes. Interestingly, the underside of the body is darker hued, which is the opposite of fish that swim with their belly downwards. This reverse coloration serves to camouflage them when they swim at the surface of the water.
Habitat/Care: Well suited to the aquarium environment, they are peaceful and easy to care for, but are best kept in small schools. Water should be moderately soft and slightly acidic to neutral. Temperate is not critical. A well-planted tank is ideal, preferably using broad-leafed plants, as they like to browse the undersides of leaves. Driftwood, rock arches, and caves that provide places to hide, are recommended. It is quite normal for this fish to hang out on the underside of rocks, leaves, and driftwood.
Diet: In nature the upside down catfish feeds primarily on insects at the surface of the water. They will also graze on algae to supplement their diet. In the aquarium environment they adapt readily to all types of foods, from dry to live or frozen. For optimum health, provide a varied diet that includes insect larvae when possible.
Breeding: There have been a limited number of successful spawnings in an aquarium. Females are larger, are paler in coloration, and have a plumper more rounded body, particularly when ready to spawn. Preparation with live foods, and softening the water to mimic spring rains will increase the odds for success. An overturned clay flowerpot or two, or even some PVC pipe, may be offered as a possible spawning location. Parents may be left in the tank after spawning, as they will tend to the brood.

The eggs hatch in approximately two days, and the fry will feed off the yolk sac, which they carry for four days. Upon the fourth day, they will begin eating freshly hatched brine shrimp. In two months the fry will begin swimming in the characteristic upside down fashion of adults.

Full3R
01-05-2007, 12:54 AM
it says there size is 4 inches (20cm) 4 inches is 10cm lol Thanx jeff

jeffs99dime
01-05-2007, 01:07 AM
i wish that we (united states) would just go to the metric system like the rest of the world-- it's so much easier. everthing is in 10's. we always have to be different. lol

Full3R
01-05-2007, 01:50 AM
yeah but we (australia) are turning more like america everyday, im not dissing america in anyway but for god sake in Victoria in Aus they are building "wisterier Lane" and building the houses like the ones featured in desperate housewives, No offence but thats not australian and nor should it be we need to have our own individual things dag nabbit

jeffs99dime
01-05-2007, 01:54 AM
none taken. i totally understand! i'm not going to comment on this further, however. this is a sore subject for many, not me though

Full3R
01-05-2007, 02:01 AM
yes, besides this is aboot Upside down catfish, speaking of which mines kinda staying in the same place near the heater just hovering upside down is that normal?

blue fin
01-05-2007, 03:00 AM
Great info Jeff, thanks for pulling it and posting.:thumb: :

jeffs99dime
01-05-2007, 03:00 AM
sure thing! i learned a lot too! lol

Incredulous_Ed
01-05-2007, 03:15 AM
yes, besides this is aboot Upside down catfish, speaking of which mines kinda staying in the same place near the heater just hovering upside down is that normal?
Are there any caves in the aquarium? They like to hide in caves. It is probably in that area that the catfish feels most comfortable.
Another thing, they like to be in small groups.

blue fin
01-05-2007, 03:19 AM
I have a large castle in my 75 gal tank and mine loves to swim through, around, under...etc always hiding under it when he's not being active.

AquaQueen
01-05-2007, 03:37 AM
your catfish is active durring the day?? My "Monster" is most active when the lights go out then I can hear him chasing his dinner around all night. Maybe it is because mine was wild at one point.

blue fin
01-05-2007, 03:41 AM
Yeah... has a great time looking for food all over the tank when the lights are on, I don't know how active he is during the dark hours. He's fickle though, some times he hides most of the day, sometimes he is completely quiet and can't be found, other times he digs in the gravel, swims around like the tank is a jungle jim.

jeffs99dime
01-05-2007, 03:48 AM
Yeah... has a great time looking for food all over the tank when the lights are on, I don't know how active he is during the dark hours. He's fickle though, some times he hides most of the day, sometimes he is completely quiet and can't be found, other times he digs in the gravel, swims around like the tank is a jungle jim.

just a tip: if you want to observe their nocturnal characteristics, use a flashlight with a red lense. they cannot detect that. OR you could retrofit blue l.e.d.s into your existing hood.--jeff

AquaQueen
01-05-2007, 03:52 AM
I use a flashlight the catfish tank is one of the ones in my bedroom so I can hear him. He is not small...LOL...he splashes the water around and makes all sorts of noise...but he hides in the cave ALL day long I think he is boring but I don't want to get rid of him unless we are putting him back in the brooke we got him out of..which wont happen til summer..if we(I) will part with him...lol

blue fin
01-05-2007, 03:53 AM
Thanks Jeff, I don't think I'll bother him unless I stop seeing him during the day.

Lady Hobbs
01-05-2007, 04:15 AM
yeah but we (australia) are turning more like america everyday, im not dissing america in anyway but for god sake in Victoria in Aus they are building "wisterier Lane" and building the houses like the ones featured in desperate housewives, No offence but thats not australian and nor should it be we need to have our own individual things dag nabbit

Would you believe in Texas the rag heads want to build a Mosque! Bad enough TX is over-run with illegal Mexicans but a Mosque now. Hummm....how will this look amoung all the cattle ranches and oil fields?

http://images.google.com/images?q=tbn:4EsxBZVkNl9xdM:www.econ.ucdavis.edu/faculty/fzfeens/photo_3/02_Fatepuri%2520Masjid%2520Mosque.JPG (http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.econ.ucdavis.edu/faculty/fzfeens/photo_3/02_Fatepuri%2520Masjid%2520Mosque.JPG&imgrefurl=http://www.econ.ucdavis.edu/faculty/fzfeens/India_trip_and_photos.html&h=1944&w=2592&sz=1244&tbnid=4EsxBZVkNl9xdM:&tbnh=113&tbnw=150&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dmosque&start=1&sa=X&oi=images&ct=image&cd=1)

blue fin
01-05-2007, 05:31 AM
probably like a new target.

Full3R
01-06-2007, 12:27 AM
i see, thanx, there was one barrel in there and hes hiding in there now, i shall buy another friend for it (they only have one left at the local fish store) and shall put many more hiding spots in there i need them anyway for the discus aswell :)

Drumachine09
01-06-2007, 02:41 AM
If you UDC is hovering by the heater, he might be cold. If your heater is not already by the intake valve of your filter, you should move it there, because it redistributes the heat more evenly.

Full3R
01-06-2007, 10:43 AM
they water temp is up, its next to the intake of the filter, i think he was justhinding because i put logs in and hes under them instead now

jman
01-09-2007, 07:09 PM
pulled off the net:

Scientific Name: Synodontis nigriventris
Family: Mochokidae
Origin: Zaire and Niger River basin
Adult Size: 4 inches (20 cm)
Social: Peaceful
Lifespan: 5+ years
Tank Level: All levels
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallon
Diet: Omnivore, eats most foods
Breeding: Egglayer
Care: Easy
pH: 6 - 7.5
Hardness: 4-15 dGH
Temperature: 72-79 F (22-26 C)

Description: Numbered among the Synodontis species, the upside-down catfish is aptly named for its upside down swimming posture. They are a popular species that apparently have been admired for countless centuries, as their images have been found in ancient Egyptian art.
Considered a dwarf catfish, they reach an adult size of 3-4 inches. Like other members of the Mochikidae family, they have large eyes, a large adipose fin, forked tail, and three pairs of barbels. Their light brown colored body is covered with dark brown blotches of various sizes. Interestingly, the underside of the body is darker hued, which is the opposite of fish that swim with their belly downwards. This reverse coloration serves to camouflage them when they swim at the surface of the water.
Habitat/Care: Well suited to the aquarium environment, they are peaceful and easy to care for, but are best kept in small schools. Water should be moderately soft and slightly acidic to neutral. Temperate is not critical. A well-planted tank is ideal, preferably using broad-leafed plants, as they like to browse the undersides of leaves. Driftwood, rock arches, and caves that provide places to hide, are recommended. It is quite normal for this fish to hang out on the underside of rocks, leaves, and driftwood.
Diet: In nature the upside down catfish feeds primarily on insects at the surface of the water. They will also graze on algae to supplement their diet. In the aquarium environment they adapt readily to all types of foods, from dry to live or frozen. For optimum health, provide a varied diet that includes insect larvae when possible.
Breeding: There have been a limited number of successful spawnings in an aquarium. Females are larger, are paler in coloration, and have a plumper more rounded body, particularly when ready to spawn. Preparation with live foods, and softening the water to mimic spring rains will increase the odds for success. An overturned clay flowerpot or two, or even some PVC pipe, may be offered as a possible spawning location. Parents may be left in the tank after spawning, as they will tend to the brood.

The eggs hatch in approximately two days, and the fry will feed off the yolk sac, which they carry for four days. Upon the fourth day, they will begin eating freshly hatched brine shrimp. In two months the fry will begin swimming in the characteristic upside down fashion of adults.

also thanks jeff!

jeffs99dime
01-09-2007, 09:30 PM
no problemo meng!