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kaybee
07-23-2008, 04:47 AM
Here are some photo's of coral feeder tentacles, or basically comparisons of how the coral looks when the tentacles are retracted and then extended:

Goniastrea
With tentacles retracted, this coral cannot consume large food items; it's primarily in photosynthesis-mode in this pic:
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a259/y2kenny19/Saltwater/goniastrea-1.jpg

At night, short feeder tentacles are extended. The green 'centers' lead to individual 'mouths', so this one brain coral could potentially consume dozens of mysis shrimp in one setting. This coral is also capable of extending longer sweepers about 4" in length (not present in this photo), in addition to the feeders:
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a259/y2kenny19/Saltwater/goniastrea.jpg

Acanthastrea
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a259/y2kenny19/Saltwater/acan-1.jpg

Feeder tentacles extended. This acan has a very quick feeding response and each polyp can 'put away' mysis shrimp in rapid succession:
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a259/y2kenny19/Saltwater/acanthastrea.jpg


More to follow....

kaybee
07-23-2008, 04:59 AM
Tubastraea
This coral is completely non-photosynthetic, so it must be fed in order to survive and thrive. Primarily a nocturnal feeder, it's typically 'closed' during the day:
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a259/y2kenny19/Saltwater/sunclosed.jpg

The polyps of the orange and black sun coral polyps open up right about 30min before the lights go out and close again when the lights come back on. In addition to being spot fed by me, it captures live mysid shrimp which come out at night:
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a259/y2kenny19/Saltwater/tubastraea-1.jpg

Caulastrea
The feeders are partially extended. They do this sometimes when they sense food in the water.
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a259/y2kenny19/Saltwater/t2.jpg

Feeders fully extended
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a259/y2kenny19/Saltwater/trumpfeed.jpg

Tigerbarb
07-23-2008, 05:00 AM
It's amazing how all those polyps form into one skeleton, and eat at night when most coral-eating fish are asleep. The second pic of the Acanthastrea is definite POTM material. It's nice that you were able to get those pix!

kaybee
07-23-2008, 05:16 AM
Trachyphyllia
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a259/y2kenny19/Saltwater/trach.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a259/y2kenny19/Saltwater/trachfeed.jpg

Lobophyllia
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a259/y2kenny19/Saltwater/14jun08.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a259/y2kenny19/Saltwater/lobophyllia.jpg

These 'brains' are capable of eating large quantities of food as well as larger food items, such as whole krill (which are too big for the other corals I've posted to consume). When bigger they will be able to take in silversides.

Dave66
07-23-2008, 05:25 AM
Very, very nice, Kaybee. I adore seeing corals in such health.

Dave

spudbuds
07-23-2008, 05:34 AM
Great pics. That is one of the things I enjoy most about keeping a reef. Watching corals change shape and do different things to serve different functions. Very cool.

Thanks for sharing.
- Bill

oldhead
07-23-2008, 11:40 AM
Wow this is an awesome post, thanks for taking the time. You got some great looking corals and some nice shots of them. Nice job! :19: Defnitely cool to see what they look like in feeder mode.

Pamela_S.
07-23-2008, 02:11 PM
Those are amazing!! And very beautiful!! I'd be up all night looking and watching them...LOL! Thanks for sharing! thumbs2:

TowBoater
07-23-2008, 02:17 PM
I love seeing my LPS do that at night!