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ladyoutlaw50
06-30-2008, 11:01 PM
I was just watching the news and they were talking about the Lion Fish invading the Atlantic ocean. They have started removing them as they are eating everything in sight!! They said that in Bermuda they are becoming infested with them and whereas they have the stingers they are not prey for another fish. It was said that they started showing up in Florida in the late 90's. The report referred to the Lion Fish as a cockroach in New York.
I found that interesting!!! Probably everyone already saw the report, but wanted to share anyway -- it was on the NBC news tonight

ILuvMyGoldBarb
06-30-2008, 11:13 PM
Yup, there are a couple of ways they got here. The most likely theory is that they were carried here in the ballasts of large container ships while still in their planktonic larval stage. They would have been carried through the Panama Canal from the pacific where they are native. There is a thriving population of Pterois volitans off the coast of North Carolina as well. This is just another classic case of what can happen when a non-native fish is introduced to an ecosystem. Unfortunately, there are some who want to pin their Atlantic existance on irresponsible marine hobbyists who released them. While there may have been some, there certainly was not enough to start a thriving population.

ladyoutlaw50
06-30-2008, 11:19 PM
They are cool looking fish!! I didn't realize how large they actually grew!

ILuvMyGoldBarb
06-30-2008, 11:20 PM
Yup. P. volatins will easily reach 14-15 inches. There's a lot of different fish that will fit in the mouth of a predator that large. The really amazing thing about them is how fast they move when they strike their prey.

BTW, something that people may not realize, but between, Stonefish, Scorpionfish, and Lionfish, the Lionfish is the least venomous of the three.

ladyoutlaw50
06-30-2008, 11:23 PM
they are pretty fish!! The news showed a bunch of divers down there collecting them to relocate them. I am glad that they were not killing them!!
I just hope that it doesn't affect the marine hobbyist as they mentioned checking all fish not native.

ILuvMyGoldBarb
06-30-2008, 11:30 PM
Well, I see one major problem with the relocation of them. Where they are they are able to reproduce unhindered. The population has been able to explode to nuisance proportions. In their natural habitat they have not taken over due to natural predation that takes place during their early growth stages. Returning such a large number of these predators to their natural habitat could prove disastrous, those ecosystems have developed just as they should. Many of those young Lions that came to the Atlantic were spared the likelihood of being eaten because they were removed from natural predators. I agree that some should be moved, but not all, things only get worse when we try to fix messes we've made. Remove them from this environment, but let nature adapt in their natural environment, the damage is not irreversible without our intervention. The fish being taken from the Atlantic could easily be made available to the hobby without any being taken from their natural habitat.

ladyoutlaw50
06-30-2008, 11:35 PM
I agree with you 100%

mp3rp
07-01-2008, 10:34 PM
the report referred to the Lion Fish as a cockroach in New York.

I lived in NY mostly all my life and I have never seen or heard of these fish swimming around here. From what I have heard on Nat Geo is that they are found mostly in warm water near/in reefs and I can guarantee you that the water here is not warm and does not consist of any reefs. i doubt a fish like that could survive. Seriously did you ever see how dirty the water here is? It is absolutely disgusting.

smaug
07-01-2008, 10:38 PM
They are expensive to buy!Maybe they should set up a lionfish rescue like they do with wild mustangs out west!

ladyoutlaw50
07-01-2008, 10:45 PM
I lived in NY mostly all my life and I have never seen or heard of these fish swimming around here. From what I have heard on Nat Geo is that they are found mostly in warm water near/in reefs and I can guarantee you that the water here is not warm and does not consist of any reefs. i doubt a fish like that could survive. Seriously did you ever see how dirty the water here is? It is absolutely disgusting.

I believe what they were doing is comparing to the cockroaches in new york -- using that as an example of how many of the Lion Fish they are finding in the atlantic

mp3rp
07-01-2008, 10:52 PM
I believe what they were doing is comparing to the cockroaches in new york -- using that as an example of how many of the Lion Fish they are finding in the atlantic

LOL i feel like an idiot. I misunderstood. I thought that "The report referred to the Lion Fish as a cockroach in New York" meant that there are as many lion fish in New York as cockroach's.... Sorry lol.:hmm3grin2orange:

ladyoutlaw50
07-01-2008, 10:57 PM
Please don't feel like an idiot -- you just misunderstood!! I probably didn't word it right the first time!!! No Problems No worries!!!

ILuvMyGoldBarb
07-01-2008, 11:00 PM
I thought that "The report referred to the Lion Fish as a cockroach in New York" meant that there are as many lion fish in New York as cockroach's.... Sorry lol.:hmm3grin2orange:
The harbour isn't big enough to hold them all. LOL

Seriously though, when people think of Coral Reefs, the first thing that comes to mind is The Great Barrier Reef, the Coral Sea, and tropical locations like that, however there are Coral Reefs all over this planet, even in the colder waters of the North Atlantic. For example, just a few years ago there was an area off the coast of Nova Scotia that was declared a nationally protected site because it is a coral reef with many species thriving there. Also, you would be amazed what the Gulf Stream will take north. There have been tropical species of Seahorse caught in Halifax harbor.