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allycat9
04-28-2008, 05:51 AM
:fish: hi a freind of mine has never had fish b4 but has just got a 4ft tank & he wants jaguar cichlids are they ok for starters & is the tank big enough????

nanaglen2001
04-28-2008, 06:25 AM
Jaguar Cichlids are no good for beginners, and the tank is way too small, cause a Jaguar becomes pretty big, up to 21 inches!!!!

Then its a predatory animal, which means it has to be fed with feeder fish, or at least fresh bigger food.

A tank in which a Jaguar can be kept should be at least 2,5 meters long and 1 meter deep.

Demjor19
04-28-2008, 11:45 AM
i have had my female jag in a 75 gallon tank for a year now and she is right around 7-8 inches long and eating pelleted foods, freeze dried krill, and the occassional raw shrimp.

they are capable of getting pretty large, but i think 16-18 inches is a much more likely size (for an adult male)...females remain much smaller. as long as the space requirements can be met they are a pretty easy fish to keep. i honestly feel a 75 gallon can house a female for life and would house a male for a good few years. they have a pretty slow growth rate.

digger
04-28-2008, 08:21 PM
i have two female jags between 9 & 10 inches each they are in a 90 gal with two large common plecos which tolerate each others company , no other tank mates have ever worked out , they are an easy fish to keep mine are fed floating pellets and feeder gold fish i alternate their feeding so that they are not fed the same thing every day , i find them a very easy fish to keep ,but they do need a large tank because they can get 18 inches ( my last male jag was 18 inches ) they are extremely territorial and i have been bitten by them when doing tank maintenance but they are a very interesting fish to keep and they all seem to have different personalitys they will rip up and destroy any plants you try to put in there and once big enough like mine they will also destroy any ornaments you put in the tank as well as push everything around they like to pile their gravel in a big pile in the middle of their tank my advise to you is if you are looking for a community tank these are not the fish to have they are a species only fish and will attack anything that moves in their tank.

RainMan
04-28-2008, 08:49 PM
Big fish... I saw a breeding pair at the lfs a few weeks ago. Scarry looking buggas. Very intimidating to me.... I wouldn't pick it as my first fish. LOL

That's kind of random... why a jaguar cichlid. That's really why I posted in here. No great wisdom from me. Just curious.

cocoa_pleco
04-28-2008, 09:39 PM
personally i would say 125g min. for one

RainMan
04-28-2008, 11:46 PM
personally i would say 125g min. for one

That sounds pretty accurate.... they are huge!!! Almost too big to be in a tank at all.

Demjor19
04-29-2008, 01:32 AM
That sounds pretty accurate.... they are huge!!! Almost too big to be in a tank at all.

a female jaguar gets no larger than an oscar...just a thought. even the males dont get that much larger than an oscar. i agree though, the larger the aquarium the better off they will be, but that goes for any fish. with that said...i would also say a 125+ gallon tank would be good for an adult jaguar cichlid.

Dsoto87
04-29-2008, 04:21 AM
If you want a jaguar without the size get a motaguense which is another member of the parachromis family. Its a piscivore and out right aggressive

allycat9
04-29-2008, 04:25 AM
Big fish... I saw a breeding pair at the lfs a few weeks ago. Scarry looking buggas. Very intimidating to me.... I wouldn't pick it as my first fish. LOL

That's kind of random... why a jaguar cichlid. That's really why I posted in here. No great wisdom from me. Just curious.

he wants a big aggressive fish to show off but doesn't want an oscar because he thinks everyone has one he went looking on the net & saw a pic of a jaguar & thought it would look good.

RainMan
04-29-2008, 12:15 PM
Well... he found the right fish. LOL But, it's probably not that easy to keep for a first timer. Unless he has a lot of money (tank and equipment) and someone to help him get going.

I read a few choice sites... 125gal min. for a single fish and 50gal for each additional tank mate.

Your friend is going to have a problem finding a small predator fish.. They all tend to get big and require large spaces.

The fw puffer is one of the only predator fish that I can think that isn't huge. There are a few choices of species. They are pretty interesting to watch. Not so intimidating though. They are also hard to keep with other fish including other puffers.

Maybe someone else has some ideas.

Demjor19
04-29-2008, 07:28 PM
another point id like to mention...a jaguar cichlid is not that aggressive. i keep mine in a community setting, BUT if a male and female pair off they will destroy anything that comes near them or their nest.

another option could be a "false gar" (Boulengerella maculata, Ctenolucius hujeta, or Xenentodon cancila) they all typically max out around 12" or so and are very fun to watch hunt. they dont really have a very intimidating presence though and they can be very tricky to wien from live foods.

Fishguy2727
04-29-2008, 09:52 PM
Demjor, yours looks like a female, which explains its tolerant behavior. My 15" male jag would charge me, left scratches on the glass. He would go at me if I reached in the tank, drew blood twice. They are very aggressive. I am guessing yours has been with other fish since it was small and that not much has been added since it has been in there.

Size is very variable. Some only hit 12". Mine was 15" and still growing slowly (he was only three or four years old). The largest I have heard of was about 17-18". A 75 is minimum for a pair. If you end up with one that is huge, then you will need to upgrade. But I would not assume you will get an abnormally large one. This is based on people i have talked to who have big ones that they have bred. A fish should not be any longer than the width of the tank. So in a 75 that is a max of 17-18".

They are predatory, but that does not limit them to experts or even advanced hobbyists. They will eat pellets just like any other fish.

They are hardy like many other larger cichlids. This can actually be a problem because it means they hide problems very well. Dietary and water quality problems may not be apparent until years down the road, at which point most people will assume it was not either since it did not become obvious sooner.

With moderate research and strict care (aggressive water change schedule, massive filtration, very high quality diet) it is a good option for the beginner.

Demjor19
04-29-2008, 11:11 PM
Demjor, yours looks like a female, which explains its tolerant behavior. My 15" male jag would charge me, left scratches on the glass. He would go at me if I reached in the tank, drew blood twice. They are very aggressive. I am guessing yours has been with other fish since it was small and that not much has been added since it has been in there.

Size is very variable. Some only hit 12". Mine was 15" and still growing slowly (he was only three or four years old). The largest I have heard of was about 17-18". A 75 is minimum for a pair. If you end up with one that is huge, then you will need to upgrade. But I would not assume you will get an abnormally large one. This is based on people i have talked to who have big ones that they have bred. A fish should not be any longer than the width of the tank. So in a 75 that is a max of 17-18".

They are predatory, but that does not limit them to experts or even advanced hobbyists. They will eat pellets just like any other fish.

They are hardy like many other larger cichlids. This can actually be a problem because it means they hide problems very well. Dietary and water quality problems may not be apparent until years down the road, at which point most people will assume it was not either since it did not become obvious sooner.

With moderate research and strict care (aggressive water change schedule, massive filtration, very high quality diet) it is a good option for the beginner.

yes, mine is a female and she has been with other fish since she was around a 1/2" long. i have added almost every fish she is currently with (over a period of time) with no troubles. she will get into an occassional fight with her tankmates, but nothing that has caused any concern.

i have heard that males are more aggressive than the females, but i have seen them in community setups as well. it all comes down to the inividual fish.

Fishguy2727
04-29-2008, 11:22 PM
Most of it has to do with how long they have been with other fish and how big they are when they are added. Tank size can also play a huge role. These are aggressive fish and not to be underestimated.

Demjor19
04-29-2008, 11:43 PM
definitely don't underestimate them! they are big fish and do have the capability of doing much damage. i have just been very fortunate so far.

i am hoping to have the same results with my male dovii, but i have the extra tank ready for when he does snap. i have been raising him from a fairly small size as well (in a community tank). so far all is perfect, but he is just now nearing maturity...we'll see.

Fishguy2727
04-30-2008, 02:20 AM
Community as in fish of similar size and/or aggression, not the classical community tank. So cichlids and the like, not tetras etc. Just want to specify for people reading this.

Dsoto87
04-30-2008, 05:35 AM
Im telling you, check out the motaguense. Its a predator and agressive but you could keep it in a 4 footer unlike the managuense....another agressive fish are grammodes


Heres a picture of a juvenile mota

Demjor19
04-30-2008, 12:00 PM
Community as in fish of similar size and/or aggression, not the classical community tank. So cichlids and the like, not tetras etc. Just want to specify for people reading this.

LOL! yes...community tank: 6" Gold Severum. 5" Green Severum, 6" Dovii, and a 6" Jack Dempsey. NEVER put these fish with ANYTHING that can fit in their mouths. they WILL eat it!